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Abbot Academy Bulletin 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of American Alumni Council 



President 
Mrs. Rolfe M. Kennedy 
(Roberta Kendall) 
Douglaston, N. Y. 

Vice-presidents 
Mrs. Frank C. d'Elseaux 
(Virginia Gay) 
Winchester, Mass. 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
Andover, Mass. 



Mrs. Ernest L. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



OFFICERS, 1 944- 1 946 

Clerk 
Mrs. Edwin H. Goodwin 
(Susan Hildreth) 
Winchester, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. James E. Downs 
(Laura Cheever) 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 
Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 
Miss Marion R. McPherson 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 

I 939~ I 945 . 1942-194^ 

Mrs. A. John Holden Miss Margaret Van Voorhis 

(Polly Bullard) 304 Lexington Ave. 

Middlebury, Vermont New York City, New York 

ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



Boston 
Miss Irene Atwood 
6 Lanark Rd. 
Brookline, Mass. 

Chicago 
Mrs. J. Allen Lind 
(Mary Simpson) 
1239 Asbury Ave. 
Winnetka, Illinois 

Connecticut 
Miss Sara G. Peck 
20 Fairview Terrace 
Derby. Conn. 

Detroit 
Mrs. Thomas A. Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
1 2 1 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Michigan 

Maine, Eastern 
Miss Eleanor Bird 
250 Broadway 
Rockland, Maine 



Maine, Western 
Mrs. Harold Robinson 
(Harriette Woolverton) 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

New York 
Miss Charlotte Dane 
21 East 37th St. 
New York City, N. Y. 

Ohio, Central 
Mrs. Paul Meek 
(Louise Norpell) 
Worthington, Ohio 

Ohio, Cleveland 
Mrs. George Worthington 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 

Old Colony 
Mrs. Richard M. Thompson 
(Ruth Niles) 
300 Woodlawn St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Pittsburgh 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
515 No. McKean St. 
Butler, Pa. 



('* 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



D 



Series 12 



OCTOBER 1944 



Issue i 



Table of Contents 



page 



Cover; Abbot Academy, September 1944 
Frontispiece; School Officers 
"Building Tomorrow Today" 
Faculty Announcements .... 

Abbot Board of Trustees 

The Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund 

Honor A's; Cum Laude; New Alumnae Relatives 

Alumnae Association 

Abbot Alumnae in War Services 

Abbot Clubs 

Class Reunions (photographs) 

Class Reunions (names 

In Memoriam 

Class News 



Marguerite Hearsey 



2 

3 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 

1 1 

12 

14 
14 

15 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 
JANE B. CARPENTER, 1892, honorary 

constance parker chipman, 1906 
marion r. Mcpherson, 1918 

ROBERTA KENDALL KENNEDY, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 




School Officers 



Left to right— Mary Jane Kurth, 
Treasurer Senior class; Holly Welles, 
President Abbot Christian Association; 
Hilary Paterson, President Student 
Government; Beatrice Van Cleve, 
{sitting), President Senior class. 



Left to right — Hilary Paterson; 
Cynthia Smith, Vice-president Abbot 
Christian Association; Holly Welles; 
Sally Spear, President Abbot Athletic 
Association. 







Courtesy Abbot Circle 19 U 



"Building Tomorrow Today" 

The 1 1 6th year of Abbot has opened most propitiously with one hundred 
and eighty-one eager students, many of whom will be here for three or four 
years, and all of whom, before we know it — before they know it — will become 
alumnae. For some reason, I think for a good many reasons, Abbot and 
schools like Abbot, as well as boys' preparatory schools, have been deluged 
with applications this year, and the administrators of these schools are 
astonished by the great demand for what we as a group have to give, or at 
least what the public — the parents — think we have to give. 

This is a sobering and challenging thought and educators do not enter- 
tain it lightly. One has but to note the titles of new books and of articles in 
magazines and glance at the programs of educational meetings and confer- 
ences to be impressed with the great amount of thought that is being devoted 
to the present and to the future of education. The alumnae cannot help being 
glad and proud that their school is faced with this new demand, and hopeful 
that Abbot can have a part in meeting it. 

Call it sentiment, if you will, or nostalgia, but it is a very human trait to 
turn back somewhat wistfully for a moment or two as a new school year 
begins, to the days when you were young, and all of life seemed bounded by a 
few acres of lawns and trees, and your greatest problems were those "or- 
iginals" to be solved in geometry, your greatest fears that the Gargoyles or 
the Griffins might lose that hockey game on Field Day! No doubt distance 
does lend enchantment, but it is true that school days, on the whole, are 
good days, and it would rejuvenate and reinspirit even the most war-weary 
and worldly wise to spend a few hours, on one of these lovely fall days, walk- 
ing on the school grounds and watching the girls as they play tennis, and 
basketball, and hockey; or sitting in Abbot Hall at the morning chapel 
service, listening to the beautiful volume of young voices singing "Gome, 
my soul, thou must be waking," or "Rejoice, ye pure in heart." 

One could not but be glad that these girls, and girls in other similar 
schools are having such an opportunity, one could not but contrast their 
good fortune with that of thousands, millions, of other young people, and be 
confident that surely, with such a heritage these girls would be able to leaven 
the life of their generation with sanity and gaiety, and good will. 

But no one who has any responsibility for a school like this has any 
illusion that ours is an easy job. We are constantly approached with the 
question "What are you doing to help these girls to think clearly and act con- 
structively for their part in the post-war world?" I have been asked to speak 
on that subject very soon, before a group of women whose program for the 
year is "Building Tomorrow Today." What I shall tell them may sound 
very simple, very undramatic and unexciting, but on the whole it is summed 
up by Ruskin in this way: "You do not educate a man by telling him what he 



knew not, but by making him what he was not." And that is the goal toward 
which Abbot continues to direct its efforts. How well we succeed we shall 
probably never really know, but I imagine that there are many who read 
this Bulletin who can say, "I may have learned some algebra and Latin 
and chemistry at Abbot, but it's a struggle for me to explain anything in any 
of those subjects to Junior or to Sister, yet I am sure I became a different 
person during those years at Abbot, and even if I have forgotten a lot I once 
learned, I have a notion that the change in me was somehow due to a com- 
bination of all I had to do in those days, all that influenced me there, in addi- 
tion, of course, to what my parents had done or tried to do with me before 
I went away to school!" 

Dorothy Dix (such a wise lady, at times!) put it this way in one of her 
columns this summer, advocating boarding school for girls: "And whether 
Arabella acquires any book learning or not when she goes off to school, she 
does get some education she can never get at home. She learns to stand on her 
own feet, she learns how to give and take, how to make friends, and has her 
self-esteem deflated." 

Not a bad beginning as preparation for that post-war world! And yes, 
all of this happens at Abbot, but much more. There is a well-balanced, a 
rationed, diet of play and work, of physical exercise, mental discipline, and 
religious influence. Moreover, there is constant exposure to art and music, as 
well as the gentler amenities of life. Theoretically, one can make a good case 
for our school and others like it, in answer to the question "What are you 
doing. . . . ?" And yet one can never be too confident of the results. Unless one 
could take the same girl and educate her twice — once one way and once 
another — one can never be wholly sure that what she has become is the re- 
sult of this school or that. It is, however, when the alumnae, analyzing their 
own pasts, testify to their own conviction of the moulding influence of their 
school, that teachers and principals and trustees and, I am sure, "all the 
saints who from their labors rest" experience a peculiar joy, and are freshly 
persuaded that what we are doing is contributing in some measure at least, to 
the "Building of Tomorrow Today." 



^^C^c^^M.t-^-c^t^ /^7i.a^2£t<. 




Faculty Announcements 

Miss Catherine Padwick takes the place of Miss Dorothy Baker, who re- 
cently returned to England. Miss Padwick (who is an Englishwoman by 
birth) is a graduate of Boston University, has an M.A. from Middlebury 
College, and comes to Abbot from seven years at the Grier School in Birm- 
ingham, Pennsylvania, where she was Head of the English Department. 

Miss Edith Hedin, Radcliffe A.B. 1943 and Yale University M.A., 1944, 
will be an assistant in the English Department. 

Miss Elinor Litchfield Strickland of Amherst, Mass., comes as teacher of 
Dramatics and Administrative Assistant. Miss Strickland is a graduate of the 
Leland Powers School and has had wide experience both in teaching and in 
administration of recreational activities. She was for a number of years the 
Dramatic and Recreational Director at Federal Hill House in Providence, 
Rhode Island, and she has been more recently Director of Dramatics at the 
Oak Grove School, Vassalboro, Maine. Miss Strickland will work primarily 
with the younger classes, while Mrs. Bertha Morgan Gray will continue her 
teaching of Speech and the directing of the plays for the two upper classes. 
Miss Strickland will also be an assistant in various general administrative 
matters. 

Mr. Arnold Kenseth, Minister of the Congregational Church in Ballard- 
vale, will assume Mr. Bernard Drew's classes in Bible, as Mr. Drew has moved 
to assume the duties of a church in Framingham. Mr. Kenseth is a graduate 
of Bates College and of the Harvard Divinity School. 

Miss Katherine Macdonald, a 1944 graduate of the Boston-Bouve School 
of Physical Education, has been appointed Assistant in the Physical Educa- 
tion Department in place of Miss Ruth Elvedt who has received an appoint- 
ment at Mt. Holyoke College. 

Miss Eleanor Little, A.B. University of Kansas City, 1940, M.A. Rad- 
cliffe, October 1944, is to be Librarian succeeding Miss Lucretia Hildreth, 
who left to be married. 

Dr. William G. Thompson, who has been honorably discharged from the 
Navy, is returning to his Andover practice, and will resume his position as 
school physician in place of Dr. Harold R. Kurth, who took on this added re- 
sponsibility as a "war service." 

News of Past Faculty 

Dorothy Baker has returned to her home in England. Address: 177 
Englishcombe Lane, Bath, Somerset, England. 

Rev. Bernard T. Drew is now minister of the Grace Congregational 
Church, Framingham. 

Ruth Elvedt is assistant in Physical Education at Mt. Holyoke College. 

Lucretia Hildreth was married on September 9, to Dr. Erwin J. Saxl. 
Address: 77 William St., Providence, R. I. 

Jean Nevius is teaching English at Kent Place School, Summit, N.J. 

5 



Abbot Board of Trustees 




Left to right: Irving Southworth (Clerk); Constance P. Chipman, George Abbot, 
Polly Bullard Holden, George Sawyer, Marguerite Hearsey (Principal), E. 
Barton Chapin (President), Margaret Morriss, Burton S. Flagg (Treasurer). 
Absent members: Mira Wilson, Margaret VanVoorhis, Rev. Sidney Lovett. 



The Alumnae Trustees announce herewith the dates of forthcoming 
meetings of the Abbot Board of Trustees. So much interest concerning the 
school was expressed in the recent questionnaires that we feel confident 
many alumnae may wish to write us for additional information. We shall 
welcome questions or comments; remember us, — we are your elected rep- 
resentatives. 

Meetings are scheduled for October 5; December 7; March 2, 1945. 

Polly Bullard Holden 
Middlebury, Vermont 

Margaret Van Voorhis 
304 Lexington Ave. 
New York City, N. Y. 



THE ABBOT 

2nd Century 
ALUMNAE FUND 





Class Fund Secretary, 1944 

Nancy L. McIvor 

Smith College 
Northampton, Mass. 



THE 


1944 


APPEAL 


Total contributions October 1st 






$1789. 


60 


Reunion Gifts 




Glass 


1889 


$90. 


OO 


Class 


1904 


$54- 


OO 


Class 


!9 J 9 


$59- 


OO 


Glass 1928 

(U.S.W.S. 


$18. 

Bond) 


50 




Total 


$221 


50 



Your gift is the expression of a 
desire to share with the trustees 
their vision for Abbot based on the 
principles held as fundamental to 
true happiness by the founders of 
the Academy. 

'The primary objects to be aimed 
at in the School shall ever be to 
regulate the tempers, to improve the 
taste, to discipline and enlarge the 
minds, and form the morals of the 
youth who may be members of it. 
To form the immortal mind to habits 
suited to an immortal being, and to 
instil principles of conduct and form 
the character for an immortal destiny, 
shall be subordinate to no other care. 
Solid acquirements shall always have 
precedence of those which are merely 
showy, and the useful of those which 
are merely ornamental." 



Honor A's, 1944 




Left to right: Marianna Hubbard, Patricia Damon, Aagot Hinrichsen, Elisabeth 
Golson, Alva Houston, Miss Hearsey, Nancy Mclvor, Janet Hitchcock, 
Elizabeth G. Rich. 



Cum Laude 1944 

Jacqueline Calvin Nancy Mclvor 

Marjorie Hamilton Carol Paradise 

Janet Hitchcock Katherine Pendleton 

Margaret Travis 



New Alumnae Relatives, September 1944 

Brigid Anne Bisgood, distant cousin of Ann Bacon Reinheimer, 1 942 

Nancy Elliot, sister of Mary Elliot Brown, 1 938 

Nancy Luse Hamilton, sister of Diantha, 1942 

Elizabeth Howe, sister of Margaret, ex 1 946 

Mary Louise Howe, daughter of Esther Van Dervoort Howe, 1 9 1 6 

Sally Monroe Humason, niece of Sarah Waters Monroe Humason, 1 9 1 7 

Andrea Lyons, daughter of Ruth Moore Lyons, 191 6; sister of Ruth S. Lyons, 1944 

Janet Dryden Mclvor, sister of Nancy L. Mclvor, 1944 

Elizabeth Ann Mitchell, sister of Janet, 1945 

Helen Taylor, cousin of Mary Jordan Taylor, 1 945 

Genevieve Barbara Wright, sister of Sylvia Wright Poole, 1936 

8 



Alumnae Association 



Annual Meeting of the Abbot Alumnae Association May 27, 1944 



Seventy alumnae from classes of '84- '43, 
met in Abbot Hall, on May 27, at 2.30 p.m. 
The meeting was called to order by the presi- 
dent, Mrs. Roberta Kendall Kennedy, who 
called for the following reports. The clerk's 
report, read by Mrs. Constance P. Chipman, 
clerk pro-tem, in the absence of Mrs. Susan 
Hildreth Goodwin. The treasurer's report 
was read by Miss Marion McPherson, in the 
absence of Mrs. Laura Cheever Downs. The 
report of the auditor was read and ac- 
cepted. 

The executive secretary, Miss McPherson, 
spoke of her work in the alumnae office, 
with special emphasis on the generous re- 
sponse of the alumnae to the Second Century 
Alumnae Fund, the sum of Si 606.60 having 
been contributed to date. The social secre- 
tary, Mrs. Chipman, urged alumnae to send 
more personal news for the Bulletin, and 
also reported the activities of the Abbot 
Clubs. The list of thirty alumnae whose 
deaths had been reported during the year 
was then read. 

The alumnae then greatly enjoyed the 
yearly opportunity of receiving the senior 
class into the Alumnae Association. Follow- 
ing the ceremony of presentation by Miss 
Hearsey, and acceptance by the president of 
the Alumnae Association, all alumnae new 
and old, joined in singing ' 'Abbot Beautiful.' ' 
It was inspiring to see the attractive gradu- 
ates, who soon would be taking their places 
and responsibilities as active alumnae. 

The highlight of the meeting was Miss 
Hearsey 's enjoyable report on the state of 
the school. She closed her talk with an invi- 
tation to the alumnae to be the guests of 
the school at the Saturday night dinner. 

Mrs. Polly Bullard Holden, Alumna 
Trustee, in a brief report, gave some hitherto 
unreported details of school activities. In 
closing she expressed the regret of all in the 
absence of Margaret Van Voorhis. 

Mrs. Kennedy then called for the reports 
from the chairmen of the reunion classes. 

1889 was represented by Mrs. Annis 
Spencer Gilbert. The fifty-five year class 
was notable as it had two granddaughters 
in the senior class. Elizabeth Rich, grand- 



daughter of Mrs. Gilbert, and daughter of 
Helen Gilbert Rich, 191 4; and Nancy 
Emerson, granddaughter of Lilian Ellis 
Emerson. The other members present were: 
Lilian Ellis Emerson, E. Kathleen Jones, 
Alice Newton Judd, Flora Mason and 
Martha Hart Moore. 

1894, the fifty-year class had three repre- 
sentatives, Ida Cushing, Myra Hayes, and 
Marian Lees. 

1899 na d one member, Lilian Mooers 
Smith, present. 

1904, the forty year class held an enthusi- 
astic reunion. Especial guests at their lunch- 
eon were Miss Nellie Mason, and Mrs. 
Mabel Bacon Ripley. Those present were: 
Helen Abbott Allen, Beatrice Gunter Dab- 
ney, Sally Field, Helen B. French, Julia 
Wallace Gage, Emily Stearns Giese, Mary 
Davis Lee, Bess Winsor Pettit and Mary 
Byers Smith. 

1909, Janet Gorton spoke for the three 
present, Marjorie Hills Allen, Edith Gard- 
ner Merriam, and Hannah Haines Webb. 

1 9 1 4, the thirty year class had three repre- 
sentatives, Elsie Gleason Buckingham, Helen 
Gilbert Rich, whose daughter Elizabeth 
was in the graduating class, and Alice 
Sweeney. 

1 91 9, the twenty-five year class always 
makes a special effort for reunion, and their 
day was most successful. Present were: Mary 
Button Allen, Jane Holt Atkinson, Cora 
Erickson Ayers, Grace Leyser Boynton, 
Frances Moses Cheever, Mildred Frost 
Eaton, Marea Blackford Fowler, Beth New- 
ton King, and Elizabeth Sjostrom Thomson. 

1924, Polly Bullard Holden and Ruth 
Kelley Perry met for their twentieth reunion. 

1929, Lois Hardy Daloz reported for the 
nine who attended their fifteenth reunion. 
Katherine Kennedy Beardsley, Beth Os- 
borne Honeyman, Barbara Folk Howe, 
Roberta Kendall Kennedy, Polly Francis 
Loesch, Virginia Gay d'Elseaux, Peg 
Neville Batchelder, and Katherine Blunt 
Polsby. 

1934, Their tenth reunion brought back 
six members: Mary Moore Gustafsoa, Sally 
O'Reilly Loria, Frances Heffernan Moore, 



Ada Carlson Prescott, Katharine Damon 
Reed, Peggy Morrill Wilkins. 

1939, Carol Parker Armour, Barbara 
Bobst Judge and Virginia Rice met for their 
fifth reunion. 

1943, The first year reunion was well at- 
tended, those present being Mimi Beckman, 
Peggy Bennett, Catherine Feeney, Elizabeth 
Garratt, Ann Hoyt, Marjorie Lehmann, 
Cornelia McMurray, Anne Pearson, and 
Louise Swenning Weinrich. 

The report of the nominating committee 
was given by the chairman, Mrs. Mildred 
Frost Eaton. The clerk was empowered to 
cast one vote, and the following officers 
were declared elected for the years 1944- 
1946. President, Mrs. Roberta Kendall 
Kennedy; Vice-presidents, Mrs. Virginia 
Gay d'Elseaux, Mrs. Gwendolyn Bloomfield 
Tillson, Mrs. Edith Johnson Donald; Clerk, 
Mrs. Susan Hildreth Goodwin; Treasurer, 
Mrs. Laura Cheever Downs; Remaining in 
office, the Social Secretary, Mrs. Constance 
Parker Chipman; Executive Secretary, Miss 
Marion R. McPherson. 

Mrs. Kennedy then expressed the apprecia- 
tion of the Association to the Tea and Flower 
Committee, who made the Alumnae Head- 
quarters very attractive. Chairman, Mrs. 
Frances McTernen Coan, Mrs. Barbara 
Healey Holland, Mrs. Gisela Bolten Hogan, 
and Mrs. Barbara Lord Mathias. 

The meeting was then declared adjourned 
until next year, and the alumnae met for 
refreshments at the Alumnae Headquarters. 



TREASURER'S REPORT* 



1 943- 1 944 




Receipts 




June 1, 1943 




Balance in Andover National 




Bank 


$600.31 


Received from Bazaar for United 




Nations 


42.60 


Interest from Invested Fund 


251-56 


Check for Centennial Plates 


3-75 


Check from past faculty member 


5.00 


Refund on Secretary's travelling 




expenses 


6.00 


Total receipts 


$909.22 


Expenditures 




American Alumni Council dues 


$30 . 00 


American Alumni Council Hand- 




book 


3-5o 


Andover Press, 600 cards 


7.00 


Copy of 1943 Year Book 


3-75 


Commencement Tea 


2.50 


Senior Coffee party 


10.00 


Alumnae Secretary's expenses 


to 


Abbot Clubs 


42.75 


Total expenditures 


99-5o 


Balance in Andover National 




Bank 


$809.72 



Totai $909.22 

Respectfully submitted, 
Laura Cheever Downs, 

Treasurer 
*This report is condensed for publication. 



Abbot Alumnae in War Services 



WACS 

Anne Cleveland '33 
Edith Keller '30 
Madeleine Proctor '38 
Christine Robinson '40 
Dorothy Walworth '38 
Muriel Baker Wood ' 1 5 

WAVES 

Isabel Arms '32 

Frances Howard O'Brien '25 

Patricia Pierpont '42 

Helen Ripley '30 

Grace S. Vibberts '37 

Winifred Wiglesworth '40 

{This list includes all who are so far known 

10 



WAFS 

Kip Humphrey '36 

MARINES 

Joan Belden '41 
Helen Craig '42 

RED CROSS OVERSEAS 

Barbara Bellows '39 
Charlotte Boynton '37 
Charlotte Gowing Cooper ' 1 1 
Louise Hyde '28 
Annette Robin '33 
Mary V. Spaulding '40 
Ella Stonebraker Bennett '27 
to the Alumnae Office. Please report additional names.) 



Abbot Clubs 



BOSTON (1892): President Miss Irene 
At wood, 6 Lanark Rd., Brookline; Vice- 
presidents, Mrs. Gwendolyn Bloomfield Till- 
son, Mrs. Elizabeth Whitaker Warren; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. Ruth Baker Johnson; 
Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Marion Ireland 
Conant; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Nay Gram- 
kow; Auditor, Mrs. Helen Allen Henry; Pro- 
gram Chairman, Mrs. Ruth Tyler Smith; 
Directors (1943- 1945), Mrs. Elizabeth Sage 
Batchelder, Mrs. Faith Chipman Parker, 
Mrs. Alice Schultz Valkenburgh; Directors 
(1944- 1 946), Mrs. Katherine Allen Babson, 
Mrs. Martha E. Ransom Tucker, Priscilla 
Richards. 

A meeting will be held November 1 8 at the 
College Club, at 2 P.M. Coffee-dessert, fol- 
lowed by speaker. 

CHICAGO ( 1 92 1 ) : President, Mrs. J. Allen 
Lind (Mary Simpson); Secretary, Mrs. Edith 
Bullen Creeden, 461 Hill Rd., Winnetka; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Hall Walker. 

CONNECTICUT (1923): President, Miss 
Sara Peck, 20 Fairview Ter., Derby; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Lawton Cheney, 
36 Morse St., Hamden. 

DETROIT (1922): President, Mrs. Thom- 
as Nalle (Harriet Balfe) ,1211 Willow Lane, 
Birmingham. 

MAINE, EASTERN (1926): President, 
Miss Eleanor Bird, 250 Broadway, Rockland; 
Vice-President, Mrs. Frances McDougall Mc- 
Loon; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Annetta 
Richards Bryant, Round Pond. 

MAINE, WESTERN (1922): President, 
Mrs. Harold Robinson (Harriette Woolver- 
ton), Cape Elizabeth; Treasurer, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Baldwin Frohock, 



NEW YORK (1898) : President, Miss Char- 
lotte Dane 1936, 21 East 37th St., New 
York City; Vice-Presidents, Mrs. Eunice 
Meigs Pease 1921, Miss Gertrude Holbrook 
1925; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Ruth Cann 
Baker 1931; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Despina 
Plakias Messinesi 1929; Treasurer, Miss 
Charlotte Boynton; Directors, Mrs. Helga 
Lundin Buttrick 1923, Mrs. Laura Scudder 
Williamson 1924, Mrs. Helen Bradley 
Hodgkinson 191 9. 

The Fall meeting will be held on Novem- 
ber 25. 

OHIO, CENTRAL (1921): President, 
Secretary, Mrs. Paul Meek (Louise Norpell), 
5600 Meek Rd., Worthington. 

OHIO, CLEVELAND (1927): President, 
Mrs. George Worthington (Madeleine Fiske), 
Chesterland, Ohio. 

A supper party meeting was held at the 
home of Mrs. Clara Hukill Leeds, on Octo- 
ber 5. Besides the election of a new president, 
the past president, Mrs. Dorothy Gilbert 
Bellows received many good wishes on her 
move to Chicago, and her daughter, Barbara, 
'39, received gifts of bits of equipment to 
help on her Red Cross overseas duties. 

OLD COLONY (1924): President, Mrs. 
Richard M. Thompson (Ruth Niles), 300 
Woodlawn St., Fall River; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Mrs. Louise Thompson Cor tr ell, 
372 Madison St., Fall River. 

A meeting will be held October 26, at the 
Taunton Inn. Hostesses: Mrs. Mabel Rhodes 
Manter, Miss Flora Mason. 

PITTSBURGH (1921): President, Mrs. 
George H.Jackson (Gertrude Miller), Butler, 
Pa.; Secretary, Mrs. Joseph M. Browne (Eliza 
Atwell), 529 Pine Rd., Sewickley. 



II 




Class Reunion 

MAY 27, 1944 I 

Top to bottom; left: i88g, i8g4, 1904M 
igog. Right: igig, ig2g, ig34, and ig4* 



(See A 



■\ %Nf: 



■MaS. *5»> 




% m 



w 



Jto&l* 




Class Reunions, May 2j, 1944 

(See photographs on pages 12 and 13) 

1889 
Left to right: Annis Spencer Gilbert, Alice Newton Judd, Martha Hart Moore, Flora Mason, 
Lilian Ellis Emerson, Kathleen Jones. 

1894 
Left to right: Ida Cushing, Myra Hayes, Marion G. Lees. 

1904 
Left to right: top row: Bess Winsor Pettit, Emily Stearns Giese, Julia Wallace Gage, Sarah Field, 
Helen French, Mary Byers Smith, Helen Abbott Allen, Beatrice Gunter Dabney. Lower 
row: Mary Davis Lee, Mabel Bacon Ripley, Nellie Mason. 

1909 
Left to right: Marjorie Hills Allen, Janet Gorton, Hannah Haines Webb, Edith Gardner Merriam. 

1919 

Left to right: Jane Holt Atkinson, Cora Erickson Ayers, Mary Button Allen, Marea Blackford 

Fowler, Elizabeth S;ostrom Thomson, Millie Frost Eaton, Grace Leyser Boynton, Frances 
Moses Cheever, Beth Newton King. 

1929 
Left to right: Betty Brown Guild, Katherine Blunt Polsby, Barbara Folk Howe, Marguerite 

Neville Batchelder, Lois Hardy Daloz, Katherine Kennedy Beardsley, Beth Osborne Honey- 
man, Polly Francis Loesch, Roberta Kendall Kennedy. 

1934 
Left to right, top row: Peggy Morrill Wilkins, Mabel Savage Van Stone, Ada Carlson Prescott. 

Lower row: Katharine Damon Reed, Mary Moore Gustafson, Sally O'Reilly Loria. 

1943 
Left to right, top row: Peggy Bennett, Cornelia McMurray, Anne Pearson, Elizabeth Garratt. 

Lower row: Ann Hoyt, Louise Swenning Weinrich, Mary Alice Beckman, Catherine 

Feeney, Marjorie Lehmann. 

Note : Copies of the class photographs may be ordered through the Alumnae Office. 



In Memoriam 



Past Faculty 



Mrs. Ruth Thayer Burnham, wife of the 
Rev. Dr. Edmund A. Burnham, died on May 
10, in Essex, following a long illness. Pos- 
sessed of a beautiful mezzo-soprano voice 
she was an outstanding singer of her time. 
For twelve years, 1922 to 1934, she was the 
vocal teacher at Abbot. Keen minded, alert 
and lover of young people she was known 
as "Mother Burnham." One son, Robert, 
married Winifred Dudley, Abbot 1928. 
They have four children, of whom Dr. 
Burnham writes, "The grandchildren all 
have the gift of voice and song, a beautiful 
inheritance, and an abiding love and ad- 
miration for their grandmother." 

Mrs. Gladys Brannigan, teacher of Art at 
Abbot from 1936 to 1937, died on April 24, 
in New York City. 



1872 



Eva Myrtella Whitcomb, widow of S. 
Ripley Bartlett, died on July 4, in Concord. 

1878 

Elizabeth George, widow of William A. 
Burns, died on August 1 7, in Danvers. 

1889 

Alice Conant, wife of Fred T. Wadleigh, 
died on June 4, in Milford, N. H. 

1883 

Katherine Prichard, widow of Dr. William 
H. Hoyt, died on June 1 , in Wenham. 

Martha O. Coffin died on August 10, in 
Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

1911 

Bessie May Rand, wife of Charles Waldo 
Morrison, died June 5, in New York City. 
She was the sister of Ethel Rand, 1913. 



14 



Class News 



1883 

Edwin A. Bayley, husband of Lucia Wat- 
kins, died on June 13. 

1886 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frank W. 
Darling (Mary Gorton), Hampton, Virginia. 

1860-1891 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Ernest C. 
Young (Ruth Childs), 6 Emerson St., 
Brookline. 

1889 
Fifty-Fifth Reunion 

Of the fifteen members who graduated in 
1889, ten are still living, which we consider 
a remarkable record. To be sure, our eye- 
sight is dimmed, also our hearing; we have 
fewer teeth and we walk with canes, and 
somehow we can't remember things as we 
used to, but we still are indomitable in 
spirit, and in loyalty to Abbot traditions. 

Four of our graduates were present at this 
reunion: Lilian Ellis Emerson, Kathleen 
Jones, Annis Spencer Gilbert, Martha Hart 
Moore; and two non-graduates: Alice 
Newton Judd and Flora Mason. We deeply 
regretted the absence of our beloved presi- 
dent, Mary Peabody, who also was unable 
to be present at our 50th reunion, and of 
"Mollie" Hutchings, Evalena French Ander- 
son, Alice Joy Arms, Edith Jackson Lewis and 
Dora Mason McLaughlin. Her husband, 
James B. McLaughlin died on September 5. 
The last named lives in California and 
transportation was impossible. The others 
were kept at home for various reasons, May 
and Mollie by failing eyesight, Edith, by the 
illness of her husband, Gen. Lewis. 

Our twelve married graduates have pro- 
duced more than forty grandchildren. In- 
cidentally two of these graduated from 
Abbot at this 1944 Commencement; Nancy 
Emerson and Elizabeth Gilbert Rich. 

Of the three unmarried members, Mary 
Peabody and Mary Hutchings have influ- 
enced as teachers forty-five or fifty years of 
pupils, and are retired on well-earned pen- 
sions; Mary Peabody from Teachers College, 
Columbia University and Mary Hutchings 
from the Bangor, Maine, High School. The 
third, Kathleen Jones, has retired from 
forty-five years of library work, during part 



of which she was pioneer in institution 
library service. She is the author of two books 
on hospital, and one on prison libraries. 

Quite out of the ordinary is the service 
conducted by Alice Joy Arms' daughter, 
Betty and her husband, Dr. John McKee 
Olds, who are carrying on almost single- 
handed at present, a one hundred bed hos- 
pital at Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland, a 
remote place and the only hospital for many, 
many miles. Betty is a trained nurse and not 
only assists her husband in the hospital, 
cares for their little family, but goes on long 
dog-sled rides in the winter to aid the sick 
and suffering inhabitants of this cold and 
remote country. 

It goes without saying that most of us are 
more or less active in Red Cross and other 
war relief work. We have six sons and at 
least five grandsons in the various services, to 
say nothing of seven nephews and grand- 
nephews of two of our unmarried graduates. 

In closing this report we pay tribute to 
the memory of Lizzie Ryder Stiles, who was 
with us at our happy Fiftieth reunion, but 
who passed away December 14, 1940. The 
years take toll of us, but we who are left 
draw closer together. 

Annis Spencer Gilbert 

Reunion Chairman 

1891 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Charles E. 
Townsend (Lena Hinchman), 37 LeRoy 
Place, Newburgh, New York. 

1892 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane B. Car- 
penter, School St., Andover. 

Charles P. Carter, husband of Emily 
Staats, died on May 3, in Glastonbury, 
Conn. 

1893 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Harry R. 
Miles (Anna Nettleton) , 4 Rockledge Drive, 
Stamford, Conn. 

Dr. Lombard C. Jones, husband of Nina 
Dutton, died on August 1 7, in Falmouth. 

1894 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Doremus 
Scudder (Mabel Bosher), 133 West 9th St., 
Claremont, California. 



15 



1895 

Frances Edwards Quayle had as her guest 
on her ranch in Hayward, California, 
Louise Nor pell Meek. 

Grace Simonton Young gave an Abbot tea 
in her home in Camden, Maine, this sum- 
mer. Present were: Miss Dorothy Hopkins, 
former librarian at Abbot, Betty Babb Fox- 
well and Frances McDougall McLoon. 

1896 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Henry V. 
Conant (Ruth Loring), 914 High St., Ded- 
ham. 

Sara Jackson Smith's grandson has com- 
pleted his basic training in the Air Corps. 

Carol Mathews Mohn and her husband 
spent the summer at Buck Hill Falls, Penn. 

Grace Pearson Preston's son, Com. Alex- 
ander Preston, has been in the S. W. Pacific 
for over a year. He has been on several 
different islands and has had wonderful ex- 
perience, as his hospitals have been equipped 
with splendid operating rooms. 

1897 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Alexander 
Bunce (Gertrude Ware), R.F.D. 1, Rock- 
ville, Conn. 

1898 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert W. 
Dunbar (Selina Cook), 362 Danforth St., 
Portland, Maine. 

Nellie Flint Rand is chairman of Produc- 
tion at the Andover Red Cross Head- 
quarters. She has two grandchildren, one to 
each son; Lee Abbott Rand, four, and Susan 
Appleton Rand, eleven months old. 

Edith Tyer McFayden has a small grand- 
daughter. 

A recent issue of the New York "Times 
Magazine, in an article on play equipment 
for children gives suggestions from Sara 
Patrick, as an authority on the subject. 
Miss Patrick, long an instructor in Industrial 
Arts at Teachers College, Columbia, was 
one of the prime movers in the organization 
of the Industrial Arts Cooperative Service in 
New York, and is now president of that 
organization. A few years ago she wrote an 
article for the Bulletin, on the importance 
of broadening one's outlook and interests by 
becoming acquainted with different peoples 
and their cultures, and thus gaining a sense 
of belonging to a world society. 



1899 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Brainerd E. 
Smith (Lilian Mooers), 116 East St., Me- 
thuen. 

1900 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur P. 
Spear (Grace Chapman), 156 Winchester 
St., Brookline. 

1901 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Helen Hale, 
86 Knox St., Lawrence. 

Mrs. Caroline Flagg Emerson, widow of 
Dean Charles F. Emerson of Dartmouth 
College, and mother of Emily Emerson Day, 
died on August 12, in Hanover, N. H. 

1902 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Hezekiah 
Poore (Mildred Mooers), 37 Ames St., 
Lawrence. 

Miriam Carpenter, who resigned as Dean 
at Wheaton College last spring, received a 
most appreciative testimonial in the Wheaton 
Alumnae Quarterly. We quote briefly, "Any 
general definition can give no hint of the 
warmth and kindliness, the wisdom and 
patience, the humor and spriteliness of this 
friendly person who for fifteen years has pre- 
sided over the southeast corner of the first 
floor Administration Building, .... She has 
given us her well-considered counsel, has 
stood by her decisions, and has won in re- 
turn our respect." 

Catherine Deacon Palmer's husband, Hon. 
Victor Claude Palmer, died on September, 

!943- 

Margaret Eshbaugh Adam's husband, 
Charles H. Adams, died on May 15. Mrs. 
Adams has moved from Portland to Vir- 



ginia. 



1904 



Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. William O. 
Pettit (Elizabeth Winsor), 186 Livingston 
Ave., New Brunswick, N. J. 

Lawrence Allen, husband of Helen Ab- 
bott, died suddenly on June 9. He was the 
father of Helen Allen Henry 1932. 

1906 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Evaline Korn, 
37 LeRoy Place, Newburgh, New York. 

Molly Jordan Goodrich's daughter Joan, 
was married on July 29, to Frederic Allison 
Lang, in Newburgh, N. Y. 

Persis Mackintire Carr's son, Lt. (j.g.) Win- 
throp Carr, was married to Alice Skelton, 
on May 13, in College Park, Maryland. 



16 



Sarah Hincks' mother, Mrs. Edward Y. 
Hincks, died in Tuscon, Arizona, on June 8. 

Rena Porter Hastings is enjoying her first 
grandchild, Lawrence Porter Hastings Jr., 
born May 18. Hudson Jr. is a Lt. with the 
Ordnance Dept. of the navy. Lawrence has 
been overseas since August. 

1907 

Mabel Rhodes Manter was elected in the 
spring, president of the Taunton Woman's 
Club. 

, Louise Richards Rollins' youngest daugh- 
ter, Sydney, has joined the Marines. 

1908 

Esther Parker Lovett's daughter Eugenia 
was married on September 21, to Lt. Eric 
Fowler West, AAF. 

1909 

Agnes Bertha Ewart has retired as Resi- 
dence Director at the H. H. McCormick 
Memorial Residence of the Y.W.C.A., in 
Chicago, and is now living in Washington, 
D. C. 

Louise Norpell Meek is now president of 
the Central Ohio Abbot Club. Her younger 
daughter Emily Bradley has entered Pratt 
Institute in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Edith Gardner Merriam's husband George 
H. Merriam, and her father Fred L. Gard- 
ner, died within twenty minutes of each 
other August 7, at their summer home, 
Dennysville, Maine. 

Frances Wright Kimball's son, Frederick, 
has been discharged from the Canadian 
army according to agreement entered into 
with the U.S. army. 

1910 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Myron G. 
Darby (Ethel Reigeluth), no Tanglewylde 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Dora Heys Pym's daughter Constance, 
was married to Maurice B. Weiss, on Sep- 
tember 16, at Topsfield. 

1911 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Douglas 
Donald (Edith Johnson), 8 Carisbrooke 
St., Andover. 

1912 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Joseph L. 
Hyde (Ruth Draper), Kenmore Rd., 
Bloomfield, Conn. 



1913 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Margaret 
Wilkins, 279 North Euclid Ave., Pasadena, 
California. 

1915 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Eugene 
Bernardin (Mary Flynn), n Abbot St., 
Andover. 

1916 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. James E. 
Downs (Laura Cheever), Andover. 

Esther Kilton acted as secretary at Eu- 
genia Parker's camp this summer, and the 
daughters of Marion Selden Nash and Emma 
Stohn Larrabee, were campers. 

Esther Van Dervoort Howe's daughter 
Mary, has entered Abbot this Fall. 

Dorothy Pillsbury Bartlett has three sons 
in the service. Richard Jr., Ensign USNR 
Air Corps, was married to Frances Fisher, 
October 6, 1943, in California. Joseph is 
V12 Cornell University, and Thomas is an 
Aviation Cadet at Colgate College. 

1917 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Oliver D. 
Westcott (Dorothy Small), 84 Main St., 
Nantucket. 

Mildred Daniels Cary write? that she has 
two sons in the service, one in the Army 
Medical Corps, and one a Midshipman in 
the navy. In spite of all she is doing in Red 
Cross activities she says, "I find as I look 
back over the years, that the time I spent 
at Abbot was really one of the happiest, and 
most worthwhile events in my life." 

Dorothy Small Westcott 's daughter Jane 
Tomlinson, is a junior at Wheelock College. 

1918 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George J. 
Cutler (Velma Rowell), 45 Eliot St., 
Jamaica Plain. 

Martha Grace Miller Reese's daughter, 
Phoebe, has gone to the school where her 
mother taught years ago. 

Margaret Speer is the new principal of the 
Shipley School for Girls in Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Margaret Van Voorhis resigned in June, 
her position with the Katharine Gibbs 
School, in order to more intensively pursue 
her vocal study. She is at present located in 
New York City where she is coaching with 
Coenraad V. Bos, internationally known 
musical authority. 



17 



1919 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Grace L. 
Boynton v Grace Leyser), 30 Engle St., 
Tenafly, Xew Jersey. 

Married: Joyce Graham to Mr. Frederick 
H. Taylor. Address: 817 Prince St.. Alex- 
andria. Virginia, 

Harriet San/or J Stuart's son "Chip." is 
attending Governor Du miner School: Bill 
is somewhere in the South Pacific in the 
army Amphibian Command, and Margaret 
'42. is at Katharine Gibbs in Xew York. 

1920 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Beverly R. 
Hubbard (Muriel Moxley), 334 West 
Emerson St.. Melrose. 

Virginia Miller Smucker's daughter Sally, 
has entered Br\-n Mawr. 

1921 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. David H. 
Bigelow (Marion Kimball), 326 Highland 
St.. West Newton. 

1922 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. Evans 
Kephart (Ruth Hill), 3 Weatherby Rd., 
Hanover. X'. H. 

Married: Sally Bodwell to Charles Leon 
Houghton, April 29. in Andover. 

Barbara Goss is teaching at the Winsor 
School in Boston. 

1924 
Twentieth Reunion 

Only two members were present at the 
reunion luncheon. Polly Billiard Holden 
and Ruth Kellex Perry, but the following 
news was received via letters and telegrams. 

Laura Bliss Alexander -wrote. ' ' I doubtless 
look every minute of my thirty-eight years, 
but I feel younger than I did at eighteen!" 

Kay Hart Mitchell says she and her hus- 
band. Lt. Col. Mitchell have '"had glorious 
fun and experiences travelling all over the 
country. He is now somewhere in England.'"'' 

Genevra Rumford reports she is very busy- 
as Navy Inspector and family cook. 

Messages also came from, Helen Epler 
Baketel. Ethel Thompson James and Marjorie 
Wolfe Staples. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. John 
Holden Pollv Bullard . Middleburv. Ver- 



mont. 



1925 



Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George B. 



Beveridge ^Charlotte Hanna), Sanfordtown 
Rd., Redding, Conn. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Marsh 
(Dorothy Beeley^ a daughter, Jacqueline 
Gilman. March 19. Roland Bradstreet is 
five years old. 

1926 

Adelaide Black is Director of the Kathar- 
ine Gibbs School in New York City. Her 
father died on August 18. 

Born: to Mr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Weld 
Anne Sutton), a son, September 20. 

1927 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Stuart R. 
Stone (Xancv KimbalP, R.F.D. 4. Laconia, 
X. H. 

Eleanor Bird attended courses at Boston 
L'niversity during the summer. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Carter 
(Pauline Humeston\. a third child and 
second son. Thomas Benedict, July 15. 

Ella Stone brake r Bennett, has arrived in 
Australia to serve as an American Red 
Cross assistant. 

1928 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Emily Sloper, 
36 Russell St.. Xew Britain, Conn. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Stephen G. Wil- 
liamson Jr. (Eleanor Leech") their third 
child, and second son. Robert Leech, May 
16. Stephen 3rd, is six, and Ann two and a 
half years old. 

Patty Snell Johnson has returned to Cairo 
to be with her husband. 

1929 
Fifteenth Reunion 

Hello. 29*ers! We had fun! 

Eight of us held an exclusive gab-fest 
and we had a grand reunion! Did your ears 
burn? We talked over everyone and ex- 
changed gossip as fast and furiously as 
possible. 

Barbara Folk Howe and I arrived at 
Alumnae Headquarters about noon after 
having a delightful visit at her home in 
Lowell. First to greet us was Polly Francis 
Loesch, fresh back from Florida where she 
spent the winter with her twin imps, while 
her Chaplain husband sojourned in England. 
Then came Peg .Xeiille Batchelder looking 
young as a kitten with her feathercut hairdo. 
She and her two youngsters a boy 6 1 o and 
a girl 3 1 2 make their home in Weymouth, 
since Ed went over in a Landing Barge to be 



18 



in on the Invasion. Before lone our group 
enlarged to include Kay Kennedy Bearc 
Roberta Kendall Kennedy; and Beth 0> 
£/?r/z£ Honeyman. By the time we arrived at 

Mr-.. Chiprnan's for a very sumptuous 
luncheon. Kay £/wn* Polsby had joined as. 
Ovei our coffee cups we decided Kay Ken- 
nedy wears yellow just as becomingly as she 
did fifteen years ago in spite of her three 
children, two girls and a boy, age o*. 6 and 
one years old. Incidentally, her hair is still 
as golden as ever. 

Beth Osborne had us all giggling as she 
described her daily antics with three young- 
sters, all under five. Kay Blunt left two rollick- 
ing boys at home on the farm in Connecticut 
just so she could be in on the fun. As for 
Roberta Kendall, she is our pride and joy. 
Every : 2^er would have been proud to 
watch her gracious charm and ability as she 
led the Annual Meeting of the Alumnae 
Association and took office for her second 
term. We are proud to belong in her class! 

Your answering letters to my card were 
passed around the table. Here are excerpts 
from some: Joyce Jarman McXamara says, 
"Say Hello to all the class from me — I'll 
make the next one or bust." Fran Cobb, 
"The Russell family is all in one piece as yet 
but we are waiting for the draft board to 
catch up. Living in Ohio is too far from the 
East coast to suit me." Barbara Elliott 
Tevepaugh, "Maybe at the tender age of 70 
I'll come along — my little Ann is too much 
of a load now to take travelling." Margaret 
Estes Seamans from Marblehead, "Two 
little hellions aged 4 and 63^ named Betty 
and John, plus no maid and a dribble of gas 
make Andover look a long ways off." Betty 
Jane Osborne Bacon, "My Anne is almost 4 
and we now have a son Dennison, 7 months 
old. Both are enormous, they take after me, 
'Abbot size'!" Harriet Gilmore Yoh reports — 
"Our move to Jersey after eight years in 
Ohio — have seen Jane Linn Gale, Fran Cobb 
Russell, Olive Elsey Weigle, and lunched 
with Estelle Levering Chestnut, so I haven't 
lost complete contact with fair '29." Bettina 
Rollins Wheeler says, "Am trying to get to 
Washington to join Coburn who is in the 
Bureau of Aeronautics, Publications Section. 
Everyone is there. Why shouldn't I join the 
throng and struggle to buy Kleenex and 
carrots?" Ginny Drake Hubbard, ' 'Wish with 
all my heart I could be in Andover but no 
soap this year. Travelling is so difficult and 



help so Kara mail boys, 3 and 

keep me busy at home most of the time. My 
husband is an 'old man' by army standards, 
but is busy in defense work at the Hubbard 
Spring Co.. where Jeaxmette is also working 
very hard and long. I would be so hap 7, U 
see any of you who have occasion to come 
Detroit." Mary MacDonald, "I might report 
that thus far I have escaped 'false teeth and 
cane.' - I could bring some grey hairs. Perhaps 
it could be said that I remain in one pi a 
at least in exceeding good health, unmarried 
and without prospects. I am on the faculty 
of the School of Social Service Administra- 
tion of the University of Chicago." Eleanor 
Jones Bennett from East Orange. "Roger is 
down with the measles, and Patricia is 
coughing tonight so I am afraid going to 
reunion is just out this time." Despina 
Plakias Messinisi from New York City, "If 
only I could make it and lead my '29 class 
in song I would be so very happy, but I am 
still a loyal member 'spite it'. My mother 
is with me now, I still work at Vogue, and 
if my class reads it they'll find me in print 
in the April 15 issue. My brother is now in 
London with the Dept. of State. From my 
husband in Greece I have not heard for 
almost a year. All good luck, good wishes to 
my class. I will send self-addressed cards to 
whoever wants to write me, and I promise 
to answer promptly." 

From Jo-Jo — '"'Dear Lois and All Fair'^ers : 
I have put off writing till the last minute in 
the hope that I might get back for our 1 5th, 
but I find it impossible. Life, at the moment, 
for me, as for most people, is rather hectic. 
My husband has been in the army for a year 
and a half. Mother came to live with me, 
and with the help of a hired man we ran the 
farm. In August I went to the west coast to 
be with my husband at several camps, then 
returned in December. While I was away 
the man left, and we had to sell our cows, 
horses and goats. Now. Mother and I are 
taking care of the pigs and chickens, not to 
mention dogs, cats, an acre of vegetables, 
and acre of lawn, flowers, etc. We're busy 
and bed looks awfully good at night. I wish 
I could be with you all, good luck and best 
wishes, let's hope by our 20th we'll have 
peace again." 

We were disappointed that several who 
had hoped to come did not appear. We 
looked for Louise Tobey Dean and Betty 
Mac Grouse. Betty's husband is awaiting his 



19 



call from the Navy, and Gwen Jones Ham- 
lin's husband is a Captain in the Air Force. 
Betty Taylor Amazeen had to change plans 
the last minute. She holds the home front 
together in South Hanson, with her three 
small youngsters, while her husband is in the 
Navy. That's all the news, ladies. Now it's 
your turn. Where's Cleone? Kay Bowden? 
How about 'Lish and May Eaton, Charlotte 
Osgood, Millicent, and all the rest of you 
who haven't peeped yet? Send a card to 
Mrs. Chipman and me. We've had a good 
start so let's keep it up! 

Lois Hardy Daloz 
Reunion Chairman 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Parker Honeyman 
(Elizabeth Osborne) their fourth child, and 
second son, Douglas McGregor, July 7. 

Mrs. Olive Wakefield Warden, mother of 
Olive Warden Schenninger, died on April 2 1 , 
in Andover. A recent letter from Olive, 
written from Grenoble, France, the day after 
the American forces arrived, spoke of the 
strict rationing of food and supplies. To 
satisfy the eager demand for learning Eng- 
lish, she kept busy teaching several courses 
in the University of Grenoble. Her daughter, 
Patricia was four years old in July. 

1930 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Jack R. War- 
wick (Mary Jane Owsley), 26 Ledgewood 
Rd., Bronxville, New York. 

Elenita Cowee Chickering's husband is Lt. 
(j.g.), USNR. She has three children, 
Howell Jr. six, Elizabeth two and a half, and 
Nancy, one year old. 

Barbara Loud Mathias has begun her work 
as Dean at Western College, Oxford, Ohio. 

Barbara Smith Depenbrock has two chil- 
dren, Ann, four and a half, and John, fourteen 
months old. 

1931 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Francis Hol- 
land (Barbara Graham), 218 West Marion 
St., South Bend, Indiana. 

Nancy Carr Holmes' husband is with a 
parachute reigment. She and her year old 
son are living with her mother. 

1932 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Dorothy 
Richardson, Boston Rd., Billerica. 

Lt. (j.g.) Isabel Arms has been trans- 
ferred to Norfolk, Va., to be Disbursing 
Officer for the Supervisory Cost Inspector, 
5th Naval District. 



Born: To Rev. and Mrs. M. Gray Blandy 
(Anne Dudley) a daughter, Deborah Anne, 
April 18. Christopher is several years old. 
Mr. Blandy has charge of two Episcopal 
parishes in Houston, Texas. 

Lucile LeVine Fairbanks writes that her 
husband 1st Lt. Hartley C. Fairbanks was 
killed in August in action in France. She is 
living in South Portland, Maine, with her 
year old son, Stephen, and teaching at 
Fryeburg Academy. 

Dorothy Reinhart Cornell's husband, Rich- 
ard W., died suddenly in Canada, on July 2. 

Hilda Lynde Wylie and her small son are 
living in Andover, while her husband is 
overseas. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Daniel F. Sullivan 
(Clare O'Connell) a son, Paul Michael. 

1933 

Margaret Chase Johnson writes from Cal- 
ifornia that her husband has not yet gone 
overseas, but they live "from day to day." 

Born, To Prof, and Mrs. Harry L. 
Hanson (Carolyn Guptil) a son, Jeffrey 
Northedge, April 22. 

Born: To Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. Richard 
Gay Cady (Elizabeth Snyder) their fourth 
child, and second son. 

Mar go Walker has a defense job with the 
Polaroid Corp. in Cambridge, and is also 
doing volunteer work at the Boston City 
Hospital. 

1934 
Tenth Reunion 

Six members of our class were present at 
our tenth reunion luncheon at Mrs. Chip- 
man's, Saturday, May 27. Kay Damon 
Reed, Peggy Morrill Wilkins, Ada Carlson 
Prescott, Mary Moore Gustafson, Molly 
Savage Van Stone, and Sally O'Reilly Loria. 
After lunch we went to the Annual Meeting 
in Abbot Hall, and later admired the im- 
provements to Draper Hall, the new dining 
room, and library in the new wing. Ada, 
Kay and Sally had a delicious dinner with 
the school, and afterwards went to Draper 
Dramatics, "Twelfth Night." Mary Rock- 
well was there, and we were really taken 
back ten years when the Andover boys, on 
the way home from a victory over Exeter, 
made the same kind of a noisy celebration, 
outside the Abbot gate, as they used to. 

Sally O'Reilly Loria 

Reunion Chairman 



20 



Ada Carlson Prescott is raising apples on 
her farm in Westford, Mass. Katherine 
Damon Reed has the oldest husband, and is 
the first one to have three children, includ- 
ing the class baby. Mary Moore Gustafson 
has three girls, six, four and two years of 
age, and lives in Meriden, Conn. Peggy 
Morrill Wilkins has bought a house in New- 
buryport, built in 1750. Molly Savage Van 
Stone has two children, John, four, and 
Sally, one year old. 

1935 

Betsey Armington Arms' second son, Jona- 
than Foster, was born on October 23, 1943. 

Born: To Capt. and Mrs. John H. 
McClennan (Jane Dawes), a daughter, 
Joanne David, September 17. Capt. Mc- 
Clennan is stationed at Warner Robbins 
Field, Ga. 

Albert H. Chamberlain, father of Barbara 
Chamberlain McCready, died on June 28, in 
Andover. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Edwin H. Goodwin 
(Susan Hildreth) a son, Jonathan Howe, 
August 1 1 . 

Born: To Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. DuToit 
(Eleanor Johnson) their second child, a 
daughter, August 2 . 

Married: Jean Wilson to Lt. (j.g.) Richard 
D. Warren, February 6, 1943. Jean is work- 
ing as secretary at the Andover Townsman 
while her husband is overseas. 

1936 

Engaged: Kathryn Kip Humphreys to 
Ensign John Frederic Requardt Jr., U.S. 
maritime service. 

Born: To Lt. Com. and Mrs. Elwood N. 
Chase (Clara Holland) a second daughter, 
Carolyn, September 19. Susann is three 
years old. 

Anne-Lawrence Dodge is a copywriter in 
the Advertising Department of the Celanese 
Celluloid Corporation, plastics division of 
the Celanese Corp. of America, New York 
City. 

Married: Helen Marie O'Brien to Gage 
Olcott, in Andover, July 8. 

Sylvia Wright Poole brought her lively 
young son to visit Abbot when her sister 
Barbara entered as a new girl. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Walter Chapin 
(Polly Spear) a daughter, Virginia Hart, 
August 18. 



1937 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur W. 
Tucker Jr. (Martha E. Ransom), 632 Great 
Plain Rd., Needham. 

Charlotte Boynton has been accepted 
by the Red Cross as an Overseas Staff 
Assistant, and expects to be in service soon. 

Thelma Cutter received her B.S. from 
Simmons College, and is now working for the 
AAF Statistical School at Harvard. 

Judith Wonson Chamberlain's husband, 
Ensign Allen Chamberlain, died in San 
Diego, Cal. on May 20. Judith has a young 
son Jason. 

1938 

Engaged: Jean Appleby to Lt. Levis W. 
Minford 3rd, AUS. 

Sally Peck is the new president of the 
Connecticut Abbot Club. She is studying 
for her M.A. at Yale University. 

Mary Toohey has accepted a position on 
the faculty at Vassar, as assistant instructor 
in child study. 

Beatrice Tyer has charge of horses and 
riding at Putney School, Putney, Vermont. 

Sgt. Dorothy Walworth is working with 
the army airways communications sys- 
tem in Asheville, North Carolina. 

1939 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. John H. 
Judge (Barbara Bobst), 179 Fairview Ave., 
Belmont. 

Barbara Bellows has been accepted by the 
Red Cross for Overseas duty. 

Married: Muriel Clark to Lt. Lawrence 
William Bunce, Navy Air Corps, July 10. 

Born: To Ensign and Mrs. John Nunez 
(Joyce Curran) a son, Robert Flournoy V, 
August 1. 

Corp. Merrill Green, fiance of Marjorie 
McMullen, died of wounds received in 
France. 

Married: Florence Mooney to Lt. Laur- 
ence Lappin Doty Jr. AAF, June 17, in 
Manchester, N. H. 

Married: Adelle Sawyer to George W. 
Wood, III, USA, September 9, in Yonkers, 
New York. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Patrick O'Hagan 
(Mary Woodman), a second child, a daugh- 
ter, June 14, in Pretoria, Union of South 
Africa. 

1940 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Carl H. 



21 



Bolter (Jane Wilson), Apt. 12, 361 Harvard 
St., Cambridge. 

Married: Elaine Dalrymple to Robert 
H. Borowski, USA, June 28, in Methuen. 

Engaged: Corp. Marguerite Hall to Sgt. 
Roy Yules, USMC. 

Mary Spaulding is with the Red Cross, 
now located in New Guinea as a Staff 
Assistant. 

The May issue of the Connecticut College 
Alumnae News, gave a vivid account of the 
successful musical comedy, "The Island of 
Lolii," for which Elizabeth Travis Sollen- 
berger wrote the music. "It was light, tune- 
ful, vivid and gay," and was a smash hit 
when produced at the college in April. 

Married: Elizabeth Weaver to Ensign 
Landon Hockmeyer, June 7, in North 
Andover. Sally Cole '40, was her maid of 
honor, and honorary attendants were: 
Joyce Curran Nunez '39, Joan Waugh '41, 
and Patricia Arnold '38. 

Married: Marcia Wheeler to Flight 
Officer Walter Cross Falconer AAF. 

Winifred Wiglesworth has joined the Navy, 
hoping to get into the Hospital Corps for 
active service. 

Engaged : Priscilla Williams to Alan Lloyd 
Dorian, USATP. 

1941 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane Parrot, 
30 Ox Bow Lane, Summit, N. J. 

Married: Ruth Bondy to Ensign Lawrence 
Lowy USNR, September 9. 

Joan Belden has joined the Marine Corps. 

Married: Josephine Hartwell to Lt. 
William Westcott Boddington, USA, August 
22, in Colorado Springs. Miriam Calder 
Dunn '41, was the matron of honor. Ad- 
dress: 1930 Wood Ave., Colorado Springs, 
Col. 

Verniece Moody spent the summer doing 
volunteer work in Physiotherapy at Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. This fall she has returned 
to Sargent College, Cambridge as a senior, 
to work for her B.S., and Physiotherapy 
certificate. 

Emily Mills is studying at the Boston 
School of Occupational Therapy. 

Married: Mary Purcell to D. H. Wilson, 
April 3. Address: Strathmore Cottage, 
Pennant Ave., Beachwood, N. J. 



Amelia Shields is spending the fall months 
in Guatemala. 

Engaged: Nancy Whittier to Ralph Massie 
Atchinson, USNR. 

Engaged: Bonney Wilson to Richard 
Andrew Hakanson, USAAF. 

1942 

Sue Bates is Social Chairman of the 
Service League, and Chairman of the War 
Services Committee at Connecticut College 
for '44- '45. 

Married: Ethel Ann Bolton to Lt. (j.g.) 
Charles Henderson Jr. August 15, in North 
Andover. Her sister Harriet Bolton Allen 
'32 was her matron of honor, and brides- 
maids were classmates, Suzanne Bates, 
Margaret Stuart, Marjorie Dean and Betty 
Jean England. The ceremony was performed 
by Rev. Alexander Twombly, husband of 
Barbara Nelson '25. 

Engaged: Louise Clark to Cadet James 
W. Gilland. 

Married: Marjorie Dean to Cpl. Phillips 
Brooks Marsden Jr., September 15, in 
Andover. 

Married: Beatrice Hardy to Lt. (j.g.) 
Francis de Luze Verdery, USNR, July 29, 
in Andover. One of her bridesmaids was 
Helen Barss ,'43. 

Married: Margaret Hill to Captain Harry 
Bell Jr., USA, September 23, in Red Bank, 
N. J. Her sister, Ann, now in Abbot, and 
Sally Zimmermann '42, were bridesmaids. 

Margaret Stuart graduated from Pine 
Manor Junior College, and has entered 
Katharine Gibbs School in New York City. 

1943 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Marion 
Burdine, Hollins College, Virginia. 

Helen Barss has transferred from Bryn 
Mawr to the Boston School of Occupational 
Therapy. 

Married: Louise Swenning to Lancer T. 
Weinrich, USAAF. 

Engaged: Marilyn Tapper to Clifton 
Fletcher Mountain, USNR. 

Winifred Tucker is a student nurse in a 
hospital in Flint, Michigan. Address: Hurley 
Nurses Home. 



22 



THE CLASS OF 1944 

Nancy Baylor University of Nebraska 

B.J. Bertucio Russell Sage (School of Nursing) 

Nan Buland 

Ann Cadmus 

Elinor Cahill 

Jacqueline Calvin 

Patricia Chandler 

Elisabeth Colson 

Patricia Damon 

Nancy Emerson 

Betty Frank 

Ruth Goodall 

Marjorie Hamilton 

Virginia Heidenkamp 

Aagot Hinrichsen 

Janet Hitchcock 

Cynthia Holmes 

Louise Honnen 

Alva Houston 

Molly Hubbard 

Ruth Kirstein 

Frederica Lange 



Smith 

Middlebury 

Barnard 

Smith 

To England 

Pine Manor Junior 

Garland 

Bennett Junior 

University of Kentucky 

Garland 

Vassar 

Sarah Lawrence 

Radcliffe 

To England 

Smith 

Mills 

Studying music in New York 

Lake Erie College 

Colby 

Barnard 



Charlotte Leland 
Ruth Lyons 
Alma Mastrangelo 
Theresa Mastrangelo 
Nancy Mclvor 
Emily McMurray 
Nancy Nicholas 
Ines Ortega 
Carol Paradise 
Katherine Pendleton 
Eva Persson 
Elizabeth Reid 
Shirley Rhodes 
Elizabeth Rich 
Paula Savage 
Marion Stevens 
Priscilla Stevens 
Nancy Stone 
Julia Tavares 
Charlotte Trow 
Harriet Waller 
Martha Watkins 
Shirley Woodams 
Margaret Travis 



Bennett Junior 

Wellesley 

Wellesley 

Pembroke 

Smith 

Barnard 

Cornell 

To South America 

Connecticut 

Mt. Holyoke 

Radcliffe 

Middlebury 

Middlebury 

Skidmore 

To England 

Vassar 

Vassar 

P.G. at Abbot 

Connecticut 

Endicott Junior 

Mt. Holyoke 

Briar cliff Junior 

University of Rochester 

Vassar 



23 




say can you hear — By the dawn's early light 

Our cries of despair Sit down and write clear — 

When Bulletins come back — All news of your self 

Marked by P.O. "not there!" For vour friends far and near 



Name Glass 

Address 

Write news about yourself and others for the February Bulletin. Tear out 
and mail before January 10, to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, An- 
dover, Mass. 

24 



BOB 







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Abbot Academy Bulletin 



February 



1945 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of American Alumni Council 



President 
Mrs. Rolfe M. Kennedy 
(Roberta Kendall) 
Douglaston, N. Y. 

Vice-presidents 
Mrs. Frank C. d'Elseaux 
(Virginia Gay) 
Winchester, Mass. 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
Andover, Mass. 



Mrs. Ernest L. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



OFFICERS, 1 944- 1 946 

Clerk 
Mrs. Edwin H. Goodwin 
(Susan Hildreth) 
Winchester, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. James E. Downs 
(Laura Cheever) 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 
Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 
Miss Marion R. McPherson 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 

I 939~ I 945 . 1942-194^ 

Mrs. A. John Holden Miss Margaret Van Voorhis 

(Polly Bullard) 304 Lexington Ave. 

Middlebury, Vermont New York City, New York 

ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



Boston 
Miss Irene Atwood 
6 Lanark Rd. 
Brookline, Mass. 

Chicago 
Mrs. J. Allen Lind 
(Mary Simpson) 
1239 Asbury Ave. 
Winnetka, Illinois 

Connecticut 
Miss Sara G. Peck 
20 Fairview Terrace 
Derby, Conn. 

Detroit 
Mrs. Thomas A. Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
1 2 1 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Michigan 

Maine, Eastern 
Miss Eleanor Bird 
250 Broadway 
Rockland, Maine 



Maine, Western 
Mrs. Harold Robinson 
(Harriette Wool ver ton) 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

New York 
Miss Charlotte Dane 
21 East 37th St. 
New York City, N. Y. 

Ohio, Central 
Mrs. Paul Meek 
(Louise Norpell) 
Worthington, Ohio 

Ohio, Cleveland 
Mrs. George Worthington 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 

Old Colony 
Mrs. Richard M. Thompson 
(Ruth Niles) 
300 Woodlawn St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Pittsburgh 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
515 No. McKean St. 
Butler, Pa. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Series 12 FEBRUARY 1945 Issue 2 



Table of Contents 

page 
Cover. Girls: Jane Brown '47; Sally Allen '46; Hilary Paterson '45 

Frontispiece: Mary V. Spaulding 

News from Alumnae in Service 3 

Notes from Alumnae in England 4 

I Enjoy My Work as a Glass Fund Secretary .... 5 

Candidates for Nomination for Alumna Trustee ... 6 

Winter and Spring School Calendar 8 

Alumnae Association 10 

Abbot Clubs 11 

In Memoriam 12 

Class News 13 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

JANE B. CARPENTER, 1892, honorary 
CONSTANCE PARKER CHIPMAN, 1906, Editor in Chief 

marion r. Mcpherson, 191 8 

ROBERTA KENDALL KENNEDY, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 




Mary V. Spaulding, Abbot 1940, with some P-38 Pilots 

in Dutch New Guinea 



News from Alumnae in Service 

ABBOT Alumnae are working in Red Gross Canteens in many parts of 
the world, as well as in every state in the Union. A brief glimpse at the 
daily routine of Mary V. Spaulding, '40, now in New Guinea, is typical of the 
experiences of many others. 

Mary lives with eight other girls in a tin shack in a jungle clearing in 
New Guinea, off the beaten path, and quite isolated, with four MP's to 
work the clock around as guards. She leaves early every morning in the cab 
of a huge truck, which takes her over miles of dusty roads to the Red Cross 
Canteen where three GI's who have been assigned to help her, arrive about 
the same time. Together they set about the business of getting a fifteen-gallon 
pot of coffee ready, and arranging sandwiches and cookies on the counter and 
tables, for the hungry horde of men who will rush the canteen as soon as the 
door is opened. The men are combat fliers and ground crews, transport 
crews and their passengers, plus the many men who work on the field. They 
are always hungry, and literally thousands of sandwiches and doughnuts are 
served each day. The men are in the line, not only for the food, but each one 
hoping to have a word with an American girl. 

By the end of the day she is weary. After the return to camp she has 
about two hours leisure before starting out in another truck for another dusty 
ride to a mess hall for dinner. There is fun and recreation in the evening, 
but she must remember one thing; tomorrow at seven the men will be 
lined up at the canteen door! 

# ^r ft tV # 

From "somewhere in Italy," Sgt. Muriel Baker Wood 191 5, writes: "I 
have a job in the Statistical Control Unit, Suicide Combat Unit, the boys 
call it. It deals with bomb tonnages, sorties, effects of bombing etc. Anyone 
in the Air Corps can call on the Unit for information (at ten minutes notice) , 
about anything. While we are rear echelon now, last winter and spring it was 
otherwise, for which we rate an "invasion" star on our European war ribbon. 
Sounds silly, but we have seen what the combat boys go through, and at 
least, have done in our spare time from our jobs, what we can to help them. 
My German, begun at Abbot has come a long way. I have done a little 
interpreting with the French and Dutch troops and hope to do a great deal 
more before long." 



Notes from Alumnae in England 

Kathryn Wallace Brown 1924, writes; "My husband died in August 
1940, at which time I was all tied up in W.V.S. (District organizer), evacuee 
billeting, and civil defense. January 1941, I started my army career. Now I 
am an officer in the A.T.S. (Auxiliary Territorial Service — WACS in the 
States), and am in charge of a platoon of one hundred girls. I am working 
hard, and liking it. I keep in touch with Alice Cole Overton, class of 1927, 
now in Aberdeen." 

Paula Savage 1944, writes from her home in Oxford, "I am waiting to be 
registered, and in the meantime am working in a servicemen's canteen, 
looking after a Brownie pack, and doing other odd jobs. However I am dying 
to really start working because everybody is in uniform or is doing some vital 
war work. 

I was lucky enough to escape the black-out, for we have actually got a 
few lamps in the streets now, which my mother never stops talking about, 
because, whereas she cycled home in the pitch black from the canteen for 
five years, she now has a few lights to guide her. 

The food situation is not nearly as drastic as I expected. We certainly 
are not hungry, although it is extremely monotonous; fish and sausages, 
sausages and fish, and austerity cake that reeks of dried eggs. But of course I 
am not a good judge having come straight from the sumptuous meals at 
Abbot! 

I am sometimes invited to visit young wounded boys in the hospitals; 
although they usually make light of their wounds, yet it is most depressing 
to see young boys so shattered as many of them are. 

I certainly had a marvellous year at Abbot, and wish that I could be 
there now." 

Abbot Alumnae in War Services 

WAVES WACS 

Isabel Arms '32, Lt. (j.g.) Kathryn Bixby '40, T/4 

Ann Clement '40 Anne Cleveland '33, Pvt. 

Dorothy Heidrich '39, H.A. A/c Edith Keller '30, Pvt. 

Catherine McDonnell '26, Sp.Q,3/c Madeleine Proctor '38, Lt. 

Frances Howard O'Brien '25 Christine Robinson '40 

Anne Pearson '43 Ruth Rose » 37 

Patricia Pierpont '42, S2/C Dorothy Walworth '38, Cpl. 

Helen Ripley '30, Ens. Muriel Baker Wood '15, Sgt. 
Eleanor Ritchie '30, Ens. 
Barbara Tucker '32, Ens. 

Grace S. Vibberts '37, Ens. RED CROSS OVERSEAS 

Winifred Wiglesworth '40 Barbara Bellows '39 

vy Ape Charlotte Boynton '37 

Kip Humphrey '36 Charlotte Gowing Cooper ' 1 1 

Louise Hyde '28 

MARINES Annette Robin '33 

Helen Craig '42, Cpl. Mary V. Spaulding '40 

Joan Belden McDonough '41, Pvt. Ella Stonebraker Bennett '27 

(This list includes all who are so far known to the Alumnae Office . Please report additional names) 




I Enjoy 
My Work as 
Class Fund 
Secretary 

By 

Mary Jane Owsley Warwick 

1930 



"Z pray the enclosed will meet your expectations. 
Being immature in the art of expressing myself in 
print, I took the liberty of putting it in letter form. I 
so earnestly desired to have it of the heart, that I had 
to resort to this way of doing it. When I talked to you 
on the phone, it was like striking a match on a burning 
ember. 



You have asked me to do some writing for the Abbot Bulletin. My 
subject is to be about my work as class fund secretary. You particularly 
mentioned that I should write in the same vein in which I occasionally will 
drop you a note. I tried to do this, addressing as it were a large audience, 
granted my sister alumnae, but still an audience! And I became self-conscious, 
stilted and boring. 

Now, when I write to you, it is like taking up a private little heart 
string upon which I can strum a melody and I will not be judged nor con- 
demned if it is not musically correct, but will be forgiven for the enthusiasm 
and the sincerity of my effort. 

If I could but indulge in a brief history even of the high points in my 
life, I would. As it is, let me tell you a little. NOW. I am happy. NOW. My 
life is full to overflowing. I reflect; why? It is because of these high points, 
one of which you have, of course, guessed, is my Abbot years. Again, I re- 
flect; why? Because, there, I learned to expect the fulfillment of my high 
ideals, because I found out that these high ideals were not the exception, but 
the rule. At Abbot I first learned to understand. As I look back, how small a 
ray of light it was! I can liken it to Jesus' parable of the man who sowed a 
seed into the ground then fell asleep. Despite his inattention the seed ma- 
tured, and we are told "the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the 
blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear." Mark 4:28. 

So, when the mid-winter season of the year rolls around and I am asked 
once more to write a note to each member of my class, I allow myself to bask 
in the light of those vivid Abbot days which were such vital steps along 

"the way." 

Nini 



Candidates for the Elective Alumna Member 

of the Board of Trustees 

The nominating committee appointed by the Alumnae Association 
takes pleasure in presenting the following names for nomination for Alumna 
Trustee to serve for six years. Ballots will be mailed by March first, and all 
alumnae are urged to vote and return the ballots to the chairman of the 
nominating committee as promptly as possible. 

Committee: Chairman, Mrs. Lois Hardy Daloz '29, 25 Hillside Rd., 
Wellesley Hills, Mass.; Mrs. Elizabeth Sage Batchelder '33; Miss Dorothy 
Taylor '08. 




Helen S. Allen, Abbot 1932 
Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 

246 Glen Rd., Weston 93, Mass. 



Mrs. Henry graduated from Smith College in 1936. Since then she has 
continued her active interest in Smith and Abbot, serving on the Boards of 
the Smith Alumnae Association, and of the Boston Abbot Club. She acted as 
a Director of the Orchard Home School from 1 938-1 941, and is at present 
president of the Wellesley Smith Club. She married in 1937, and has three 
sons. 




t 



Helen Bradley, A bbot 1919 
Mrs. Harold H. Hodgkinson 

1 6 Griffen Ave., Scarsdale, N. Y. 



Mrs. Hodgkinson graduated from Miss Pierce's School in Boston after 
she finished at Abbot. She married in 1923, and has since devoted herself to 
her home and her family. She has exerted a general interest in young people 
and community affairs. She was president of the New York Abbot Club 
from 1 941 -1 943, and is at present a Director of the New York Club. 



Marion Kimball, Abbot 1921 
Mrs. David H. Bigelow 

326 Highland St., West Newton 65, Mass. 




Mrs. Bigelow was married in 1926, and has been most interested in her 
home, and the bringing up of three daughters. She takes an active part in 
church and community affairs, and has kept in touch with Abbot by serving 
as a vice-president of the Alumnae Association from 1938- 1942 and presi- 
dent of the Boston Abbot Club from 1936- 1937. 



Abbot Winter and Spring Calendar 1945 



January 



February 



March 



April 



May 



Vesper Services, Sundays at 7:30 p.m. 

14 The Rev. A. Graham Baldwin, Phillips Academy 

21 The Rt. Rev. G. Bromley Oxnam, Bishop of the Methodist 

Church in the New York area 
4 The Rev. Roy L. Minich, D.D., The First Church, Maiden 
18 The Rev. Charles R. Brown, D.D., Dean Emeritus, Yale 

Divinity School 
25 The Rev. J. L. McCorison Jr. , The National Conference of 
Christians and Jews, Inc. 
4 The Rev. Herbert Gezork, Andover-Newton Theological 
School 
11 The Rev. Donald Campbell, Dean, Christ Church Cathe- 
dral, Springfield 
18 The Rev. Raymond Calkins D.D., Pastor Emeritus, First 
Church, Cambridge 
8 The Rev. Howard L. Rubendall, Headmaster of Mount 
Hermon School for Boys 

15 The Rev. Arthur H. Bradford, Central Congregational 

Church, Providence, R. I. 

22 The Abbot Christian Association 

29 The Rev. George Cadigan, Grace Church, Salem 

1 3 The Rev. Carl H. Elmore, D.D., First Presbyterian Church, 

Englewood, N. J. 
20 The Rev. Sidney Lovett, D.D., Chaplain Yale University 



January 



February 
March 



March 
S 



*5 

20 



February 3 



10 
11 

17 
3 

10 
17 



School Events and Entertainments 

Talk by Mrs. Paul Robeson 

Concert by Henri Deering, Pianist, and Dorothy Minty, 
Violinist 

Lecture by Mrs. Frank Mansfield Taylor, "Our World 
This Evening" 

Lecture by Li Ling Ai, "Behind the Embroidered Fan" 

Student Recital 

Senior Prom 

Fidelio and Governor Dummer Academy Glee Club con- 
cert and dance at Governor Dummer 

Students Recital 

Senior Play, "Dear Brutus" 



22- April 3 Spring Vacation 



April 



May 



y Russell Curry, Dance and Music 
14 Prep-Junior-Junior-Mid Plays 
21 Fidelio and Phillips Exeter Academy Glee Club concert 

and dance 
28 Cum Laude lecture by Robert Frost 

5 Abbot Birthday Celebration 

6 Organ Recital by Walter Howe 

12 Recital by Mrs. Gray's Speech Pupils 
ig Spring Field Day 

20 Baccalaureate; The Rev. John Edgar Park, D.D., President 

Emeritus of Wheaton College 

21 Commencement Address: The Rev. James T. Cleland, 

D.D., Chaplain, Amherst College 



The John-Esther Art Gallery 
Curator, Maud Morgan 
January and February: Contemporary Abstract and Surrealist Painting 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

As the Bulletin goes to press the school 
has announced the cancellation of the 
spring vacation in response to the urgent 
request of the O.D.T., therefore the dates 
of events in May will have to be changed — 
Commencement will be May 18-21. 



Alumnae Visitors at Abbot 

June 1944 — January 1945 

Harriet Sanford Stuart '19; Margaret Stuart '42; Edith Ninomya '42; 
Miriam Douglas '42; Elizabeth Ward Saunders '25; Rachel Place Smith '33; 
Clara Smith Clark '33; Grace Bowen Collins '38; Betty Hardy '42; Suzanne 
Bates '42; Pam Bolton '42; Elizabeth Bulkeley '21; Sylvia Wright Poole '36; 
Frances Pray '11; Ruth S. Lyons '44; Cornelia McMurray '43; Helen S. 
Barss '43; Dorothy Baxter Reynolds '17; Louise Kimball Jenkins '16; Bunny 
Hamper '43; Betsy Bennett '43; Libby Lovett '42; Harriet Waller '44; Nan 
Buland '44; Bunny Pendleton '44; Louise Risley Floyd '37; Margi Travis '44, 
Julia Tavares '44; Constance Walker '43; Anne Rivinius '40; Marion Kimball 
Bigelow '21; Jane D. Philbin '41; Emily Mills '41; Marjorie Hamilton '44; 
Betty Reid '44; Suzanne Long Kremer '41 ; Joan Hubbard Lawson '39. 



Alumnae Association 



Members of the Boston and New York Abbot Clubs are asked to put 
red circles around the dates of April 7, and April 14. At the meeting of the 
Boston Club on April 7, to be held at the College Club, at 2 p.m., Miss Hear- 
sey will bring the greetings of the school; Mrs. Alice Dixon Bond will speak on, 
"Books in the News." 

The New York Club will hold a luncheon meeting at the New Weston 
Hotel, on April 14. Miss Hearsey will be a welcome speaker, and the club is 
happy to present a distinguished alumna, Miss Margaret Speer 1918, Head- 
mistress of the Shipley School. Miss Speer will speak on "Life in a Con- 
centration Camp in China in 1943." 

The clubs hold few meetings these busy days, so alumnae are earnestly 
asked to make these a great success. If you are not on the mailing list of either 
one, please notify the Alumnae Office, or the presidents, whose names and 
addresses may be found on the inside of the front cover of the Bulletin. 

Commencement 

Commencement will be held from May 1 8-2 1 ; Alumnae Day on May 
19. All alumnae are urged to return for Alumnae Day especially, whether 
or not it is a reunion year. A cordial welcome awaits you! 

New Trustees 

The Board of Trustees is happy to announce the election of two new 
members: Mrs. Wilbur K. Jordan (Frances Ruml), Cambridge; Mr. Stod- 
dard M. Stevens, Jr., Short Hills, New Jersey. 

Alumnae Office 

The Alumnae Office gave its annual Coffee Party to the Senior Class on 
Saturday, January 20. By this means (coffee and doughnuts!), the soon-to- 
be alumnae were made acquainted with the efficient equipment which will 
serve to keep them in close relationship with the school. They inspected the 
stencil and addressograph machines, and realized more fully what detail of 
preparation goes into the mailing of the Alumnae Bulletins. They also 
understood why it was so vitally important to keep the office always informed 
of their correct addresses! An exhibition of old photographs was arranged to 
show them something of the historical background of Abbot. 

American Alumni Council 

Mrs. Chipman attended the meetings of District 1, held at Amherst, from 
January 23-25. From among many papers of practical value, the following 
were especially helpful to the work of the Abbot Alumnae office. "Respon- 
sibility of the Alumni Office to the Classes and the Clubs," by Lois Hardy, 
Bradford Junior College; "Alumni Magazines. Some Problems in Magazine 
Make-up." David T. McCord, editor of the Harvard Alumni Bulletin. President 
Stanley King of Amherst College, was the speaker at the concluding dinner. 

10 



Abbot Clubs 



BOSTON (1892): President Miss Irene 
Atwood, 6 Lanark Rd., Brookline; Vice- 
presidents, Mrs. Gwendolyn Bloomfield Till- 
son, Mrs. Elizabeth Whitaker Warren; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. Ruth Baker Johnson; 
Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Marion Ireland 
Conant; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Nay Gram- 
kow; Auditor, Mrs. Helen Allen Henry; Pro- 
gram Chairman, Mrs. Ruth Tyler Smith; 
Directors (1943- 1945), Mrs. Elizabeth Sage 
Batchelder, Mrs. Faith Chipman Parker, 
Mrs. Alice Schultz Valkenburgh; Directors 
(1944- 1 946), Mrs. Katherine Allen Babson, 
Mrs. Martha E. Ransom Tucker, Priscilla 
Richards. 

The Club held a most successful meeting 
on November 18, at the College Club. Miss 
Lillian R. Fletcher, Supervisor of Steward- 
esses, Northeast Airlines, gave a delightful 
talk on, "The Drama behind the Scenes in 
Air Transportation." 

The Alumnae Association and the Boston 
Club will hold their combined spring meet- 
ing on Saturday, April 7, at the College 
Club, at 2 p.m. Speakers: Mrs. Alice Dixon 
Bond; Miss Marguerite Hearsey. 

CHICAGO (192 1): President, Mrs. J. 
Allen Lind (Mary Simpson); Secretary, Mrs. 
Edith Bullen Creeden, 461 Hill Rd., Win- 
netka; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Hall 
Walker. 

CONNECTICUT (1923): President, Miss 
Sara Peck, 20 Fairview Ter., Derby; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Lawton Cheney, 
36 Morse St., Hamden. 

DETROIT (1922): President, Mrs. Thom- 
as Nalle (Harriet Balfe) ,1211 Willow Lane, 
Birmingham. 

MAINE, EASTERN (1926): President, 
Miss Eleanor Bird, 250 Broadway, Rockland; 
Vice-President, Mrs. Frances McDougall 
McLoon; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. An- 
netta Richards Bryant, Round Pond. 



MAINE, WESTERN (1922): President, 
Mrs. Harold Robinson (Harriette Woolver- 
ton), Cape Elizabeth; Treasurer, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Baldwin Frohock. 

NEW YORK (1898): President, Miss Char- 
lotte Dane 1936, 21 East 38th St., New 
York City; Vice-Presidents, Mrs. Eunice 
Meigs Pease 1921, Miss Gertrude Holbrook 
1925; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Ruth Cann 
Baker 1931; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Despina 
Plakias Messinesi 1929; Treasurer, Miss 
Charlotte Boynton; Directors, Mrs. Helga 
Lundin Buttrick 1923, Mrs. Laura Scudder 
Williamson 1924, Mrs. Helen Bradley 
Hodgkinson 191 9. 

The fall meeting of the Club was cancelled. 

Alumnae are asked to make a special 
effort to attend the annual meeting, to be 
held on Saturday, April 14, at the New 
Weston Hotel. "War Time Special" Lunch. 
Speakers: Miss Marguerite Hearsey; Miss 
Margaret Speer, Abbot 19 18, Headmistress 
of the Shipley School. Miss Speer will speak 
on "Life in a Concentration Camp in China 
in 1943." 

OHIO, CENTRAL (192 1): President, 
Secretary, Mrs. Paul Meek (Louise Norpell), 
5600 Meek Rd., Worthington. 

OHIO, CLEVELAND (1927): President, 
Mrs. George Worthington (Madeleine Fiske), 
Chesterland, Ohio. 

OLD COLONY (1924): President, Mrs. 
Richard M. Thompson (Ruth Niles), 300 
Woodlawn St., Fall River; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Mrs. Louise Thompson Cortrell, 
372 Madison St., Fall River. 

PITTSBURGH (192 1): President, Mrs. 
George H.Jackson (Gertrude Miller), Butler, 
Pa.; Secretary, Mrs. Joseph M. Browne (Eliza 
Atwell), 529 Pine Rd., Sewickley. 



1 1 



In Memoriam 



1864 

Ada F. Daniels died on April 13, 1944. 

1876 

Kate Dresser, widow of Oliver D. Thomp- 
son, died in Pittsburgh, Pa., on November 4, 
1944. 

1877 

Sarah Bird, wife of the late Judge Charles 
N. Harris, died on December 7, 1944, in 
Winchester. 

Mrs. Harris's sons, Arthur and Henry, 
have sent the following expression of ap- 
preciation of Abbot's influence on the life of 
their mother, from which we quote. "Ex- 
cept for her family, home and church, prob- 
ably no single factor contributed as much 
to her happy and useful life as her years at 
Abbot .... From many intimate friends, 
Carrie Hall '77, married Mother's brother; 
another, Helen Bowers Lovering, became 
her next door neighbor for over forty years. 
But greater than the personal friendship and 
influence of these Abbot alumnae on the 
lives of one another, was the larger influence 
that they had on thousands of others with 
whom they came in contact. Surely the 
spirit and influence of Abbot Academy 
which helped to mould their characters 
must have spread and inspired people in all 
walks of life . . . . " 

1885 

S. Frances Marrett died July 8, 1944. 
Miss Marrett taught for twenty-five years 
at the Perkins Institute for the Blind. Helen 
Keller was her most distinguished pupil, 
whom she brought to Abbot in 1891. 



1887 

Lillian Rhoads died on December 16, 
1944, m Newark, Ohio. For many years she 
was a teacher in the school for the Deaf 
and Dumb in Columbus, Ohio. 

1893 

Maude T. Belknap died on December 29, 
1944, in Andover. 

1903 

Bertha May Harvey died on November 
5, 1944, in Hallowell, Maine. 



1908 

Jane Bodell died on July 7, 1944, 
Providence, R. I. 



in 



1916 

Agnes Grant died on November 17, 1944, 
in New York City, following a long illness. 
After she retired from a successful stage 
career, Agnes became interested in Red 
Cross Work, travelling, giving lectures, and 
radio broadcasts. She also had an active 
interest in the housing problems in New 
York, and worked in the U.S.O. organiza- 
tion. 

1917 

Katherine T. Wiest died on November 
22, 1944, in York, Pa. She was the sister of 
Henrietta Wiest Zaner, 191 1. 

1932 

Leonore Hezlitt, wife of William E. Dur- 
ham, died on December 31,1 944, in Kansas 
City, Mo. 



12 



Class News 

The Editors regret the necessity of reporting the ever increasing 
news of sorrow and loss which the war is bringing to so many alumnae. 
May the heartfelt sympathy which flows from the Abbot circle of friends 
bring some small measure of comfort to each one. 



1879 

Adelaide Weeks writes that her place at 
West Tisbury, Martha's Vineyard, took the 
full force of the September hurricane, and 
that her loss was heavy. 

1881 

Emma Chadbourne Wood has sent a photo- 
graph, taken in 1878, of a group of girls 
taken on the porch of Abbot Hall, which 
then stood facing School St., in about the 
middle of the present "Circle." Mrs. Wood's 
husband died two years ago, after many 
years of pastoral service with her in West 
Medway and other towns. She is now living 
in Holliston. 

1860-1891 

Class Funds Secretary: Mrs. Ernest C. 
Young (Ruth Childs), 6 Emerson St., 
Brookline. 

1886 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frank W. 
Darling (Mary Gorton), Hampton, Vir- 
ginia. 

1887 

Lillian Cutter Porter acted at once when 
she found no news of '87 in the Bulletin, 
by sending word she was well, and "actively 
interested in everything going on today." 

1890 

Fanny Gordon Bartlett's son, Lt. Com. 
Samuel C. Bartlett Jr., was recently awarded 
the "Legion of Merit" for serving over two 
years in the Navy "with marked distinction." 
Her daughter, Dr. Agnes, Holyoke '34, is 
doing a comprehensive job in the General 
Hospital at Poston, Arizona, relocation 
center for Japanese. Her ability to speak the 
language, known from her childhood in 
Kyoto, is of great advantage to her, especial- 
ly in dealing with the older women, who 
know little English. 

1891 

Dr. Daniel B. Hardenbergh Jr., son of 
Annie Bull Hardenbergh, is with the Yale 
Medical Unit in New Zealand. Her grand- 



son, Mark, son of her oldest son, has entered 
Phillips Academy. 

1892 
Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane B. 
Carpenter, School St., Andover. 

1894 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Doremus 
Scudder (Mabel Bosher), 133 West Ninth 
St., Claremont, California. 

1895 
Fiftieth Reunion 

1896 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Henry V. 
Conant (Ruth Loring), 914 High St., 
Dedham. 

Grace Pearson Preston's son, Com. Alex- 
ander Preston, is expected home from the 
S.W. Pacific for a furlough this winter. 

May Young Duffy is giving her time at the 
Red Cross keeping the records of the differ- 
ent departments while her son George is in 
India with the Engineers. She and her hus- 
band expect to go to "The Breakers" at 
Palm Beach, for six weeks. 

1897 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Alexander 
Bunce (Gertrude Ware), R.F.D. 1, Rock- 
ville, Conn. 

Harold Rowland, husband of Emily 
Willett, died on October 24, 1944, in Need- 
ham. 

1898 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert W. 
Dunbar (Selina Cook), 3 Elk St., Apt. 7, 
Albany, New York. 

Annie Smart Angus' mother, Mrs. Martha 
Stewart Smart, died on November 27, 1944, 
in her ninety-sixth year. 

1899 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Brainerd E. 
Smith (Lilian Mooers), 116 East St., Me- 
thuen. 

Ruth Child Young's son is in the Infantry 
somewhere in Northern Italy. 



J 3 



1900 

Forty-Fifth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Miss Mary Bancroft, 
98 1/2 Main St., Andover. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur P. 
Spear (Grace Chapman), 156 Winchester 
St., Brookline. 

Helen Abbott has retired after twenty- 
five years of service, from the position of 
Assistant to the Dean in Charge of Residence 
Halls at Barnard College. She now makes 
her home with her brother in White Plains, 
New York. 

1901 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Helen Hale, 
86 Knox St., Lawrence. 

1902 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Hezekiah 
Poore (Mildred Mooers), 37 Ames St., 
Lawrence. 

Miriam Carpenter has a position at the 
Harvard Law School, reorganizing and 
indexing records, and is in Andover for the 
weekends with her sister, Jane Carpenter. 
One of her hobbies is persuading people to 
adopt hobbies, because of the fun she has 
had of late dabbling in paints. 

Harriett Chase Newell has two sons in the 
service; Edward is a Corporal in Signal 
Photo Co., with the Seventh Army; Prescott 
is S/Sgt., an airplane mechanic in the Pa- 
cific area. She has nine grandchildren, in- 
cluding two adopted, one step, and six real! 

1903 

Bessie Bampton Clark's son, Capt. Bruce B. 
Clark, is in charge of a Base Weather Station 
in Texas. 

1905 

Fortieth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. W. S. Knicker- 
bocker (Frances Cutler), Loomis School, 
Windsor, Conn. 

Elsie Jeffers Hobbs writes that her husband 
has retired from teaching, and they have 
moved back to his boyhood home in Kittery, 
Maine. 

1907 

Marjory Bond Crowley's son, Cpl. John R. 
Crowley, is with the 14th Air Force based in 
western China. He was stationed in India 
and flew over "the Hump" into China. He 
was married in 1941 to Shirley Cole of 
Melrose, and has a son twenty-one months 
old. 



Anna Richards Folsom has written of the 
arrival of her second grandchild, on Decem- 
ber 15, 1944, born to her oldest daughter, 
Carolyn Folsom Stoddard. The baby is 
named for her great-grandmother, Char- 
lotte Blodget Richards, Abbot 1878, and is 
her fourth great grandchild. Anna's second 
daughter, Charlotte Saunders is an en- 
gineer's aid at the Gruman Airplane factory, 
Bethpage, L. I. She is very proud to have 
designed a minute part on Gruman's newest 
navy "cat." Her husband, Capt. Robert 
Saunders is an Army doctor, at present on a 
hospital ship ferrying between France and 
England. 

1908 

Ruth Van Vliet Fawcett reports a new 
granddaughter, Ruth Barlow Fawcett, born 
May 20, 1944, to her son, Dr. John C. 
Fawcett. Dr. Fawcett has a Residency at the 
Bethesda Suburban Hospital until June. 
Ruth's other son and family are living with 
her for the duration. 

1909 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Gilbert L. 
Canterbury (Beulah McCarthy) 18th St., 
N.W., Canton 3, Ohio. 

Mary Sweeney of the Romance Languages 
Department at Wheaton College, was sent 
to Spain during the summer of 1944 by the 
U. S. Government to help arrange for 
cultural relationship between the U.S. and 
Spain. 

1910 
Thirty-Fifth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Owen Morgan 
(Emily Silsby), 55 High St., West Hartford, 
Conn. 

Class Fund Chairman: Mrs. Myron G. 
Darby (Ethel Reigeluth), no Tangle wylde 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Marian Sanford reports her interesting 
work on the Woman's Home Companion; "I 
haven't been Travel Editor for almost three 
years, but am in charge of a group of 2000 
women called Reader-Reporters, who write 
to us from every part of the United States 
about their families, communities and 
problems. It is fascinating work, as I love 
to work with people." Marian also edits the 
Reader Reporter News, which reflects the 
views of women from all over the country on 
the many issues they face these critical 
times. 



H 



1911 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Douglas 
Donald (Edith Johnson) 8 Carisbrooke 
St.. Andover. 

1913 

Ethel Rand is teaching six different sub- 
jects in the high school on Deer Island, 
Maine; and is doing church work on 
another island. 

1914 

Helen Gilbert Rich had her five children 
all together at Christmas; her oldest son, 
William, having returned from more than 
two years in Field Ambulance Service in 
Africa and Italy. 

Elsie Whipple RevilPs daughter, Eloise 
Spruance, was married on June 3, 1944, to 
Lt. Paul L. Seramur USAF., recently re- 
turned from service as Navigator on a B24 
Liberator Bomber in the South Pacific. 

Margaret Wylie Ware and her mother 
have been living for a year in Chicago to be 
near her son Jack, while he was training in 
the Army Air Force. She studied radio sing- 
ing and "commercials" for a hobby. Now 
that Jack is in the Pacific, she is returning to 
her home in California. 

1915 

Thirtieth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Miss Marion Brooks, 
134 Charles St., Boston. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Eugene 
Bernardin (Mary Flynn), n Abbot St., 
Andover. 

Eleanor Bartlett Atwater's husband, David 
H. Atwater, died suddenly on September 25, 
1944. 

Dorothy Gilbert Bellows' son James has 
received his commission as Ensign in the 
Air Force. Barbara '39, is "somewhere in 
Great Britain," with the Red Cross. 

Mattie Larrabee Whittemore reports on 
her family. "Gertrude (191 5 Class baby, and 
daughter-in-law of Emily Willett Rowlands 
'97), lives in Wellesley with her three-year- 
old son, Hugh, while her husband is on 
active duty on the Pacific. Carol Whittemore 
Fellows, 1938, has a new son, Russell, born 
November 22, '44. Her first baby, Susan, is 
now three. They live in Springfield, Vt. My 
older son, Ted Jr., is in the Navy V-12 unit 
at Bates College, and my younger son Bill 
is a sophomore at Noble and Greenough 
School. (Of course I wouldn't be bragging, 



but has any other member of Class '15 three 
grandchil dr en? ! ) " 

1916 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. James E. 
Downs (Laura Cheever), Andover. 

1918 

Mariette Goodrich Page has three sons: 
Walter a Lt. in the Naval Reserve, William 
a cadet in the Coast Guard, and Hazen, a 
senior at Phillips Academy. 

Katharine Tougas Lombard's daughter 
Joan is attending the Bouve-Boston School 
of Physical Education. 

Married : Virginia Vincent to Burt Greene 
Phillips, October 27, 1944. 

Dorothea Clark Farnham's son John was 
killed in an aviation accident in this country. 

Helen Cutting writes that she "enjoyed 
summer session at Duke School of Spanish 
Studies at Durham, N. C, and hopes to be 
there next summer also. Woman's College, 
University of North Carolina, where I 
teach, is a fine place. Come and see us!" 

Mary Davis Irwin has a grandson, James 
Everett Collins Jr., born to her daughter 
Mary-Louise, October 27, 1944. 

1919 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Grace L. 
Boynton (Grace Leyser) 30 Engle St., 
Tenafly, New Jersey. 

1920 
Twenty-Fifth Renuion 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. William W. 
Kurth (Isabel Sutherland), 300 North 
Main St., Andover. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Beverly R. 
Hubbard (Muriel Moxley), 172 Putnam 
Ave., Hamden 14, Conn. 

Helen Walker Parsons' husband, Talcott 
Parsons, Sociologist, was one of the group 
of Harvard professors which won the first 
prize of $5000. in the much talked of 
Boston contest, with "a practical program 
to promote sound growth and prosperity in 
the Metropolitan area." 

1921 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. David H. 
Bigelow (Marion Kimball), 326 Highland 
St., West Newton. 

Martha Smith Cotter is bringing up a 
family of four while her husband, Com- 
mander in the Maritime Services, is some- 



J 5 



where in England. She has hopes of her 
oldest daughter entering Abbot in the near 
future. 

1922 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. Evans 
Kephart (Ruth Hill), 23 Lyme Rd., Han- 
over, N. H. 

Beatrice Goff is working in Bloomington, 
111., as General Secretary of the Y.W.C.A. 

Katherine Damon Kletzien is living in 
West Hartford, Conn., while her husband 
is in France. She has four children, Edith 13, 
Phyllis 1 1 , Damon 7 years old and Ralph 
22 months old. She finds herself very busy, 
both physically and mentally. The questions 
fly thick and fast and in spite of Abbot, she 
finds Compton's Encyclopedia a constant 
and necessary help. Her oldest daughter is 
studying Latin this year and Katherine 
writes gratefully to Miss Robinson saying, 
"I remember I liked Latin, always felt I un- 
derstood the 'ground work,' thanks to you." 
Also sent her love to Miss Mason and said 
she remembers how much help she was to 
her in keeping her class treasurer's book 
balanced. 

Elizabeth Whittemore has recently taken 
the position of executive secretary for the 
Girl Scouts of Oahu. She is well qualified, as 
she has had a varied experience in a number 
of cities in the U.S. We are indebted to 
Katherine Farlow Hutchinson's ('27) husband 
for this information, as he sent the clipping 
from the Honolulu Advertized. 

1923 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Sterling Dow 
(Elizabeth Flagg), 36 Holden St., Cam- 
bridge. 

1924 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. John 
Holden (Polly Bullard), Middlebury, Ver- 
mont. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Burke 
(Lila Clevenger), a second child, a son 
Thomas Clevenger, August 18, 1944. 

1925 

Twentieth Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George B. 
Beveridge (Charlotte Hanna), Sanfordtown 
Rd., Redding, Conn. 

Lt. Com. Leland Burr Jr., husband of 
Elizabeth Lincoln, died in January of 
wounds received in action in the southern 
Pacific. 



1926 

Catherine McDonnell Sp. Q.3/c, is sta- 
tioned at WAVE Quarters D in Washing- 
ton. She says, "I have enjoyed the Navy 
and my work immensely." 

1927 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Carter 
(Pauline Humeston), a third child, and 
second son, Thomas Benedict, July 15, 1944. 

Harriet Nash is Employment Interviewer 
for the U.S. Employment Service of the 
War Manpower Commission, in Rochester, 
New York. 

1928 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Emily Sloper, 
36 Russell St., New Britain, Conn. 

Katherine Fox Smiley reports her busy 
life on her farm at Sterling Junction. "You 
wouldn't believe an Abbot girl could do all 
the things I've tried my hand at lately. I'll 
never want to drive four horses again after 
driving the big sprayer (holds four hundred 
gallons and weighs a cool three tons) ... to 
pinch hit when we had no hired man. We 
had several groups of British sailors for 
apple pickers. What tales they gave you 
hints of without talking very much, and 
how they enjoyed the green wilderness of 
fruit trees, and how they devoured the fresh 
bread and plum loaf I made for them. They 
wouldn't eat corn on the cob. believe it or 
not." With all this farm responsibility she 
has had time to keep up her writing." 

Helen Leavitt Fisher and husband lead 
busy lives. He is minister of a church in 
Sheffield, 111., and Helen has her own 
church in Providence, 111., twelve miles 
distant. They put on a community per- 
formance of "The Messiah," with notable 
success. Their son, Wilkin, is twenty-eight 
months old. 

Theodora Talcott Slater reports a daugh- 
ter, Shirley, born in 1940. She has also a 
son John, born in 1935. 

Eleanor Thompson Snedeker is with her 
husband, recently returned from the Pacific, 
now stationed at Parris Island, S. C. 

1929 

E. Payson Upham, father of Carol Upham 
Fox, died on December 18, 1944, in W 7 aban. 

1930 
Fifteenth Reunion 

Class Fund Chairman: Mrs. Jack R. 



16 



Warwick (Mary Jane Owsley), 26 Ledge- 
wood Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Dean Ballou's husband is on 
leave from the faculty of Smith College, 
serving as Fighter Director on board one of 
the large new carriers. She lives in North- 
ampton with her two children, Bob, seven, 
and Susan, four vears old. 

Alice Hoyt Wood reports a growing family. 
Nancy, seven, Jim Jr., four, Elizabeth, two, 
and William Hoyt, eight months. She says, 
"Still have that Boston accent even after 
nine years living in the middle west, but 
Nancy certainly is trying to correct me!" 

Kathryn Ingram Rowe is living in New 
Haven, where her husband is associate pro- 
fessor connected with the Institute for Inter- 
national Studies at Yale. She has two boys, 
Andrew Stewart, five, and Robert Ingram, 
two and a half years old. 

Ensign Eleanor Ritchie has been in the 
Navy for a year, stationed in Washington. 

Married: Doris Lydia Sturtevant to 
Robert Edwin Bacon, USMC, November, 

1944- 

1931 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Francis Hol- 
land (Barbara Graham), 218 West Marion 
St., South Bend, Indiana. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Philip G. Bell 
(Gertrud Van Peursem) a son, Philip Gra- 
ham, August 2 1 , 1944. Mr. Bell is in the Mer- 
chant Marine as Chief instructor of Engi- 
neers at the Maritime Service Upgrading 
School in New York City. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John W. Harwick 
(Linda Rollins), their fifth child and second 
son, Peter Rollins, on November 16, 1944. 

Dorothy Stevenson Russell writes from 
Houston, Texas, that she has a second 
daughter, Janet Goodson, born last July. 
Kathryn was three in January. 

1932 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Dorothy 
Richardson, Boston Rd., Billerica. 

Ruth Mailey is a teller in the Bay State 
Merchants Bank in Lawrence. 

Dorothy Rockwell has received a notable 
honor in being elected president of the 
Newspaper Guild of Washington; the first 
woman to be elected to that office. She con- 
tinues as one of the Washington correspond- 
ents of the Philadelphia Inquirer. 

Barbara Tucker is an Ensign with the 
WAVES. 



1934 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Tyge E. Rothe 
(Delight Hall), their second child, a daugh- 
ter, Lillian Alden, January 2. 

1935 

Tenth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Harry L. Mac- 
Cready Jr. (Barbara Chamberlain), 421 
W. DeSoto St., Pensacola, Florida. 

Born: To 2nd Lt. and Mrs. Herbert H. 
Garrison (Elizabeth Murphy) twin sons, 
Mark Chapin and Ray Hermon, June 13, 

io 44- 
Born: To Dr. and Mrs. Alan W. Fraser 

(Katharine Scudder) a second daughter, 

Joy, October 17, 1944. 

1936 

Priscilla Mailey is teaching at the Marble- 
head High School. 

Grace Nichols Knight is staff nurse with 
the Visiting Nurse Association in New 
Haven, Conn. She writes that she "is among 
the few fortunate ones who is able to have a 
home with my husband, who is doing gradu- 
ate study at Yale." 

Elinor Robinson is a cadet nurse at the 
Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. John L. Simonds 
(Mary Trafton) a daughter, Virginia Traf- 
ton, October 10, 1944. 

1937 

Charlotte Boynton and Barbara Bellows 
'39, went across to England on the same 
ship, and are still working together with the 
Red Cross. 

Louise Risley Floyd is taking the Social 
Service course at Simmons College. 

Ruth Rose is training at the Third WAC 
Training Center at Fort Ogelthorpe, Ga. 

Born: To Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. Warren S. 
Wilkinson (Joan Todd), their second child, 
a son, Todd Scripps, June 26, 1944. Lt. 
Wilkinson is with the Seabees in the Pacific 



area. 



1938 



Mary Ailing is doing post-graduate work 
at the University of Michigan. 

Phyllis England Letts is working as secre- 
tary and receptionist at the Westover School 
in Conn., and her husband is principal of 
the Shepardson School in Middlebury. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Biedenham 
(Dorothy Hudson), their second child, a 



17 



daughter Dorothy, July 3, 1944. Doll's hus- 
band is Flight Instructor in the Navy at 
Bunker Hill, Indiana, and they live in Koko- 
mo, Indiana. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. John White 
(Anne Simpson) twin daughters, Susan and 
Leslie, February 14, 1944. 

Born: To Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. Peter Prud- 
den (Constance Thurber) a daughter, 
Joanna, October 19, 1944. 

Born : To Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Fellows 
(Carol Whittemore) their second child, a 
son, Russell Miller Fellows II, November 
22, 1944. 

1939 

Sarah Bradley Deuell is at home with her 
mother in Hornell, N. Y. She hopes to join 
her husband, an aviation cadet in the Army 
Air Force, at Maxwell Field, Ala., later in 
the spring. 

Lucia Buchanan is working at the Mass. 
General Hospital in Boston. 

1940 

Fifth Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Carl H. 
Bolter (Jane Wilson), Apt. 12, 361 Harvard 
St., Cambridge. 

Kathryn Bixby is a Technician 4th grade 
in the WACS. She is assigned to the General 
Staff in the Pentagon, Washington, and re- 
ports that she finds her work very interesting. 

Born: To Lt. Com. and Mrs. Daniel 
Hogan Jr. (Gisela Bolten), a daughter, 
Gisela Barrie, January 7. 

Engaged: Suzanne Chadwick to Erie 
William Gilbert. 

Engaged: Frances Chandler to Cadet C. 
W. Partridge Jr., West Point. Frances is 
working at the Baptist School of Dancing in 
Boston, with both teaching and secretarial 
duties. 

Ann Clement has joined the WAVES. 

Jeanne Cowles Wilson is living in Boston 
while her husband is serving his nine months 
interneship at the Mass. General Hospital. 

Carolyn Cross is continuing her studies at 
M.I.T., and doing research for the Quarter- 
master Corps on the side. 

Mary Howard is travelling around the 
country in the interests of the World Student 
Service Fund. 

Engaged: Marietta Meyer to William A. 
Ekberg. She expects to be married in June 
when he graduates from West Point. 

Susan Place answers our cry for news! 



"My life has followed the pattern I had 
planned at Abbot. Sept. 1940 found me at 
Syracuse University, loving every minute of 
it. Not until this year did I discover that 
"Tish" Downey had joined the same sorori- 
ty, Gamma Phi Beta, at Stamford, as I did 
at Syracuse. After four full and glorious 
years I graduated last May. In June I 
started working for G.E., in the Aircraft 
Instructional Section of the Publicity Dept. 
It is just the position I wanted and Schenec- 
tady is a friendly city, so I am enjoying my 
life immensely." 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Guy deBrun 
(Jaqueline Proctor) a daughter Jeannie, 
October 24, 1944. 

Anne Rivinius is representative and 
junior salesman for International Business 
Machines, in eastern New England. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Franklin R. Hoar 
(Doris Sawyer) a daughter, Stephanie 
Bradford, December 20, 1944. 

Married: Bonney Wilson to Cpl. Richard 
A. Hakanson USAAF, December 2, 1944. 
At present he is stationed at Barksdale Field, 
Shreveport, La. 

Nancy Wilscn Ainslie graduated last June 
from Wheelock College, and is now teaching 
at the Dedham Country Day School. 

Married: Susan Woodman to Ens. Robert 
T. McSherry, January 15, at Concord, N. H. 
She will live in San Diego, Cal. 

Engaged: Joan Wyatt to Lt. Donald 
Bramley, USAAF. 

1941 

Married: Pvt. Joan Belden to Platoon 
Sgt. A. H. McDonough USMC, December 
5, 1944. Address: WR Bn. Bks. 338, Marine 
Corps Base, San Diego, 40, Cal. 

Lt. Lawrence Scofield, husband of Jean- 
nette Biart, was killed in a plane crash at 
Tampa, Florida, on November 18, 1944, 
just before he was to go overseas. 

Jane Davey sends greetings from Lake 
Placid, N. Y., where she has, "a position 
at the North Country School. My duties are 
numerous, interesting and never dull. Am in 
charge of the horses, teach riding, counselor 
duties, and assist with the fourth and fifth 
grades. Best wishes to all." 

Margaret Little Dice has graduated from 
the University of Michigan, and is now with 
her husband in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 

Sue Long Kremer's husband died in 
action on December 30, 1944, in Luxem- 






18 



bourg. Following his release from a German 
prison camp, he was severely wounded, at 
which time he received the "Purple Heart." 
After recovery he returned to the front 
where he received fatal wounds. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Roger W. Black- 
more (Polly Packard), a son, Paul Packard, 
November 3, 1944. Polly is living with her 
mother in Ashland, N. H., while her hus- 
band flies a Liberator bomber over the 
Pacific. 

Married: Eloise Perkins to Cpl. Robert M. 
Blizzard, March 6, 1944. While her husband 
is in France with the Medical Corps, Eloise 
plans to work in Schenectady, N. Y. She 
graduated from Mt. Holyoke in August. 

Born: To Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. Stanley M. 
Vermeil (Louella Sommer) a son, Peter 
Sommer, October 29, 1944. 

Engaged: Adeline Waterhouse to Philip 
Mackay III. Her wedding is planned for 
February 24. 

Born: To Capt. and Mrs. Edgar J. Wicker 
(Dorothy White) a son, Edgar John Jr., 
November 8, 1944. 

1942 

Engaged: Mary Lou Gilbert to Cpl. 
Burnett Graham Bartley Jr. 

Shirley Ann Harrison (aff. '42), graduated 
from Kendall Hall School, and is now at- 
tending Vesper George School of Art, in 
Boston. 

Engaged: Barbara Robjent to Lt. Herbert 
Pickford Moore, U.S.A. 

During last summer Margaret Sime 
wrote from Scotland to a friend, "At the 
moment I am in the throes of work. Chem- 
istry and physics which I am having extra 
tutoring for and am sitting in September. 
The intention of the powers that be at the 



moment seem to be to make a chemist of 
me. For the rest of the time I read and mend 
clothes. It seems I have an unending stream 
of stockings to mend, they stand so little, 
and are so precious." 

Engaged: Thirsa Sands to Lt. (j.g.) Rob- 
erts S. Fuiks USNR. Thirsa has transferred 
to Smith College, where she is rooming 
with Betsey Fowler. 

Married: Elsie Williams to Lt. Ery Whi- 
taker Kehaya, AAC, October 7, 1944, in 
New York City. 

1943 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Marion 
Burdine, Hollins College, Va. 

Engaged: Marion Burdine to John Han- 
cock Notman. 

Jean Craig has transferred from Wellesley 
College to the University of Michigan. 

Catherine Feeney has transferred to 
Cornell University. 

Honora Haynes is working in a machine 
shop as a machinist, and living at home in 
Weston. Her brother was killed in action 
in France last fall. 

Margaret Jacobus plans to enter the 
University of California in March. As her 
father died last May, her mother will go 
there with her. 

Engaged: Mary Ann Moss to Flight Officer 
Ralph C. Chaplin AAC. While he is over- 
seas Mary Ann is secretary for the Carter 
Oil Co., in Billings, Montana. 

Anne Pearson has joined the WAVES 
hoping to be assigned to the hospital corps. 

1944 
First Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Nancy Mc- 
Ivor, Cushing House, Smith College, North- 
ampton. 



19 




HEN you have moved — it's too late; 
Your Bulletin comes back — Just fate! 

If you write us before 

'Twill be at your door 
With our news, and your news, up-to-date! 



Name Class 

Address 

Write news about yourself and others for the May Bulletin. Tear out 
and mail before April i , to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Andover, 
Mass. 



20 



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Abbot Academy Bulletin 



May 



1945 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of American Alumni Council 



President 
Mrs. Rolfe M. Kennedy 
(Roberta Kendall) 
Douglaston, N. Y. 

Vice-presidents 
Mrs. Frank G. d'Elseaux 
(Virginia Gay) 
Winchester, Mass. 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
Andover, Mass. 



Mrs. Ernest L. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



OFFICERS, 1 944- 1 946 

Clerk 
Mrs. Edwin H. Goodwin 
(Susan Hildreth) 
Winchester, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. James E. Downs 
(Laura Cheever) 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 
Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 
Miss Marion R. McPherson 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 

i939- J 945 . 1942-194^ 

Mrs. A. John Holden Miss Margaret Van Voorhis 

(Polly Bullard) 304 Lexington Ave. 

Middlebury, Vermont New York City, New York 

ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



Boston 
Mrs. Ernest L. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Chicago 
Mrs. J. Allen Lind 
(Mary Simpson) 
1239 Asbury Ave. 
Winnetka, Illinois 

Connecticut 
Miss Sara G. Peck 
20 Fairview Terrace 
Derby, Conn. 

Detroit 
Mrs. Thomas A. Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
1 2 1 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Michigan 

Maine, Eastern 
Miss Eleanor Bird 
250 Broadway 
Rockland, Maine 



Maine, Western 
Mrs. Harold Robinson 
(Harriette Wool ver ton) 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

New York 
Miss Gertrude Holbrook 
Larchmont, N. Y. 

Ohio, Central 
Mrs. Paul Meek 
(Louise Norpell) 
Worthington, Ohio 

Ohio, Cleveland 
Mrs. George Worthington 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 



Old Colony 
Mrs. Richard M. Thompson 
(Ruth Niles) 
300 Woodlawn St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Pittsburgh 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
515 No. McKean St. 
Butler, Pa. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Series 12 MAY 1945 Issue 3 



Table of Contents 



Frontispiece: Abbot Leaders in Education 
The Spirit of Abbot in Education 

What to Read? 

An Invitation 

Commencement Program 

Reunion Chairmen 

Alumnae Day 

Abbot Clubs 

Felicitations 

In Memoriam 

Class News 



C. P. C. 



Alice C. Sweeney igi4 
Marguerite Hearsey 



page 

3 

4 

5 
6 



7 
8 

9 

9 
10 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

JANE B. CARPENTER, 1892, honorary 

CONSTANCE PARKER CHIPMAN, 1906, Editor in Chief 

MARION R. McPHERSON, 1918 

ROBERTA KENDALL KENNEDY, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 






MARGARET BAILEY SPEER 

Abbot 1918, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege 1922. Dean of Yenching 
University, Peiping, China, 
1 933- 1 942. Since 1944 head- 
mistress of the Shipley School, 
Bryn Mawr. 




Abbot Leaders 

in 

Education 






ADELAIDE V. V. BLACK 

Abbot 1926. Graduate of Kath- 
arine Gibbs School. Appointed 
Alumnae Secretary of all the 
Katharine Gibbs Schools in 
1 93 1, then Registrar of the 
New York School in 1933. In 
1944 she was made Dean of the 
New York School. 




MIRA BIGELOW WILSON 

Abbot 1 910, Smith College 
1 9 14. Boston University School 
of Theology 1918. Instructor 
of Bible at Smith 1 921 -1923. 
From 1 923- 1 929 Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Biblical Literature at 
Smith, and Class Dean. In 
1928 she was appointed prin- 
cipal of the Northfield School 
for Girls. She was Alumna 
Trustee from 1 931 -1936, and 
then was elected as a perman- 
ent member of the Abbot 
Board of Trustees. 




ALICE CURTISS SWEE1 

Abbot 1 914, Vassar Col 
1 918. Teacher of English 
Abbot 1920-1923. Since 3 
Director of Studies at Abbe 




MARIATTA TOWEF 

Abbot 1933, Wellesley Coj 

1937. Teacher of mathem' 
at Northfield School for < 

1938. Received her M.A. i. 
the University of Wiscoj 
1943. In 1945 appointee 
assistant principal and din 
of extracurricular activiti< 
Northfield. 



The Spirit of Abbot in Education 

ABBOT was founded on the rock of integrity, high principles and stand- 
ards, governed by religious feeling and inspiration. With these stand- 
ards incorporated into the daily life and teaching she has produced through 
her one hundred and sixteen years women of high character and notable 
leadership in many fields of activity. 

In the field of education, Mary Robbins Hillard, Abbot 1883, founder 
and headmistress of Westover School for twenty-five years, until her death in 
1932, was a distinguished predecessor of the group of Abbot graduates who 
are now headmistresses and deans of private schools, and whose photographs 
are presented here. 

Each of these women has the rare ability to remember her school days, 
and thus understand more thoughtfully the mind of the young girl. Margaret 
Speer has said, "I am having great fun here and think back to Abbot days 
very often as I try to look at things from a boarding school girl's point of 



view." 



In the recently published life of Mary Hillard, by Bishop John T. Dallas, 
he quotes her approach to youth, which is the same as that of our twentieth 
century educators. "To those spending a lifetime in the service of education, 
the most fascinating aspect of the work with the young is the constant re- 
emergence, with a freshness and novelty like that of a new discovery, of the 
sensitiveness of youth to 'real existence, colorless, formless, intangible, visible 
only to the intelligence that sits at the helm of the soul.' The need of youth is 
to find and experience this existence." 

The objective of leaders of youth today is ably expressed by Abbot's 
headmistress, Marguerite Hearsey, when she says: "We believe that our best 
contribution during the war years will be made by providing for our students 
conditions which will be as healthful and safe as possible, and sound psy- 
chologically. We cannot and would not shield them from the impact and 
implications of the war, but it is our hope that when they graduate they will 
have physical endurance and mental vigor, and that they will be well-bal- 
anced emotionally. Beneath and beyond this, it will be our constant endeavor 
to develop in them spiritual resources which will sustain them in the ines- 
capably difficult years that lie ahead." 

Abbot has more than noble traditions, with these she has blended a vital, 
living spirit, as shown in these, her representatives, leaders in other schools, 
and in her present efforts to train leaders for a future world in which they 
will be sorely needed. 

Kj. -T. Cj. 



What to Read? 

Alice C. Sweeney, 1914 

On the assumption that many of our readers may feel, particularly this 
summer, a desire to escape from the impact of daily war bulletins and the 
weight of world problems, back into the quiet world of books we are giving 
below a few suggestions for reading. 

We have arbitrarily limited the number of titles to twenty-five, and so 
far as kind and contents is concerned the selection of books has been just 
about as arbitrary; but the list is launched in the confidence that suggestions 
are a help to ultimate discovery and if these books are not what you want, 
the search for them may lead you to others of their kind which are to your 
taste. 



DO YOU WANT TO KNOW 
INTERESTING PEOPLE? 

The Autobiography of Montaigne, M. 

Lowenthal 
Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough, K. 

Campbell 
The Letters and Friendships of Cecil 

Spring Rice 
The Letters of Gertrude Bell 
Sutter's Gold, B. Cendras 
The Autobiography of A. A. Milne 



POETRY 

The Name and Nature of Poetry, A. E. 

Housman 
Discovering Poetry, Elizabeth Drew 
The Oxford Book of Modern Verse 

HAVE YOU REALLY READ? 

• 

Meditations of Marcus Aurelius 
Moby, Dick, Melville 
Jean Chris tophe, R. Rolland 
Candide, Voltaire 



BACKGROUNDS FOR THE 

NEWS 

The Greek Commonwealth 

Learning and Leadership, Alfred Zim- 

mern 
Englishmen, Frenchmen and Spaniards, 

Madariaga 
Chartres and Mont Saint Michel, H. 

Adams 
The Modern Theme, Ortega y Gasset 



RANDOM SUGGESTIONS 

Shakespeare Without Tears, Margaret 

Webster 
The Gobi Desert, M. Cable 
The Art of Friendship, A. Bonnard 
Giants in the Earth, Rolvaag 
Ultima Thule, H. H. Richardson 
Amenities of Book Collecting, E. A. 

Newton 
From These Roots, Mary Colum 



An Invitation 



One of the lesser disasters of the war is the havoc that it has played with 
our school and college calendars. No longer is June the month of graduation. 
In these recent years Commencements have come in almost any month of 
the year and the "pomp and circumstance" of pre-war graduation is some- 
what muted. But, in spite of the unusually early date and other vicissitudes, 
we hope to have a beautiful and inspiring weekend for our Abbot Commence- 
ment this year. Draper Dramatics will be "Romeo and Juliet," with partici- 
pants of the age Shakespeare had in mind when he dreamed of and wrote the 
play; and the concert on Sunday night will be, as it always is, a charming 
and amazingly competent program. The speakers both for the Baccalaureate 
Sermon, and the Commencement Address on Monday, are very special. 

But it is not so much for the program that the school invites the Alumnae 
to return, if they can. It is for the joy and refreshment that you can find in 
this familiar old, youthful place, and for the renewing of friendships that 
have been so much a part of your life. 

Travel restrictions doubtless prevent the return of those who live far away — 
but there are many within a comparatively nearby radius of Andover and, 
so absorbing are the demands of our busy lives that we go often for years 
without seeing Abbot friends who live perhaps only twenty-five miles away. 
If you can plan a pilgrimage to Abbot this spring — if only for one day, May 
nineteenth, — you will find it rewarding. You will be warmly welcome, and 
even if the menu for lunch and dinner may not be filet mignon at least you 
will not have to prepare it yourselves, nor do the dishes afterwards ! All who 
return are cordially invited to have dinner in the school dining room on 
Saturday night! 

My greetings and best wishes to every alumna — however far away — and 
the hope that many nearby may be able to reunite for at least a day and see 
the way your Abbot and your "little sisters" of today are carrying on the old 
and creating the new as they live and study here. 



(^ / ^Ct*~<L4-isi<+>* t- r-r^asist*. 




You are invited to attend the 
One hundred and sixteenth Commencement of 

Abbot Academy 
May eighteenth to May twenty-first 

PROGRAM 

May i 8, 7.30 p.m. 

Tree and Ivy Planting 
Singing on Steps of Abbot Hall 

May 19 

Alumnae Day 

Class Reunion Luncheons 

Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association, 2.45 p.m. 

Draper Dramatics, "Romeo and Juliet," 8 p.m. 

May 20 

Baccalaureate 10.45 a.m. South Church 

Sermon by The Rev. John Edgar Park, D.D., President 

Emeritus of Wheaton College 
Commencement Concert 7.30 p.m. 

May 21 

Graduation Exercises 10 a.m. South Church 
Address by The Rev. James T. Cleland, D.D. 
Chaplain at Amherst College 

Class Reunion Chairmen 

1890 Miss Jessie Guernsey, 28 Sagamore Ave., West Medford, 55 

1895 Mrs. Carl Kelsey (Gertrude Haldeman), Mendenhall, Pa. 

1900 Miss Mary E. Bancroft, Andover 

1905 Mrs. William S. Knickerbocker (Frances Cutler), Loomis School, 

Windsor, Conn. 
1910 Mrs. Owen Morgan (Emily Silsby), 55 High Ridge Rd., West Hart- 
ford, Conn. 
1 91 5 Miss Marion Brooks, 134 Charles St., Boston 

1920 Mrs. William Kurth (Isabel Sutherland), 300 No. Main St., Andover 
1925 Mrs. Merrill Hay (Evelyn McDougall), Cape Cottage, Maine 
1930 Mrs. Robert U. Ingraham (Kathie Fellows), 311 Conestoga Rd., 

Wayne, Pa. 
1935 Mrs. Harry L. MacCready, Jr. (Barbara Chamberlain), 421 W. 

DeSoto St., Pensacola, Fla. 
1940 Mrs. Philip D. Wilson, Jr. (Jeanne Cowles), 3 Poplar Place, Boston 
1944 Miss Molly Hubbard, Lake Erie College, Painesville, Ohio 



I 



Alumnae Day, May 19 

During the noon hours 12- 1.30, Mrs. Chipman will serve a buffet 
luncheon, at a moderate charge, at her home, 5 Morton Street. It is essential 
that reservations be made in advance. 

Dinner will be served to alumnae in the school dining room with the school 
at 6.15 p.m. Please mail reservations for lunch, dinner, and rooms at once. 

The annual meeting of the Alumnae Association will be held at 2.45 p.m. 
in Abbot Hall. 

APPLICATIONS FOR RESERVATIONS 

Please tear out and mail the following applications for reservations at once to 
The Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Andover, Mass. 



I wish to reserve a double. . . room; a single. . .room; for May 18. . ., May 
19. . ., May 20. . .. 



Name Class 

(Maiden name) .' 

(Address) Postal District No. 



I expect to attend the Alumnae luncheon, served from 12- 1.30, at Mrs. 
Chipman's home, 5 Morton St., Andover, May 19. 



Name Class 

(Maiden name) 

(Address) Postal District No. 



I expect to attend dinner with the school, May 19, at 6 p.m. 

Name Class 

(Maiden name) 

Address Postal District No. 



Abbot Clubs 



BOSTON (1892): President, Mrs. Gwen- 
dolyn Bloomfield Tillson, '22; Vice-presidents, 
Mrs. Virginia Gay d'Elseaux '28; Mrs. 
Elizabeth Sage Batchelder '33; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. Louise Risley Floyd '37; 
Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Marion Conant 
Ireland '27; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Nay 
Gramkow '27; Auditor, Mrs. Mary Piper 
Sears '28; Program Chairman, Mrs. Faith 
Chipman Parker '31; Directors 1944- 1946, 
Mrs. Katharine Allen Babson '31, Mrs. 
Martha Ransom Tucker '37, Miss Priscilla 
Richards '31. Directors 1945-1947, Mrs. 
Lydia Kunkel Eldredge '21, Miss Irene 
Atwood '18, Mrs. Ruth Baker Johnson '30. 

The Alumnae Association and the Boston 
Club held their spring meeting on April 7, 
at the College Club, Boston. Following the 
annual meeting and election of new officers 
for the Abbot Club, Miss Atwood turned the 
meeting over to Mrs. d'Elseaux, Vice-presi- 
dent of the Alumnae Association, who pre- 
sided in the absence of the President, Mrs. 
Roberta Kendall Kennedy. Miss Hearsey 
spoke on Abbot, and Mrs. Alice Dixon Bond 
gave a delightful book review. 

CHICAGO (1921): President, Mrs. J. 
Allen Lind (Mary Simpson); Secretary, Mrs. 
Edith Bullen Creeden, 461 Hill Rd., Win- 
netka; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Hall Walker. 

CONNECTICUT (1923): President, Miss 
Sara Peck, 20 Fairview Ter., Derby; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Lawton Cheney, 
36 Morse St., Hamden. 

The Connecticut club plans to have some 
regional meetings in May. The regular an- 
nual meeting for the state will be held early 
in the fall. 

DETROIT (1922): President, Mrs. Thom- 
as Nalle (Harriet Balfe), 121 1 Willow Lane, 
Birmingham. 



MAINE, EASTERN (1926): President, 
Miss Eleanor Bird, 250 Broadway, Rockland; 
Vice-President, Mrs. Frances McDougall 
McLoon; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. An- 
netta Richards Bryant, Round Pond. 

MAINE, WESTERN (1922): President, 
Mrs. Harold Robinson (Harriette Woolver- 
ton), Cape Elizabeth; Treasurer, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Baldwin Frohock. 

NEW YORK (1898): President, Miss 
Gertrude Holbrook '25; Vice-presidents, Mrs. 
Laura Scudder Williamson '24, Mrs. Helga 
Lundin Buttrick '23; Recording Secretary, Mrs. 
Grace Leyser Boynton '19; Corresponding 
Secretary, Mrs. Jane Owsley Warwick '30; 
Directors, Mrs. Helen Danforth Prudden '13, 
Mrs. Eunice Meigs Pease '21, Mrs. Ethel 
Thompson James '24. 

The spring meeting was held on April 14, 
at the Hotel New Weston, at 12.30. Follow- 
ing the election of new officers, the club was 
happy to welcome Miss Hearsey, and Miss 
Margaret Speer 191 8, Headmistress of the 
Shipley School. 

OHIO, CENTRAL (1921): President, 
Secretary, Mrs. Paul Meek (Louise Norpell), 
5600 Meek Rd., Worthington. 

OHIO, CLEVELAND (1927): President, 
Mrs. George Worthington (Madeleine Fiske), 
Chesterland, Ohio. 

OLD COLONY (1924): President, Mrs. 
Richard M. Thompson (Ruth Niles), 300 
Woodlawn St., Fall River; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Mrs. Louise Thompson Cortrell, 
372 Madison St., Fall River. 

PITTSBURGH (1921): President, Mrs. 
George H.Jackson (Gertrude Miller) , Butler, 
Pa.; Secretary, Mrs. Joseph M. Browne (Eliza 
Atwell), 529 Pine Rd., Sewickley. 



8 



Felicitations I 



Congratulations are due Miss Hearsey, who in February was elected 
President of the National Association of Principals of Schools for Girls. 

Congratulations are due the school as the following members of the 
faculty complete decades, or a decade of service. The Alumnae Association 
extends to them its happy recognition, and best wishes. Mary Carpenter, for 
twenty years Director of Physical Education; Louise Robinson for twenty 
years assistant Financial Secretary; Alice Sweeney, teacher of English for ten 
years, and Barbara Humes, assistant to the Principal for ten years. 



School Calendar for May 



May 



5 
6 



ii 

12 



r 3 

18-21 

Sept. 18 



Abbot Birthday Celebration 
Vespers; The Rev. Sidney 

Lovett, D.D., Chaplain 

Yale University 
"A" Society Picnic 
Field Day 
Senior Banquet 
Organ Recital, Walter Howe 
Commencement 
Opening of fall term 



Cum Laude Awards — April, ig4$ 

Barbara Beecher 
Martha Ann Boynton 
Gretchen Fuller 
Sally Leavitt 
Grace Lurton 
Hilary Paterson 
Shirley Sommer 
Madge Twomey 
Holly Welles 



In Memoriam 



1879 



Millie Berry, wife of Henry P. Keith, died 
on March 8, in Hollis, N. Y. 

1881 

Sarah Puffer, widow of Monroe Spencer 
McCay, died on February 11, in Winter 
Park, Florida. 

1882 

Caroline Knowles, wife of Alfred O. 
Doane, died on February 13, at the age of 
eighty years. 

1884 

Alfreda Johnson, widow of Frank C. Bol- 
ton, died March 17, in Baltimore, Md. She 
is survived by two sons, eight grandchildren 
and three great grandchildren. 

1886 

Kathreen A. Sanborn, wife of the late 
Robert M. McCulloch, died on February 4, 
in Redlands, California. 

1891 

Lena Hinchman, wife of the late Dr. 



Charles E. Townsend, died in Newburgh, 
N. Y., on February 26. Abbot has lost a 
loyal and devoted friend in Mrs. Town- 
send's passing. She was a generous contrib- 
utor to the needs of the school, as well as to 
the many church and civic organizations 
with which she was connected. In 191 6 she 
served a term as president of the New York 
Abbot Club. She is survived by her niece 
Evaline Korn, Abbot 1906. 

1893 

Lida Scott, wife of Scott Brown, died in 
Pasadena, Cal., June 19, 1943. 

1898 

Elizabeth Dowse Coolidge died in Sher- 
born, on February 15. 

1920 

Ruby Abbott, a bed invalid for nineteen 
years, died on April 5, in Brookline. She 
kept a keen interest in Abbot, and her con- 
stant companion was a cocker, given her by 
an Abbot friend. 



Class News 



The response of personal news items which have been returned with 
the trustee ballots, and through class reunion appeals, comprise the 
great part of these class news items. In the back of this Bulletin is a 
page ready for your use for the October issue. Keep 'em coming/ Mews 
of you is wanted! 



1877 

Ellen Emerson Cary is rejoicing in the news 
that her son Frank has been released from 
a Jap prison camp, and her daughter Alice is 
in Honolulu. 

1880 

Emma Chadbourne Wood writes "A. A. is a 
touch stone to every loyal heart, and to her 
I owe much for helpfulness to my husband 
in various parishes for over forty years." 
She signed her note of reminiscences ' ' Little 
Emma C," of Gladys Hasty Carroll's 
" Dunnybrook. " 

1860-1891 

Class Funds Secretary: Mrs. Ernest C. 
Young (Ruth Childs) 6 Emerson St., Brook- 
line. 

1881 

Emma Abbott Allen says, "Some are born 
great, some have greatness thrust upon 
them," I am a proud great-grandmother of 
two dear boys, Benjamin Bray ton, five years, 
and Abbott Allen Br ay ton two years old. 
I am living with my son, Abbott Allen in 
West Medford. 

1886 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frank W. 
Darling (Mary Gorton) Hampton, Virginia. 

Mrs. Darling held a reunion of her famous 
class at the meeting of the Boston Abbot 
Club, on April 7. Present with herself were: 
Jennie Lanphear Buck, Harriet Raymond 
Brosnan, Frances Swazey Parker and Lucia 
Trevitt Auryansen. 

1887 

From Ernestine Wyer Mears, "Life, we 
have been long together, In sunshine and in 
stormy weather," mostly sunshine as room- 
mate of Jessie Guernsey in old German Hall. 
Later for forty-five years in a Congregational 
Manse, five splendid children caring for us 
now, and all active in life's busiest, most 
helpful and necessary places." 



1875 
Seventieth Anniversary 

Greetings and love from the girl of yester- 
day to the youth of today! 

Let me whisper in your ear that growing 
old is no fun, with eyes that grow dim and 
ears that do not hear so well, with hands 
that could not be depended upon to do your 
will, an engine working overtime and no 
extra pay! Such are my embellishments! 

The two years I spent at Abbot Academy 
are among the brightest of memories — that 
long hill covered with snow where we were 
allowed to coast occasionally on a sled guided 
by a "Theolog" was quite exciting after the 
study of the Constitution of the United 
States or Butler's Analogy. 

With best wishes to all my sister friends for 
happiness and peace. 

Mary Pierce Paine 
1536 Vine St., Denver, Col. 

1890 
Fifty-fifth Reunion 

There were only nine of us in 1890 and we 
never kept up a Round Robin letter as did 
1889. I wish we had. Two former school 
teachers are living today. Anna S. Johnston 
is in Mount Vernon, New York, where for 
years she taught in the High School. She is 
evidently up to her eyes in church work, 
Red Cross, Bundles for America, and civic 
interests in general. She belongs to two read- 
ing groups who like to have her review books 
for them, is near enough New York for Sat- 
urday operas and other delights, and surely 
must be all vigor as she writes of showing 
New York to her guests — supreme under- 
taking! She spends her summers with her 
brother and his family in Binghamton, 
N. Y., or at their Quaker Lake cottage. 

Jessie Elizabeth Guernsey retired officially 
at seventy in 1939, taught two more happy 
years in the mountains of North Carolina 



10 



(most beautiful state east of the Rockies), 
and so rounded out forty-five years of teach- 
ing, twenty-nine of them in the South. 

There are some class children and grand- 
children. Elizabeth Brainerd married Prof. 
Carl Copping Plehn, well known economist 
of the University of California. Of their two 
children, Prof. Plehn writes that the son, 
Brainerd, who has a little daughter, has 
recently given up a professorship in engin- 
eering at Stanford University, and is with 
the Standard Oil Co. in Berkeley. The 
daughter, Mary Elizabeth, is now Mrs. 
Robert L. Roe and has moved from Berkeley 
to the Carmel Valley. They have a little girl 
two years old. 

Of Edie Dewey Jones' two daughters, 
Catharine is Mrs. Edgar A. Wotten of Con- 
cord, Mass. She is Associate Prof, of Biology 
at Simmons College, and Mr. Wotten is in a 
Hingham Navy Shipbuilding unit. After 
weeks of anxiety over their only son, reported 
missing, they have learned that he gave his 
life in battle in France last December. They 
have one daughter. Edie's other daughter 
Hilda, now Mrs. May, lives in Rochester, 
N. Y., where Mr. May is professor of Mod- 
ern History in the University of Rochester. 
They have two sons who, according to their 
aunt, Kathleen Jones '89, are very fine 
young folks. 

I wish I knew whether there are other 
children or grandchildren of the class. 

And now I am wondering what to try to 
tell of the enriching of experiences by years 
at Abbot. It is one's early school that counts 
most indelibly. I am devoted to Columbia, 
but it was the stimulus of Abbot which took 
me there in search of degrees, and to later 
summer sessions there, and in other univer- 
sities. Such teaching as we had at Abbot! 

Last year's May Bulletin and its letter 
from Dr. Jane L. Greeley sent me back in 
memory to her superb teaching of Latin. 
Miss Emily Means made Saturday morning 
drawing and painting a key to the joys of a 
life-time, and both Miss Greeley and Miss 
Means gave inspiring influence as well as 
wonderful teaching. Miss Kelsey, Miss Abby 
Mitchell and Miss Kimball were also great 
teachers, only Miss Kimball deserted us and 
got married. Not that we knew then what 
these teachers did for us. It took the years to 
teach us that. Let the Faculty of today 
remember. 

Is there anything that the History of Art 



has not touched? We were at Beni Hassan in 
Egypt. I had a picture of that in my art 
scrap book and pictures of Luxor and Kar- 
nak. Art museums in Dresden and Berlin, 
in London and Paris, the Hermitage in 
Leningrad, the Uffizi and the Pitti in Flor- 
ence, the Prado in Madrid, the museums in 
this country; old friends of the Abbot art 
course in all of them. 

French and German Halls did wonders in 
creating lovers of Modern Languages with 
an understanding of the two countries. My 
three years in German Hall paid great 
dividends during summers in Germany, 
once a summer course at Heidelberg Uni- 
versity; tramping in the Harz, the Black 
Forest, the Fichtel Gebirge, secure in the 
knowledge that the language would be 
no barrier to the friendly relations every- 
where. Memories of Goethe and Schiller in 
Weimar, in Frankfurt, and on the Brocken 
brought back charming Fraulein Bodemeyer 
and Fraulein Heitmuller. One summer, I 
surprised Fraulein Schiefferdecker at Pretch 
auf der Elbe. 

Abbot didn't make me teach History; fate 
did that. And Abbot, as far as I know, didn't 
send me South to teach colored people, but 
some kind fate did. Out of twenty-seven 
years in colored schools, the last ten were 
spent in St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, 
N. C, under the Episcopal Church. When 
one adds to the all-sufficient joys of teaching, 
a student body many of whom are artistic, 
musical, dramatic, spiritually gifted and yet 
are denied their fair chance of opportunity, 
years are rich indeed. 

The Abbot Courant did much for us in the 
old days, for which we are grateful. But a 
priceless gift which must not be left out is the 
everlasting permanence of Abbot friendships. 
Mary G. Peabody '89, my roommate for one 
year, landed me in my first teaching position 
where I stayed for sixteen years; she was in 
New York teaching in the Horace Mann 
School when I went to Columbia, and is still 
the friend of old days. 

From all signs, Abbot girls of today are of 
fine quality, and the idea of today's activ- 
ities including the discussion of present-day 
problems which Miss Hearsey's delightful 
January letter gives makes one wish one 
could send one's friends to Andover. Social 
opportunities sound so human! In our day, 
no dangerous boy from Phillips was allowed 
to call unless he was a relative, or was some- 



II 



one known before we came to Abbot. To be 
sure, there were the theologues from the 
Seminary then on the hill. They were favored 
callers at any time, perhaps for that very 
reason not considered very desirable! 

I am glad the girls of today do not study 
Fairchild's "Moral Philosophy," Wright's 
"Christian Evidences," or Butler's "Anal- 
ogy." I am sure the girls get in other ways 
what those awe-inspiring volumes were sup- 
posed to give us. 

Last year's May Bulletin with its pic- 
tures of returning classes was most interest- 
ing. I wish I could go to this year's Com- 
mencement, but I fractured rxiy hip when in 
Kansas in '42, and my activities are still de- 
cidedly curtailed. A crutch and cane do not 
lend themselves to much gadding about. 
Good wishes I shall send in abundance. 
Jessie Elizabeth Guernsey, 
28 Sagamore Ave., 
West Medford 55, Mass. 

Anna Sophia Wells Bigelow writes, "After 
eighteen years as Executive Secretary with 
the New York City Missionary Society, I 
retired, February 1944, to this corner of 
Paradise (Seven Acres, Wilton, Conn.), with 
friends, piano, reading, knitting. Waiting 
for the snow to disappear, so gardening can 
begin." 

1891 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Daniel B. 
Hardenbergh (Annie Bull), 7 Orchard St., 
Middletown, N. Y. 

1892 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane B. Car- 
penter, School St., Andover. 

Nettie Heritage Warner's son, Dr. Stanley 
B. Warner, is head of the Cancer Research 
laboratory in Springville, N. Y. This labora- 
tory is part of the State Institute for the study 
of Malignant Diseases in Buffalo, N. Y. 

1893 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Harry R. 
Miles (Anna Nettleton), 4 Rock Ledge 
Drive, Stamford, Conn. 

1894 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Doremus 
Scudder (Mabel Scudder), 133 West Ninth 
St., Claremont, Cal. 

Mrs. Scudder is coming east to see her 
granddaughters, and include Abbot Com- 
mencement. 



1895 

Fiftieth Reunion 

Dear Classmates: I have written twelve 
letters asking you to write a letter for our 
Fiftieth Reunion. At first I thought I could 
never do it, but each letter became easier 
to write and when I had written the twelfth 
I felt as though I had visited with each of you 
and was almost fifty years younger. I enjoyed 
it and wonder if it was because I did all the 
talking, and I hope you will get as much of 
a thrill reading the letters in the Bulletin 
as I have from the friendly notes you have 
sent me. I have often thought I spent too 
much time getting the Courant out of the deep 
end instead of trying to create a deeper and 
more loyal class feeling. I think the Bulletin 
is a big improvement over the Courant 
which I never read, but, I do look over the 
Bulletin and always find notes about some 
one I knew at Abbot. 

You probably know that six of our class 
have slipped away, but we are still a majority. 

For the past forty years I have lived in the 
country, twenty-nine miles west of Phila- 
delphia, and don't let anyone tell you there 
is ever a dull moment in the country, for 
nature and animals are always changing and 
interesting. Of course it is confining but 
during this time I have made four trips from 
coast to coast by auto and before the days 
of good roads and camps, sort of pioneering, 
which made it far more interesting. Then a 
trip to Cuba and Jamaica with Eliza Cox, 
one to Alaska as far north as Circle, above 
the Arctic Circle, with fourteen days on a 
small wood burning boat on the Yukon, and 
my last trip in 1938 to Battle Harbor, Lab- 
rador, with Helen Muzzey. And I can 

assure you she is an Ai travelling compan- 
ion. We are planning and hoping to have 
one more trip before we need wheel chairs. 

If any of you are ever in my neighborhood 
do come and see me. You will have a warm 
welcome from all but my Silver Persian. 
She is very sweet and so shy. 

Affectionately yours, 
Gertrude Haldeman Kelsey, 
Reunion Chairman 

Mendenhall, Pa. 

In Loving Memory of: May Churchill, 
Mabel Duren, Helen Jackson, Hope Pike, 
Edith Pond and Alice Purrington, Mrs. Kel- 
sey has given S300. to the Abbot Scholarship 



12 




CLASS OF 1895 

Front row: Edith Pond, Elizabeth Cox, Caroline Wilbur, Hope Pike. 

Second row: Kirty Eddy, Laura Wentworth, Harriet Forsyth, Gertrude Haldeman, Grace 

Simonton, Alice Brittan, Gertrude Miller. 
Back row: May Churchill, Bessie Adams, Elizabeth Muzzey, Alice Purington, Helen Jackson, 

Gertrude Flint, Charlotte Drury, Mabel Duren, Elizabeth Smith. 



Fund. Si 00. additional has also been pre- 
sented to the Fund by members of the class. 

Dear Classmates: I was greatly pleased 
to have Gertrude Haldeman Kelsey's letter 
asking for one from me in celebration of our 
50th Anniversary. It doesn't seem possble 
fifty years have passed since I left Abbot. On 
the whole life has been wonderful. If it were 
not for the war I should have gone to Abbot 
for this big event. The friends made there 
have meant so much to me through the 

Gertrude Miller Jackson, 

515 No. McKean St., Butler, Pa. 

Dear Classmates: Greetings and Happy 
Memories from your Secretary and Treas- 
urer "Coxie." I did hold that office, didn't 
I? You don't remember? Neither do I for 
sure. After leaving Abbot, I studied, trav- 
elled, worked and married William N. Hutt 



of North Carolina. During Mr. Hutt's life- 
time (he died in 1937), we lived in North 
Carolina part of the year but spent the sum- 
mer months in my home state, New York. 
I still continue that routine, summers in 
Ellenville, N. Y. and winters in Southern 
Pines, which as I write is a bower of beauty 
with the purple wisteria and dogwood in 
bloom. 

Since leaving Abbot I have kept in touch 
with my good friends Gertrude Haldeman 
Kelsey and Laura Wentworth Richards. One 
winter I met Bess Adams in Southern Pines, 
N. C. and once I met Bess Muzzey on 5th Ave. 
New York. It is remotely possible that I 
shall be among those who appear in person 
at the reunion. If that does not occur may the 
years ahead be joyous ones for you. 



Anne Elizabeth Cox Hutt 
7 Yankee Place, Ellenville, N. 



Y. 



13 






Dear 1895 Classmates: I wonder if you 
are feeling as young as I, and as astonished to 
find that its really fifty years since we grad- 
uated and said good-bye to each other. 

My travels began in 1900 when I had a 
delightful European trip with the parents of 
Charlotte Draper, an Abbot friend, Dr. 
Draper led a party of seven of us young people 
through seven countries that summer, each 
one of them now so sadly changed. While in 
Brussells I saw Kirk Eddy's name above 
mine in a lace shop and tried to trace her 
without success. 

A few quiet years at home were punc- 
tuated by fascinating experiences in the 
Kentucky mountains. One summer I actually 
worked there riding horse-back to the little 
cabins, running a Sunday School, and helping, 
with a sewing group. That was taking the 
place of a real missionary. Later as a Board 
member, I visited the Mission several times. 

After my Father's death my Mother and I 
went to sunny California to be with my sister, 
sent home from India on leave. After a year, 
she recovered and her Danish fiance arriving, 
we all four travelled to New Brunswick where 
she was married and left to return to the 
Mission field. 

After my Mother's death I took a trip 
around the world on one of those famed 
Dollar Liners. I stayed eight months in 
India with my sister and her growing family, 
also I had glimpses of Japan and China 
where I visited friends. 

In 1938, just before war broke out, my 
brother and I went to Denmark where my 
sister's family are now living, sad to say. 

During three long stays in California I saw 
much of Mabel Bosher Scudder, '94. It was a 
real privilege. 

For the past ten years I have been living 
in New York where one can find endless 
ways to occupy time and strength. With all 
its faults I'm strong for life in this metropolis! 

I'm looking forward eagerly to hear what 
other 1 895 friends have been doing. 

Sincerely, 
Charlotte K. Drury, 
304 West 75th St., N.Y.C. 23 

Dear Abbot and Class of 1895: Writing 
is difficult for I fear I do not know what or 
how much to say. To realize that it is fifty 
years since our graduation is well nigh im- 
possible. 

It has been a busy and happy life but 



nothing out of the usual. My husband has 
been gone more than eight years but I have 
my two daughters who are a great joy and 
comfort. Lucy Shaw Schultz Abbot '24, and 
Wellesley '28, lives in Flint. She has a 
daughter nine, and son six, She leads a very 
full life with Junior League, Nursing service, 
and many civic affairs added to the regular 
duties. Elizabeth Shaw Carter lives with me, 
and is very active in Red Cross work. My 
war work consists chiefly of knitting, there 
being always an army or navy sweater on the 
needles. It would be fine if our class could 
get together but present conditions make 
that an impossibility. 

My best wishes go to all and everyone. 
Kirty Eddy Shaw, 
1903 Center Ave., Bay City, Mich. 

Dear Girls of 1895: It is hard to realize 
that fifty years have passed since we grad- 
uated from Abbot but I suppose it must be 
true. 

I haven't anything interesting to tell about 
myself. My husband died ten years ago, 
and one of my daughters is married and lives 
in Alabama. Frances is at home with me, 
and both girls are very busy with war work. 
I can't do anything active and my war work 
has been knitting socks. We live here in 
Maiden through the winter and about the 
first of May we pack ourselves, our two dogs 
and two cats in the car and go to our sum- 
mer home in New Castle, N. H. to stay until 
it gets really cold in the Fall. It's very inter- 
esting there. The Portsmouth Navy Yard is 
very near, and the boats go very close to our 
shore. We have the Army there too, and 
during the first year of the war it was really 
quite exciting at times. The war seemed 
much nearer there than it does here. 

We have had a vegetable garden for the 
last two years and did a lot of canning, and 
expect to continue while the war lasts. I shall 
enjoy reading your letters in the Bulletin. 
It is really the only kind of a reunion I could 
enjoy as I couldn't come up to Abbot. 

Affectionately, 
Gertrude Flint Grier 
141 Summer St., Maiden, Mass. 

Dear Classmates: I greet you each, as 
you vividly come before me, looking just 
as you did in '95! The years between have 
been busy ones for me, many, as you know, 
spent in the Library at Lexington at most 



H 



congenial work. I can't tell you how often 
my grateful thoughts have gone back to our 
English class, as I have passed among the 
library shelves, handling the familiar books 
that were made to live for us, by Miss Ingall's 
inspiring teaching. Our Art course too, I 
have enjoyed over the years, especially on a 
trip Abroad. 

I resigned from the Library in 1941, after 
a serious case of pneumonia made me 
realize it was time to quit, and have some 
fun, while I was still young! I have been 
enjoying my leisure to the full, with many 
interests, and a large family circle. I spent 
two winters in Florida with my niece and 
namesake, another winter in Texas, and 
frequently visit my brother in New York. A 
quaint cottage at Annisquam on Cape Ann, 
is the family's favorite summer hang-out and 
I come and go there. The last few summers 
I have been Hostess at our historic Buckman 
Tavern, calling this my war work. 

We welcome hundreds of service men and 
women, and the work is most interesting. I 
only wish I might tell you about it. 

I expect to be at Abbot for the Commence- 
ment festivities and shall look for some of you 
to help me celebrate our anniversary, and 
revive our happy memories. 

Lovingly yours, 
Helen Elizabeth Muzzey, 
14 Glen Road, 
Lexington 73, Mass. 

Dear Ninety-fivers: After all fifty years 
is a very short time, looking backwards. It is 
only when we think of friends who were here 
yesterday, but gone today, that we realize 
how time has slipped by. Like all the rest 
I've had glad and sad days. But the glad ones 
are easier to remember. 

Since my marriage in '96 I've lived in 
Rhode Island, Pawtucket, to be exact. So, 
though Rhode Island is now home, and I 
would not change it; New Hampshire will 
always have its sentimental value. 

Until World War 1, life seemed fairly 
stable. For me that was a busy time; with 
canning centers, where without the aid of 
pressure cookers, we canned innumerable 
quarts of vegetables, Rhode Island stressed 
infant care. At that time Dr. Richards was 
interested in Public Health work, and was 
for years after, State Commissioner of 
Health. So perhaps it was natural that 
Pawtucket should be my responsibility, with 



its innumerable baby clinics, their primary 
objective that of reducing infant mortality. 

The 1 91 8 Flu epidemic gave us my 
brother's three children to supplement our 
two. My hobbies are old fashioned pa- 
triotism, antiques and genealogy, the latter 
has taught me the art of typing, home style. 

Dr. Richards passed away in 1939. My 
daughter Olive and I live together. She is a 
treasure. Since her graduation from Pem- 
broke College, she has been at Brown in 
various capacities. She is now the Chief 
Registration Counselor for the students. At 
present most of her work deals with the 
Naval R.O.T.C. Unit, and V-12 stationed 
there. My son, Byron Jr., is in business in 
Pawtucket. He married a Pawtucket girl, 
who has become a dear daughter. They have 
three children. Needless to say, I am very 
proud of them all. Ross, seventeen is at 
Tabor Academy. He is my sailor grandson, 
and is well known at Hyannis and on the 
rest of the Cape, for his ability to sail off with 
first prizes in both junior and senior boats. 
In last summer's hurricane their home was 
moved about a quarter of a mile inland, 
where it rests crazily in a peat bog, and the 
land from which it was carried is non-ex- 
is tant. Thirteen-year-old Dudley devotes his 
spare time to figure skating; and is now 
Eastern States Junior Champion. Susan, at 
nine, is just Sue and sweet. 

Though I've not returned many times to 
Abbot, it has not been forgotten. To all of us, 
Abbot stands for more than we sometimes 
realize. It has implanted in all of us those 
things which have made us richer mentally 
and spiritually. Some we realize, more we 
don't. Art appreciation, under Miss Chad- 
bourne, is something which has meant much 
to me, as I have travelled in tne old and new 
world. 

And still the good work goes on. Abbot 
today has its values for present day girls; 
they may be different, but are just as real, 
and their influence as far reaching. 

Hoping to see you all in May, 

Laura Wentworth Richards, 
88 Cottage St., 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

Agnes Brown, a special student that year, 
has for many years, been town treasurer of 
Rye, N. H., besides many interests in town 
and church affairs. She plans to attend the 
class reunion. 



*5 



1896 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Henry V. 
Conant (Ruth Loring), 914 High St., Ded- 
ham. 

Carolyn Mathews Mohn says, "My Rev- 
erend husband and I had the pleasure of 
having a reunion here (Paterson, N. J.) in 
February with Helen Muzzey and Winifred 
Brownell Freeman. Youth hasn't deserted 
them and they recounted many reminders 
of exciting Abbot days. Abbot can still count 
on us." 

Abbie Rockwell Young writes, "I have not 
been well the past nine years. Mr. Young 
and I have been spending six months each year 
in Florida for sixteen years. Thirteen years 
in Fort Myers, and last winter in St. Peters- 
burg, as the military had taken over much 
of the town of Fort Myers. This winter we 
remained at home on Cape Cod, but hope 
to go to Florida next October." 

1897 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Alexander 
Bunce (Gertrude Ware), R.F.D. 1, Rock- 
ville, Conn. 

Atala Lee Anthony Worrell has a son in the 
Navy, and a grandson in the Army. She has 
three sons, and seven grandchildren. 

Edith Morton Yoder is planning well! 
"Fifty-year reunions sound terribly antique 
but do not necessarily mean that we are all 
carrying canes or have white hair! Let the 
Class of 1897 do all in its power to be present 
in two years and begin now to plan for the 
event. It means a lot of work for our secre- 
tary but we'll begin by telling her that two 
of the class will hope to be there. Emily 
Willett Rowlands and myself!" 

!898 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert W. 
Dunbar (Selina Cook), 3 Elk St., Apt. 7, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Edith Tyer McFayden says, "My daughter 
Dr. Mary McFayden Bishop with her ten 
months old daughter Marion Holly, is with 
us for the duration, while her husband Dr. 
M. D. Bishop is overseas. Mary is busy in 
chest clinics at the County Hospital. 

Amy Stork Kydd's son Pfc. John Kydd Jr., 
is with the 182 nd Military Police somewhere 
in France. ),K; • 

1899 

Catherine Sandford is knitting afghans for 
Veterans Hospitals. 



1900 
Forty-fifth Reunion 

Dear "Girls" of 1900: A cordial wel- 
come awaits you here on May 19th. Do 
come and bring the latest news of yourselves 
and your families. 

Mary Bancroft, Reunion Chairman 
Main St., Andover, Mass. 

Alice Boutwell Pease sends interesting news 
of her family. "We have five grandchildren 
now, four boys and one girl. Brad, our oldest 
boy is a Major in the Army and is with the 
1 1 6th Evacuation Hospital with the 7th 
Army under General Patch. His wife and 
two boys are down here near us for a few 
months. Our daughter Barbara lives in 
Tacoma, Wash, and she has two boys. John, 
our second boy is not married, is a Naval 
Flight Surgeon on an air plane carrier in the 
Pacific. Ruth, our youngest daughter is 
married and has the only daughter. Her 
husband is an engineer in the Army and is 
stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington. We 
have a boat and go sailing whenever there is 
a good breeze. Good luck to reunion, sorry 
I can't be there." 

Mildred Guild Marshall writes, "My 
daughter and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dean Dieter are restoring an old house they 
bought in New Hampshire. My husband 
devotes most of his time to his art. He 
paints in water-colors and selects most of his 
subjects in Vermont and N. H. I collect 
book-plates and rare books. I have several 
poems published, and hope someday to pub- 
lish a book of my poems." 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur P. 
Spear (Grace Chapman), 156 Winchester 
St., Brookline. 

1901 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Helen Hale, 
86 Knox St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Ethel Brooks Scott has a sailor son in the 
Pacific, and a soldier son in Germany, both 
well when last heard from in February. 
"Old folks just keep pegging away." 

Harriet Lee writes that Tryon, S. C. is 
lovely now. She has relatives nearby. 

1902 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Hezekiah 
Poore (Mildred Mooers), 37 Ames St., Law- 
rence, Mass. 

Brownell Gage, husband of Delight Hall, 
died on February 3, at Bolton, Conn. 



16 



1904 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. William O. 
Pettit (Elizabeth Winsor), 186 Livingston 
Ave., New Brunswick, N.J. 

Helen Childs Baldwin writes of her family, 
"I have three children, one is married, one a 
teacher in Baltimore, and my son rejected 
for service, is doing war work here at home. 
I have two adorable grandchildren, a boy 
of three and a half and girl of two and a half; 
they live with their mother up over me, while 
their father is in service. I'm busy and well." 

Julia Wallace Gage's son Lt. Wallace M. 
Gage who has been hospitalized for the past 
six months, is now released and instructing 
at the New York State Maritime Academy, 
Fort Schuyler, N. Y. Lt. Gage previously 
served three years in the Merchant Marine 
in the Atlantic, and year and a half in the 
Navy in the Pacific. 

Julia Warren Pomeroy says, "Of my six 
children, five are married. My youngest 
Robert, is in his first year at West Point. Lt. 
William Pomeroy is a Pilot in the Air Trans- 
port Command, one daughter is in Signal 
Corps at Washington, D. C'The five older 
children graduated from the following 
colleges. Elizabeth, Mt. Holyoke; Marion, 
Syracuse, Library; Sarah, Syracuse Bus- 
iness; Theodore Jr. and William, M.I.T. and 
B. U. 

1905 

Fortieth Reunion 

We are about to have a Fortieth Reunion! 
How I wish I could be at Abbot to see those 
of you who can come back. We shall all, I 
know, be thinking of the classmates who are 
no longer here. And to many of us, I know, 
the war must have brought grief, and the 
long strain of waiting. I myself, am most 
fortunate, since our elder son is still an Army 
medical student and can be with his lovely 
wife. My husband and I are glad to be teach- 
ing in the school to which Charles went, and 
to be living near to my eighty-five year old 
but lively father. I think that all of us, as we 
grow older, live more and more in the great 
hopes of our time; most of all in that greatest 
hope of victory and "a just and lasting 
peace." 

Because I wanted to bring back to you 
some echoes of our far off school days, I have 
been reading this vacation the faded pages 



of my Abbot letters. Here are the glimpses of 
the Abbot of 1905, as recorded by the plump, 
serious school girl, that was I. They begin 
of course, with the stately, silver-haired 
rustling figure of Miss Means, scornfully 
pronouncing "gosh" and "d-a-r-n," as she 
berated us in Hall Exercises for our bad 
language! Once, when we had dared to 
complain about — you've guessed it — the 
food, she declared "That good manners 
were as difficult to inculcate as good taste." 
But, I added, The lunches did improve! 
Which of us has not approached her "Con- 
fessional" with quaking knees? Yet each of 
us, sometime discovered beneath that dread 
demeanor, her keen understanding of us 
and her gracious sympathy. And how she 
warmed to the romance that visited our 
faculty with the engagements of Miss Slocum 
and Miss Converse ! 

Space fails me to record my, mostly fond 
memories of the other teachers. Here are two 
glimpses. "There's the bell for silent time, I 
must learn my Bible lesson about the de- 
struction of Israel. Miss Howey has it." 
'Then we encountered Miss Knowles who 
reproved us for walking with arms locked, 
which we should never think of doing if we 
weren't so strenuously forbidden to." And 
this incredible picture, "We are obliged to 
play hockey in skirts six inches from the 
ground, so I shall have to shorten (sic!) my 
old one." 

And so, to Commencement, that drizzling 
June day when, draped in waterproofs and 
clutching our fluffy white skirts, we planted 
our class tree and ivy in the rain, and rode to 
church singing our class songs. 

So, as the Phillipians shouted under our 
windows after a football victory, "Rah, Rah, 
Emilee! Rah, Rah, Fern Sems." 

Frances Cutler Knickerbocker, 

Reunion Chairman 
The Loomis School Windsor, Conn. 

Kathryn Ahern sends Greetings and Best 
Wishes for happy years ahead. She writes, 
"After graduating from Radcliffe, I started 
teaching in the Lawrence High School and 
have been there ever since. For many years 
I have taught Junior and Senior Bookkeep- 
ing. Hardly think I can make reunion." 

Fannie Erving Arundale says, ' ' I plan now 
to come to Andover on May 19, for the 40th 
reunion of 1905. I was the only one of the 



17 



class there for the 30th. Hope others can 
make it this time. I have four grandchildren. 
Each of my sons having a boy and a girl. 
Joanne and Robert, and Charles and Janet. 

Alice Fuller Davenport and Fanny Hazen 
Ames regret they cannot attend reunion. 

Elsie Jeffers Hobbs writes, "I am some- 
what of an invalid with high blood pressure, 
so I do not do all I'd like to do. I do not 
expect to be back for reunion. Last June my 
husband retired from teaching in the Boys 
Latin School, Boston, so we picked up our 
posessions and came back to a little village, 
Kittery, Maine, that is full of war workers 
"on" the Navy Yard. I manage a simplified 
house keeping, a college club in Portsmouth, 
and have a church connection there." 

Ruth Pringle writes from Portland, 
Oregon, "I have not been able to attend any 
reunion since I left the east so many years 
ago. However I am still a loyal Abbot girl 
and read the Bulletin straight through. Tell 
the girls I am still teaching English in one of 
Portland's eight high schools. I am now 
alone in the world, but have a little house of 
my own and many kind friends. During 
the war I do Nurse's Aid work for five hours 
on Saturdays, and have just been asked by 
the Red Cross to go overseas! They failed to 
look up my age!" 

From Clara Searle Painter comes her news, 
"Still living in Minneapolis. Our three girls 
are east. Charlotte is a sophomore at Mt. 
Holyoke, Anne is an ensign in the Navy, 
stationed in Washington, Mary is doing 
economic research for the Board of Gover- 
nors of the Federal Reserve Bank, also in 
Washington. My term as Vice-president for 
the Northwest Central Region of American 
Association of University Women ends this 
spring. Go east for my last meeting this 
month. Have seen Ruth Mason Dunlop in 
Washington. 

Frances Tyer Crawford writes, "The up- 
to-datest Crawford news is: I am Associate 
Director of the Princeton University Person- 
nel Index which was set up in '42 for the 
purpose of steering Princeton alumni into 
the appropriate war appointments, both 
civilian and military. Now it turns in the 
opposite direction, that of steering them into 
jobs on their discharge from the services. My 
son, Lyndon, Naval Architect-Newport 
News Ship Yard, has a son, Douglas Gordon 
two years old. Bruce is 1st. Lt. Army Air 
Forces-Navigator, stationed in Italy. 



1906 

Rena Porter Hasting 's oldest son, Hudson 
Hastings Jr., was married on October 30, 
1944, to Betty J. Steigenvalt. 

Persis Mackintire Carr's oldest son, Lt. 
Winthrop Carr, will be in Annapolis for a 
year taking a post graduate course in Ap- 
plied Communications. Av. Cad. Robert was 
killed in an airplane crash in Fla. April 9. 

Maud Sprague spent a short time in Ham- 
ilton, Ontario, this winter, and on the way 
home visited Lulu McDuffie and her sister 
in their "charming bungalow" in Amster- 
dam, N. Y. 

1907 

Gladys Dudley Stephan has two grandsons, 
Charles 3rd, and Dudley Stephan, sons of 
her oldest daughter, Anne Stephan Kauf- 
master, of Seabord, Del. 

Alice Webster Brush's daughter Natalie is a 
sophomore at Pembroke College, where she 
is majoring in Art. 

1908 

Gertrude Caunt Barnes' \ 'husband Major 
Barnes, Army Air Corps, has been in Eng- 
land for fifteen months as Executive Officer 
for the 385th Fighter Squadron. 

Winifred Ogden Lindley reports her fam- 
ily's activities. J. M. Lindley Jr. is 2nd Lt. 
AAF stationed in Kansas, a Maintenance 
Engineer. Nelson O. Lindley, 2nd Lt. MAC 
is Administrative Officer at 168 General 
Hospital, France. Winifred, Radcliffe '43, 
was at Filene's in Boston, now finishing one 
year course at Katharine Gibbs, Boston. 

1909 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Gilbert L. 
Canterbury (Beulah McCarthy), 18th St., 
N.W. Canton 3, Ohio. 

Mary Bourne Boutell recently had lunch 
with Lloyd Pierce Smith '39, and young 
Cynthia a year and a half old. "Lloyd mar- 
ried my husband's nephew, Lt. Malcolm 
Smith a navigator on a transport plane, 
stationed at Patuxet, Md. We have had 
quite a family this winter and I haven't 
done much outside work. My father and 
mother are here from Maine as usual, and 
my husband's mother is with us. Our 
daughter Suzette Hopkins is at home, and 
her husband is in France. She has an inter- 
esting job with U.N.R.R.A. in the section 
that trains workers for overseas." 

Marjorie Soule Byers' daughter Patricia 



18 



graduates from high school in Denver, Col. 
in June, and hopes to enter either Stanford 
University, or Pomona College in the fall. 

Louise Norpell Meek's third daughter Emily 
Bradley, was married on December 7, 1944, 
to Walter B. Kleiner. 

Mary Stuart Kinder 's husband, Jean, is 
head of the War Man Power Commission in 
Nebraska. Mary is president of the Y.W.C.A. 
in Lincoln. 

Send that new address before September! 

Frances Wright Kimball spent last winter 
living with her youngest daughter Tappy, 
in Mexico City, where she renewed her Abbot 
friendship with Paula Jimeno Cabrera. 
She also travelled through Guatemala. 

1910 
Thirty-fifth Reunion 

Dear 1910'ERs: Do you realize that at this 
coming Commencement we are due for our 
35th Reunion? Thirty-five years is a long 
time and Abbot has had many changes and 
improvements. There will be many new and 
interesting things for us to see, and many old 
friends to meet. Let's all try to be there. I 
assure you it will be well worth the effort 
to come. Emily Sihby MoRGAN? 

Reunion Chairman 
55 High Ridge Road, 
West Hartford, Conn. 

Ruth Murray Moore says, "After living in 
the city of Brockton for thirty years, we have 
gone rural and live on a corner in West 
Bridgewater, with 15 acres, have 50 hens 
and plan on two pigs, and a large V garden. 
Are we helping the war effort?' ' 

Class Fund Chairman: Mrs. Myron G. 
Darby (Ethel Reigeluth) ,110 Tanglewylde 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

1911 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Douglas Don- 
ald (Edith Johnson), 8 Carisbrooke St., 
Andover. 

Charles C. Copeland, father of Margaret; 
Helen (Mrs. James A. Creighton), and 
Charlotte (Mrs. William D. B. Gray) 191 9, 
died on March 7. 

Mary Hall Lewis' daughter Jane Lewis 
Long with her granddaughter Mary Jane 
Long, born May 21, 1944, are living with 
her while her son-in-law, 2nd Lt. James S. 
Long USAF is in the South Pacific area. 



Dora Heys Pym's daughter Constance was 
married September 16, 1944 to Maurice 
Weiss, in Hamilton, Mr. Weiss is in the 
Production Dept. of General Electric, 
Lynn. 

Pvt. Henry Dresser, USMC, a Radar 
Operator, son of Corinne Willard Dresser, 
and grandson of Lizzie Gerrish Willard 1880, 
was killed in action November 22, 1944. His 
Lt. wrote, "He left only friends because he 
knew no bitterness." An older son, Willard, 
is now overseas. 

1912 

Helen Bowman Janney still lives in Mun- 
cie, Ind., where her husband is engaged in 
the practice of civil engineering. Her eldest 
child Helen, is married and living in Berea, 
Ohio. Catherine is a junior at Ball State 
Teachers's College. William is in training 
for naval aviation: Ben is a senior in high 
school. Besides being an excellent cellist, Ben 
is a commercial announcer over the local 
radio station and leads the local R.O.T.C. 
unit. He enters service in June. "Bow" is 
still active in musical and literary club and 
church work. 

Dorothy Dole O'Brien's son Frank Jr., is 
in the Air Corps. 

1913 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Margaret 
Wilkins, 279 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 

Enid Baush Patterson is in the Red Cross 
Arts and Skills Corps, teaching Leather- 
craft to bed patients at Cushing Hospital, 
Framingham two days a week, and also 
doing staff assistance work at Red Cross. Her 
daughter Jean is a medical technologist 
at the N. E. Deaconess Hospital, Boston, and 
son Ensign Roger Patterson is a naval aviator 
in the Pacific. Ann is a purchasing expeditor 
for Submarine Signal Co. 

Mary Erving Lindsay reports on her fam- 
ily: Jack is Capt. in the Marine Corps, 
aboard the giant carrier Essex in the Pacific 
battle zones with Vice- Admiral Mitscher's 
Task Force 58, in the Fifth Fleet. Walker 
T/Sgt. in 8th Air Force writes most cheer- 
fully from P.O.W. camp near Vienna where 
he has been interned since November 5, 
1943. Caryl Norma is at Fort Devens as a 
senior cadet nurse having completed her 
training at the Salem Hospital. 

Hertha Fletcher Field's husband is Sales 
Manager with the W.A.B.C. Columbia 
Broadcasting Systems in New York. Her son 



l 9 



John Field 3rd, is a photographer with the 
C.B.'s in the Navy. 

Edna Francis Levitt's only son Sgt. Charles 
W. Levitt of the 87th Mt. Inf. Reg. died of 
wounds received in action in Italy on Feb- 
ruary 2 1 st. He had served in the Aleutian 
Islands also. 

Address unknown: Charlotte Amsden 
Flint. 

1914 

Helen Burk Jones' daughter Susan is 
attending the Moravian Seminary in Beth- 
lehem, Pa., and son Meredith is in the U.S. 
Navy Hospital Corps. 

Frances Dowd Chittenden has a daughter 
at Smith, a son in high school, and a younger 
boy in the fifth grade. 

Katharine Selden McDuffie besides doing a 
notable job as head of the Red Cross Can- 
teen in Andover has two sons, Robert and 
Frederic in France, a third one "about to 
join something," and daughter Sally at 
Abbot. 

Hildegarde Gutterson Smith is in California 
this winter with Edith. 

Ella Stohn Getchell's daughter Hazel 
Marie was married on January 27 to Norman 
Bernard Euwold, now living in Redwood 
City, Cal. Douglas Jr. is Lt. and 1st Naviga- 
tor flying a C 54 out of Honolulu. 

1915 

Thirtieth Reunion 

1 91 5 has always flocked back to Reunion, 
and let us hope our 30th will be no exception 
and that despite all, for a brief interlude we 
may once more be "young and gay." 
Marion M. Brooks, 
Reunion Chairman 

134 Charles St. 
Boston 14, Mass. 

Elizabeth Allen Belknap writes, "With 
Allen twenty, a radio technician in the sub- 
marine service in the Pacific, and Dan 
eighteen in the Navy V- 1 2 at Cornell, we are 
very glad that we have Martha eight.' ' 

Marion Barnard Cole's son Donald who 
graduated from Phillips and Harvard is an 
Ensign serving in the Pacific in Amphibious 
landings. He was at Guam, Leyte and Luzon. 

Catherine Leach says there is "never a 
dull moment" in her job in the Press Bureau 
at Pinehurst, N. C. She supervizes inter- 
views and photography of notables from 



every profession, and attends all the social 
and sports events. 

Jessie Nye Blodgett hopes to attend re- 
union. Her daughter Sara has a son. Her son 
Frederic receives his degree in medicine and 
1 st Lt. Commission at Yale Medical School 
in June. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Eugene 
Bernardin (Mary Flynn), 11 Abbot St., 
Andover. 

1916 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. James E. 
Downs (Laura Cheever) , Andover. 

Eleanor Black Draffan's son Spencer, 
22 years old, is in the Navy, overseas. 
Marian 19, is in Ogontz School, James 15, 
in Western Reserve Academy, and Frances 
1 1 , is at home. 

Myrtle Dean Lewis's son Ensign S. Dean 
Lewis, is stationed at the David Taylor 
Model Basin, at Carderock, Md. 

Grace Merrill Emery's husband Com. 
George C. Emery, is Public Works Officer, 
and officer in Charge of construction at 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Helene Sands Brown has a daughter 13, 
and a son 16. She says, "My thanks to the 
Bulletin for my discovering that my first 
piano teacher Miss Ida Cushing '94, was an 
Abbot graduate ! 

Emma Stohn Larrabee's oldest daughter 
Marie is in Girl Scout work in Water town. 
Ralph is in USNR in the Amphibious service 
in an L.S.M. Janet is in high school, and 
attends Eugenia Parker's Camp, Blazing 
Trail, summers. 

Addresses unknown: Vera Allen; Mar- 
jorie Freeman Heck. 

1917 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Oliver D. 
Wescott (Dorothy Small), 84 Main St., 
Nantucket. 

Miriam Bacon Chellis' son Manning is in 
the Navy V-12 program at Harvard College. 
Carolyn graduates from Junior High in 
June. 

Bernice Bout well Parsons has just one 
twelve year old at home. Douglas is a senior at 
Tilton Academy, and Phil is in the Army, 
expects to enter medical school this summer. 
She gives one day a week at Lovell General 
Hospital at Fort Devens working in the Arts 
and Skills program. 

Cornelia Newcomb Lattin's son Frederic 
will graduate from U.S.C.G. Academy in 



20 



June. Her daughter Harriet Chapell is to 
enter Abbot in 1946. She says, "I only hope 
my mother, Harriet Chapell Newcomb '76, 
will be able to see the child as she develops 
in that grand old school." 

Address unknown: Harriet Murdoch 
Anderson. 

1918 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George J. 
Cutler (Velma Rowell), 45 Eliot St., Jamaica 
Plain. 

Helen Meigs van Dyck writes, "Our son's 
prep school experiences are bringing me 
many pleasant reminders of my own school 
life at Abbot. He's a senior at The Hill 
School. My newest venture is the hobby- 
business of raising very fine Cocker span- 
iels." 

Margaret Morris Clausen's son is in the 
first year of Medical School at Dartmouth 
under the Navy. Her daughter is a senior at 
Springside School in Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

Lois Lindsay has received a leave of ab- 
sence from the public school system of 
Amsterdam, N. Y. and has joined the staff 
oftheUSO. 

Katherine Pinckney Whistler's husband, 
Lt. Col. Whistler, is in the A.U.S. at present 
attached to the First Service Command 
in Boston. 

Address unknown: Louise Stillwell 
Stewart. 

1919 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Grace L. 
Boynton (Grace Leyser), 30 Engle St., Ten- 
any, N.J. 

Kathryn Beck Dow's daughter Constance 
is married, and living in Hawaii. Eleanor is 
graduating this June from Cambridge 
School in Weston. 

Grace Kepner Noble is "busy with home 
and church activities. We have a Teen age 
"Hang-out" in the Commercial building 
owned by the church and expect to spend 
many hours there. I blush to admit that two 
older daughters are at Emma Willard 
School, Charlie is instructor in Religion 
there, commuting from Syracuse to Troy 
each week.' ' 

Grace Leyser Boynton is working at Camp 
Shanks, N. Y. as Nurse's Aide, with wounded 
returned soldiers. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Norman D. 
Meader (Dorothy Shapleigh) a son, August 

i3 ? 1944- 
Address unknown : M. Gladys Merrill. 



1920 
Twenty-fifth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. William Kurth 

(Isabel Sutherland), No. Main St., Andover. 

Julia Abbe Goodwin and her husband are 
studying Russian, with the purpose of doing 
reconstruction work in Russia after the war. 

Hope Allen Bates sends her best wishes for 
the success of the reunion, and regrets she 
cannot be present. 

Betty Babb Foxwell's oldest son Marshall, 
is a member of the upper middle class at 
Phillips Academy. Her younger son, Richard 
hopes to enter as a junior this fall. 

Dorothy Fisher Whitaker plans to come to 
reunion, says, "It's been a long time since 
I've seen anyone. My husband returned on 
the last Gripsholm from the Far East, having 
been interned in Shanghai for a year. He's 
fine now and you can imagine how happy 
I am. Our only son, Tom, is with the 5th 
Marine Division and has been on Iwo all 
during that bloody affair. I'm busy at house- 
keeping and Red Cross at the Army hospital 
here, in Richmond, Va." 

Irene Franklin Foster's oldest son, Phillips, 
worked for nearly a year in a bomber plant, 
making B 29's. He is now a senior at Georgia 
Tech, is house manager of the Phi Gamma 
Delta House. Marjorie is a junior at Wheaton 
College, and the youngest son, John is a 
student at Junior High. 

Lillian Grumman writes, "Since January 
1943, I have been a defense worker in an 
airplane parts plant. It surely has been an 
experience which I will never regret, a real 
eye-opener. Thank you, Miss Hearsey, for 
your fine letter." 

Caroline Halliday Wilkinson's oldest son is 
overseas with the 9th Army. She goes once 
a week as a Dietitian's Aid to the Kennedy 
Hospital, in Memphis, Tenn. 

Kay Hamblet has taken the Nurses 's Aid 
course at the Lawrence General Hospital. 

Mildred Linscott Porter's husband starts 
soon his 1 5th year as Dean of Amherst Col- 
lege. She has two sons, John 17, is at Deer- 
field Academy, and Arthur 1 4 years old, is in 
high school in Amherst. 

Lydia McCreary Persons son, Ensign Sand- 
ford Persons, 22 years, is in the Philippines. 
Nancy, 19, is taking the assistant Engineer- 
ing course at Purdue University, with flying 
lessons on the side, and Helen 15, is in 
school (at home) in East Aurora, N. Y. 



21 



Paula Miller Patrick's husband is a Major 
with the SHAEF in Paris, G-5 for a while, 
now PRD. Three young fry keep her busy 
with life in general. 

Helen Polk Barker writes, "If I can ar- 
range my work and household I hope to be 
able to be on hand for the Commencement 
weekend. I am now back full time as Recrea- 
tional Director at Butler Hospital, in Provi- 
dence. It is my old stamping ground as I was 
in the occupational therapy department for 
eight years. Between the hospital activities, 
my home and demands of my young son of 
eight, I find I have little time to worry about 
trivialities." 

Lucy Pratt Rutherford sends an interesting 
account of her activities. "I have three 
children, Marjorie 21, who has just grad- 
uated from the University of Michigan, and 
is now working at the Hospital as a Medical 
Social worker. Lucy 20, is a junior at Michi- 
gan, and Scott Jr. 1 1 years, who is in the 6th 
grade. In order to keep the girls in college, 
as Scott wanted to get back into the Navy, I 
went to work at Nash-Kelvinator. We make 
propellers for the B-24's, B-17, Lancasters, 
Mosquito and many others. I am an in- 
spector on the ' 'coating line." 

My father died last October and I went 
east for a week, the only time I have missed 
from work. Do remember me to all the girls. 
I would so love to hear from them.' ' 

Helen Thiel Gravengaard has become a 
grandmother in the birth of a son to her son, 
Cpl. Philip L. Gravengaard, USAAF., on 
February 15. 

Helen Walker Parsons has a full time ad- 
ministrative job at the School for overseas 
administration at Harvard. She runs her 
home, three children and works for a local 
cooperative, in which she is interested. She 
expects to attend reunion. 

Lee Wicker sham Mills says, "My husband is 
the important member of the family as he is 
a Commodore U.S.N, and head of Fleet 
airships Atlantic. Of course I am happy 
to have Georgia Lee in Abbot. Hope to be 
at reunion." 

Ruth Winn Newhall writes, "Am looking 
forward to getting to the reunion this year. 
We hope our fourteen year old daughter 
Nancy, will be able to enter Abbot this fall. 
Besides Nancy, we have an eight year old 
daughter Patricia, born on St. Patrick's 
Day!" 

Bertha Worman Smith writes, "How I wish 



I could be at Abbot for our reunion, but 
war takes us so far from home. Galvin, Capt. 
in the Air Corps, has been at Wright Field 
for almost three years, and I have been with 
him." 

Margaret Worman doubts that she will be 
here for reunion, as she is doing home 
nursing. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Beverly R. 
Hubbard (Muriel Moxley), 172 Putnam 
Ave., Hamden 14, Conn. 

Addresses unknown: Jean Lyon Mc- 
Connell, Anna R. Hussey. 

1921 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. David H. 
Bigelow (Marion Kimball), 326 Highland 
St., West Newton. 

Margaret Ailing Ward writes, "My four 
year old daughter "Winkie" as she calls 
herself, sets a lively pace. Perhaps she will 
go to Abbot some day ! ' ' 

Helen Norpell Price says, "A family of four 
children all the way from twenty to five 
years of age keeps me on the jump. I am 
bending every effort to come back for my 
25th reunion in '46!" 

It's time to enter that daughter in Abbot 
for 1946! 

Dorothy Martin Buracker's husband, Capt. 
Buracker returned after fourteen months in 
the Pacific. "He was Capt. of the aircraft 
carrier Princeton which was sunk in October. 
We are now living in Washington and our 
two daughters, ten and twelve are busy see- 
ing all there is to see." 

Ruth Crossman Houg's daughter Eugenia 
is a freshman at Pomona College. Her son 
Orville is playing the clarinet with his high 
school band in a contest at the University 
of Southern California, where a state wide 
contest is being held. 

Harriet Edgell Bruce says, "After living 
with us four years our English Christopher 
has returned to his own family. We feel like 
a very small family with two children." 

Florence Hinckley Bishop is doing secre- 
tarial work at the American Embassy in 
London. Her husband is at their chalet in 
Switzerland. 

Frances Gasser Stover hopes her daughter 
Joan, 14, will soon go to Abbot. Her son is 
eleven years old. 

Carol Perrin Dunton writes, "Extracur- 



22 



ricula activity still along dramatic lines! 
Took part in the Naval Training Station 
production of 'Brother Rat'; have given the 
training for Dramatic Badge to a different 
Scout Troop each year for the past four 
years; and as President of the Little Theatre, 
plan shows for the service men in Newport." 

Since September 1941, Helen Roser has 
been Director of Nursing Education at the 
"Institute of Living" in Hartford, Conn. 

Agnes Titcomb Henderson writes, "We 
moved to York Harbor last May. We bought 
a house built from the most interesting parts 
of several old houses. It contains some of the 
loveliest old cupboards and panelling. We 
call the place "Henderson House," and have 
a gift shop in one section. I hope any Abbot 
girls who drive through York Harbor will 
stop and call. Our daughter is nineteen and 
will graduate from Colby College in June." 

Mary Williams Cochran's husband re- 
turned from China on the Gripsholm in 1942. 
At present he is working as assistant to Dr. 
Smith-Peterson in Boston. As soon as pos- 
sible they and their four children hope to 
return to China. 

Address unknown: Elizabeth McDou- 
gall Chandler. 

1922 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. Evans 
Kephart (Ruth Hill), 23 Lyme Rd., Hanover 
N. H. 

Olive Howard Vance writes of her family, 
"Our eldest son Gale has been overseas for 
over a year, and in France six months. The 
eldest daughter Carolyn is a junior at Sar- 
gent specializing in Physio-Therapy. The 
other two are in the ninth and eighth grades. 
Bill is very busy running two businesses. 
I've donated blood eleven times, and wish I 
could do a lot more war work. Elizabeth 
Hutchinson Graham '22, writes me about 
three times a year. Her family are fine and 
growing up rapidly. We hope to meet some- 
time in Boston." 

Send that new address to the Alumnae Office 
before September. Include postal district no. 

William J. Rahill husband of Cecilia 
Kunkel, died on July 11, 1 944 in Harris- 
burg, Pa. Cecilia has a son William J. 3rd, 
and two daughters, Geraldine and Mary 
Minster. 

Married: Margery Moon Pearson to Rob- 
ert Lindley Zeigfield, February 9. 



Eleanor Rose is "working day and night 
helping to take care of jobs of men who are 
serving Uncle Sam." 

Marian Rugg Caywood writes, "My twelve 
year old daughter Abby and I spend part 
of each winter visiting my mother and 
father at their Delray Beach, Florida, home. 
So I keep in fine shape for Red Cross, 
Symphony and War Chest Drive, and light 
housework which is always with us.' ' 

Anne Whinery says, "I have a friend here 
in Richmond, Va., who is a descendant of 
Madame Abbot and whose youngest is 
named Sarah Abbot Anderson. My work is 
with adoptions in the State Dept. of Public 
Welfare." 

1923 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Sterling Dow 
(Elizabeth Flagg), 36 Holden St., Cam- 
bridge. 

Elizabeth Flagg Dow's husband has re- 
sumed teaching of classics and Ancient 
History at Harvard, after a year of war 
work in Washington, and four months in 
Cairo. Her oldest child twelve and a-half 
is at Buckingham School, and the boy, 
eleven, is at Browne-Nichols School. She is 
her husband's secretary and is on some local 
committees. 

Eleanor Noyes Roedel writes, "In spite of 
the fact I haven't been back to Abbot for 
quite a few years I enjoy no end reading each 
and every item. Capt. Roedel has been in 
the army three years in September, is now 
at B.A.G.F. Georgia. Judith who is now 
seven goes to a Friends School here in Phila. 
We hope to send her to New England to 
school so she will know and love New Eng- 
land as I do." 

Think about Abbot for that daughter! 

Dolores Osborne Hall says, "Loved Miss 
Hearsey's letter. Jack, my son fourteen, who 
is a freshman in the Amesbury High School, 
was elected president of his class. He's a good 
athlete, and tops in his Mom's estimation." 

Natalie Page Neville's children are grow- 
ing up fast, the boy is twelve, and two girls 
are ten and five. 

Mary Catherine Swartwood Sinclaire's son 
Bill is a plebe at Culver Military Academy. 
Mary Carroll is a junior at Abbot "loving 
it,' ' and daughter Helen twelve, is in Junior 
High. 



23 



Addresses unknown: Elizabeth Max- 
well Killion, Estella Throckmorton Swenson, 
Raymah Wright Sutherland. 

1924 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. John 
Holden (Polly Bullard), Middlebury, Vt. 

Virgil DeWitt Harrington, father of 
Elizabeth (Mrs. James Wilson) 1924, and 
Jeanne (Mrs. Frederick Farr) 1930, died on 
January 16, 

Frances Williams MacCorkle has a second 
daughter Danna, born July 30, 1943. 

Katherine Hart Mitchell writes, "I just 
live from one mail to the next waiting for 
letters from my husband, Lt. Col. Mitchell, 
who is with Maj. Gen. Patton's third Army. 
He is the "G-2" of the Sixth Armored Div. 
which means he handles all the military in- 
telligence for the Div. Having no children to 
brag about, I have to brag about him. He 
was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for 
"meritorious achievement in line of duty." 
"He was sent into Brest to demand the sur- 
render of the garrison from the German 
paratroop Gen. Ramke, but the General said 
he would fight to the end. Glad I didn't 
know about it at the time." 

Addresses unknown: Dorothy D. 
Adams; Elizabeth Bragg Macintosh. 

1925 

Twentieth Reunion 

I expect to be in Andover for our 20th 
class reunion. I hope everyone who possibly 
can will try to come back for Alumnae Day. 
We plan to meet at Mrs. Chipman's for 
luncheon at 12 o'clock. I'll be looking for 
you! 

Evelyn McDougall Hay, 

Reunion Chairman 
Birch Knolls, Cape Cottage, Me. 

Eleanor Bodwell Pepion hopes to attend 
reunion. 

Margaret Daniells Burgess plans to be at 
reunion. She and her ten year old daughter 
Sheila, are enjoying a vacation in California. 

Charlotte Hanna Beveridge writes that 
nothing would be nicer than to see Andover 
in May, but house, family, live stock and 
odds and ends keep her busy at home. 

Lt. (jg) Frances Howard O'Brien is enjoy- 
ing her work in the U.S. Naval Hospital, at 
Astoria, Oregon, very much. 



Eunice Huntsman writes, ' ' Still am house- 
keeper for my family, with church work, 
music, and bowling for outside interests. 
Plan to attend reunion." 

Katherine Boyce Hepbron has two chil- 
dren, a girl "Boyce" 12, who may come to 
Abbot, and a son George T. 3rd 16, now at 
Blair Academy. 

Theodate Johnson hopes to be in Boston 
sometime this spring and will try to make 
reunion. She sends greetings to all the class- 
mates. 

Charlotte Kitchin Lyons is working for the 
Navy on Civil Service. She cannot come to 
reunion. 

Betty Lincoln Burr hopes to attend reunion, 
"help and gas being possible." She has three 
children, Betsey, Virginia and Lee 3rd. 

Hildegarde Mittendorff Seidel sends greet- 
ings to all the class. Her sister, Herta Mitten- 
dorff Fisher is moving to Boston in April, 
where her husband Lt. Fred Fisher is sta- 
tioned in the Ordnance Div. (Address 
please!) 

Betsey Righter Farrar writes, "Though I 
should love to look forward to nothing more 
than May 19, I doubt if I can make it. 
However one never knows!" 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George B. 
Beveridge (Charlotte Hanna), Sanfordtown 
Rd., Redding, Conn. 

Addresses unknown: Phyllis Yates 
Shields, Helen Sagendorph Mcintosh, Hild- 
red Sperry Raymond. 

1926 

Sylvea Shapleigh Smith has four children, 
Patricia, born September 1933; Stephen, 
born March 1937; Olea, born January 1943; 
Shapleigh, born May 1944. The Princeton 
University Press published a biography 
"The Life of Ole Bull," written by her hus- 
band, Mortimer B. Smith, a little over a 
year ago. 

Do you wish reservations for room and meals 
at Commencement? Write to Alumnae Office 
by next mail. 



1927 

Margaret Nay Gramkow has two girls, 
nine and six. She hopes they will both be 
able to come to Abbot! 

Lucy Sanborn has been working for the 
past year as a psychiatric social worker in 



24 



the Mental Hygiene Clinic of Lake County, 
Ind. 

Helen Connolly McGuire writes, "My 
husband, a Lieut, in the Coast Guard Re- 
serve is temporarily stationed in Boston, so 
we are living in Newburyport again, The 
children, Susan eight, Elizabeth six, and 
Frank Lewis five, are enjoying their visit 
greatly." 

Send that change of address before Sept.! 
to the Alumnae Office. Include postal 
district no. 

Dorothy French Gray says, "My four chil- 
dren and ten-room house, keep me very 
busy in these days of no help. Janet twelve, 
is almost ready for Abbot, Douglas Jr. nine, 
and Donny five, are both real boys and Ruth 
Ellen four, has to be a real torn boy to keep 
up with her brothers." 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Getz- 
man (Ruth Nason) a daughter Louise, in 
May 1944. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Kendrick Bellows 
(Sylvia Miller), a third child and second 
son, Timothy Parker, March 9. 

Caroline Ward Sanford says, "I was at 
Draper Homestead only a few months but 
do remember many of the girls and enjoy 
reading about them in the Bulletin. I have 
lived in Westfield eleven years and enjoy my 
family, daughter seven and son ten, Church, 
Red Cross and friends very much.' ' 

Addresses unknown: Helen Amesse; 
Margaret Creelman Nelson; Alice Stonebraker 
McLaughlin. 

1928 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Emily Sloper, 
36 Russell St., New Britain, Conn. 

Margaret Nivison Chase reports a second 
son, Robert Nivison Chase, born March 19, 
1944. She writes, "My husband Austin, has 
been in the Navy since February 1944. He 
has nearly completed his studies for radio 
technician and I expect will be on the 
bounding main very shortly. I find lots to do 
in Little Falls with two babies under three, 
weekly orchestra and choir rehearsals. I took 
up the cello five years ago and scrape away 
at Mozart and Beethoven to my heart's 
content. "We give three concerts a year. 
Best wishes to all '28ers." 

After a year and a-half of experience with 
the Visiting Nurse Service of New York 



Lois Dunn left to become a Research Assis- 
tant with the Committee on Public Health 
Relations of the New York Academy of 
Medicine. 

Florence Fitzhugh Phelps's husband is a 
Major stationed at the Philadelphia Signal 
Depot. She and her two sons, Jim ten, and 
Bob seven, are there with him. 

Beatrice Lane Mercer writes, "With a large 
home and four children to care for with no 
steady help I am kept pretty busy at home, 
but do work at the local hospital on Saturday 
afternoons. We were able to go to New York 
for five days rest and fun.' ' 

Nancy Sherman Craig, says, "California is 
certainly a long way from New England. I 
fully enjoy my Abbot Bulletin with all 
the news of the girls I knew. We have re- 
cently moved to a larger house to accommo- 
date our larger family, three children, Ted, 
twelve; Rodney, seven, and Julie two and 
a half years. Julie is named for my sister 
Julie Sherman Tibbetts, 1918. My husband 
left his position as Comptroller of Mills 
College a few years ago and is now General 
Manager of the American Brass and Copper 
Co., in Oakland." 

Addresses unknown: Constance Rund- 
lett Clarke; Elizabeth Whitney Binkley; Jean 
Frederick Rawlings. 

1929 

Louise Anthony Castor's husband is no 
longer in the A.U.S. Had a medical dis- 
charge, and is now back at his old job, the 
publishing business. 

Katherine Blunt Polsby is still Chairman 
of Volunteer Nurse's Aides for the Red 
Cross. Dan and Dick, four and six, take the 
rest of her time completely. 

Alice Butler Wright's husband is now in 
training for the infantry at Camp Blanding, 
Fla. She is staying in Norwood, N. Y. with 
her two sons. 

Send that new address to the Alumnae 
Office! 

Barbara Folk Howe is much interested in 
her volunteer job with the Lowell Red Cross, 
where she is a visitor in service men's fam- 
ilies. 

Polly Francis Loesch gives two mornings a 
week teaching "Dramatics as Treatment" 
in the Richmond Professional Institute, an 
extension of William and Mary College. She 



25 



writes, "I also teach History and Theory of 
Occupational Therapy and Rehabilitation 
throughout the year. One of my favorite 
reference books is "Hospital Libraries" by 
E. Kathleen Jones, Abbot 1889. Bob and 
Bill aged three have a new respect for a 
Mama who isn't under their feet twenty-four 
hours a day! My husband is still a Chaplain 
with the 9th Air Force, had been recently 
assigned to a Field Hospital." 

Constance Chamberlin Harris' husband is 
serving overseas, and she has returned home 
with her sixteen months old daughter for the 
duration. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Francis Holland 
(Barbara Holland), a second son, F. Graham 
Holland, January 28. 

Katharine Howell Whittum has a second 
child, Jeanne, born September 25, 1944. 
Allan is three and a half years old. 

Dorothy Field was discovered in Mexico 
City selling Borden Milk products. Susan 
Ripley '28, who is playing in an orchestra 
there wrote of their unexpected meeting. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd R. Yoh 
(Harriet Gilmore) a daughter Susan Roger, 
November 1 1 , 1 944. 

After three years silence Despina Plakias 
Messinesi has had direct word from her hus- 
band in Athens, Greece. She writes, "He 
says they are still alive, the Huns having 
lived in our house, then leaving with every- 
thing, even the garden pump. Now the 
house is occupied by British officers as a mess 
hall. It is surprising how material possessions 
over there have no interest for me.' ' 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Coburn R. 
Wheeler (Bettina Rollins) a second child, a 
daughter Sydney Anne, February 4. 

Millicent Smith Uppvall says, "I devour 
all Abbot news, our position in a school, 
*Eaglebrook,' keeps us from entering actively 
in much outside. Sorry I missed our 15th 
reunion." 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Jean Schwen- 
ninger (Polly Warden) a son, John Charles 
Parker, March 20, in Grenoble, France. 

Addresses unknown: Edith D. Smith; 
Grace E. Stephens; Emelyn Wright Rim- 
bach. 

1930 

Fifteenth Reunion 

Hello, everyone — Yes, this is it, our 
Fifteenth coming up, but soon, and by this 
time you've made big plans and here's 



hoping they all work out. For those of you 
who can't be with us the 19th of May, I have 
a brilliant thought. If each of you will write 
a letter (long and newsy) to be read at 
Reunion, I promise in return that you'll 
have a chance to read them too. Is it a 
bargain? Then sit right down and begin 
and send to me at once! Love to you all. 

Kathie Fellows Ingraham 
Reunion Chairman 
31 1 Conestoga Rd., 

Wayne, Pa. 

Donna Brace Latham says, "My children 
Jay six in June, and Danna Kay who was 
one in January keep me tied down, but they 
are well worth it! If I can't manage it for 
May 19, I'll hope to make it in the fall." 

Posy Castle Olivetti hopes to come east for 
reunion. 

Betty Dean Ballou keeps busy working as a 
"Grey Lady" in the Veterans Hospital in 
Northampton. 

Kathryn Dutton Leidy's husband Lt. Leidy 
has been in the Pacific for over a year. She 
and Rosanna, aged two and a half "keep" 
house together in Boyertown, Pa. "Best 
wishes for the best reunion.' ' 

Jane Goodell headed a clubmobile unit of 
thirty girls who landed in France a month 
after D day. She is now in New York work- 
ing for the Red Cross drive. 

Alma Hill plans to attend reunion, and 
bring with her Agnes Brown, a special 
student of '95. 

Grace Hadley is working in Jacksonville, 
Arkansas, in charge of recreation for a 
housing project near the Arkansas Ordnance 
Plant."All the fathers and mothers work 
at the plant, on different shifts. We have to 
keep an eye on the children especially the 
teen-agers, and try to entice the adults out 
after eight hours of work under tension. 
Best wishes to Abbot and the Class of '30, and 
send on more news, it's very welcome." 

Christine Hollands Struck regrets that she 
cannot come back from Rochester, N. Y. 
so early in May. "Will be there in Spirit." 

Barbara Lamson Cummings expects to be 
present at reunion. 

Barbara Lord Mathias as academic dean 
and lecturer in History at Western College, 
is unable to attend reunion. Her husband 
was seriously wounded in France, and has 
been brought back to this country for further 
hospitalization. 



26 



Mary McCaslin Giles has been teaching 
school, primary grades since 1933. Her 
husband is with the Army Medical Dept. 
stationed in New Guinea. 

Mary Jane Owsley Warwick is counting on 
being in Andover for the whole Commence- 
ment weekend. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Lewis 
(Elizabeth Perry) a son, Robert Perry, 
November 14, 1944. 

Edda Renouf Gould's husband is in the 
Army Medical Corps, in the Pacific since 
last spring. She is busy with two small 
children. 

Ensign Eleanor Ritchie regrets that she 
can't have leave at reunion time. 

Eleanor Royce Groff writes, ' ' I manage to 
see quite a bit of my ex-roommate Kit 
Ingram Rowe, despite the fact that she de- 
serted Princeton for Yale. And of course 
right here among the faculty we have Pattie 
Thompson Heely '19, wife of the head- 
master, and Betty shorn Bacon '29. My 
better half is Master of history and public 
speaking at Lawrenceville School. We have 
three children, Sallie 7, Edmund 5 and 
William 3 , nuff said ! ' ' 

Mary Shepard Wiley is coming to reunion 
if it is humanly possible. She considers 
learning to make bread her greatest accom- 
plishment this winter. 

Class Fund Chairman: Mrs. Jack R. War- 
wick (Mary Jane Owlsey), 26 Ledgewood 
Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Addresses unknown; Evelyn E. Ham- 
ilton. Gay Chamberlain Southwick. 

1931 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Francis Hol- 
land (Barbara Graham), 218 West Marion 
St., South Bend, Ind. 

Doris Allen Carroll has two children, 
daughter Deane, five, and Edward, one year 
old. 

Send your reservations for rooms and meals 
at Commencement by next mail, to Alumnae 
Office. 

Ruth Cann Baker reports that Marjorie 
Ruth, twelve, is in Junior High, and Susan, 
four, is growing fast. She is busy with P.T.A., 
and Red Cross, but says, "My jobs seem to 
run to Corresponding Secretary of every 
club I join!" 



Edith Keller is still stationed at Camp 
Blanding, Fla. She was sent to Surgical 
Technician's School at Atterbury, Ind., for a 
course of study. 

Janet Simon Smith's husband is an Ensign 
with amphibious forces in the Pacific. She 
is at home with her two children, Holiday, 
seven, and Bobbie, two and a half. 

Marian Stewart Hutt's husband is a 1st Lt., 
serving in Southern France as Public Rela- 
tions Officer, has been overseas two years. 
Her son Jeremy, was born September 16, 
1 941. 

Lisette Micoleau Tillinghast has now three 
daughters, and one son. Charles in, eight; 
Betsy, five; Jane, three; and Anne Shaw, 
born February 20. Her husband is doing 
legal work for the Bendix Aviation Corp. 

Florence Norton is working in a lawyer's 
office in Skowhegan, Maine, and her sister 
Bertha '33 is keeping house. They are busy 
looking after the rents their father had in 
town. 

Addresses unknown: Virginia Lillard 
Collins; Pauline Rogers Moreen; Nanine 
Wheeler; Marie Whitehill. 

Send that new address to the Alumnae 
Office! 



1932 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Dorothy Rich- 
ardson, Boston Rd., Billerica, Mass. 

Ann Adams Wallace's husband Cpl. Jack 
Wallace, has been overseas for one and 
a half years. She is living with her parents, 
and keeps busy in Red Cross, and "becom- 
ing a personal friend of the postman.' ' 

Elizabeth Bigler de Masi writes, "Hi, Class 
of '32 ! How about some news from some of 
you. I read the Bulletin from cover to 
cover, what are all the class doing? I keep 
busy with my family of three, Jean 9; Jim- 
mie 7; and John 5^. My husband is a plant 
Engineer with the Chesepeake & Potomac 
Telephone Co. of Washington." 

Engaged: Elizabeth Holihan to Lt. John 
F. Giblin, USNR. 

Married: Cynthia James to Major John 
E. Lovelock, March 26, at St. Peter's Church 
in London's West End. Major Lovelock is 
with the British Army Medical Corps. 
Cynthia has been in London since 1941 
with the American Hospital and the Office 
of Strategic Services. 



27 



Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Stanley D. Mercer 
(Elizabeth Ann Palmer), a daughter Bar- 
bara Joan, April 3, 1944. 

Mary Thompson Sherman finds her seven- 
teen months old daughter, Nancy, a great 
antidote to the war. Mary has two brothers, 
and three brothers-in-law all in the Pacific. 

Judy Wilhlmi Dodane's husband is on 
submarine duty in the Pacific. She is living 
with her parents, and "teaching Social 
Studies in a challenging Junior high school 
in San Francisco." 

Addresses unknown: Dorothy Moore; 
Elizabeth Piper Thornton; Phyllis Frederick. 

1933 

Margaret Black Manz writes, "I'm back 
in Mansfield, Ohio, teaching school again. 
My husband has been in England since 
June, and will be there for quite a while to 
come. I've taken an apartment and feel a 
bit settled after three years of army camps. 
Olive French Sherman has moved here. I'm 
to have her oldest boy in school. We're 
planning Abbot round-ups and lots of fun." 

Lois Chapman Greene was dietitian at a 
boy's camp last summer, taking her seven 
year old son with her. She hopes to do the 
same thing this year. 

Peg Chase Johnson's husband, Capt. in the 
Marine Corps, went overseas last November. 
She has been in Detroit working on the Staff 
of the University of Michigan extension 
service. Her specific projects are in the field 
of Home and Family living. After June 30, 
her address will be 1 1 Woodbridge Place, 
State Island 2, N. Y. 

Jane Burnham Curry reports a daughter 
Barbara Burnham born on August 16, 1943. 

Helen Rice Wiles has a second daughter 
Beverly Joan, born May 11, 1943. 

Olive French Sherman has moved to Mans- 
field, Ohio, where her husband, Lt. (jg), is 
doing Contract Termination work. The 
Navy calls it a permanent assignment. Her 
three children are Rollie Jr. nine years; Ann, 
six; and Leon, one year old. 

Alice Hill Turner is back in Larchmont, 
N. Y. She has a daughter Karen three, and 
Sandra a year old. 

Georgiana Smith is working in the public 
schools in Detroit in the field of children's 
literature, and also is teaching an Extension 
Course. 

Jean Vernon Black has two children. 

Barbara Worth Brown, with her son, has 



gone to California to spend several months 
with her husband, Lt. Com. in the Naval 
Reserve. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Duffey 
(Dorothy Wrenn) their third child and sec- 
ond son, Robert Wrenn, December 22, 1944. 

Address unknown: Marcia Gaylord 
Norman. 

1934 

Elizabeth Flanders Cleveland has two girls, 
Helen Hoyt, born December 12, 1939, and 
Marian van Buren, born July 12, 1943. 
Betty paints pastel portraits and has the 
"knack" of catching a likeness. Her husband 
has done important work in Washington for 
the War Production Board and The Foreign 
Economic Administration. 

Peggy Estes Ballantine and her son 
Charles, is spending some months with her 
grandmother, Mrs. L. O. Lee, at 103 Han- 
cock St., Auburndale. Her husband is over- 
seas. She hopes her father, Prof. Charles 
Estes of Istanbul, may be able to come home 
this summer. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Richard O. Post 
(Jane Forte) a son, Richard Oliver Jr., 
March 9. Mr. Post is on active duty in the 
South Pacific. 

Born: To Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Wilkins 
(Peggy Morrill) a second daughter, Mary 
Gayden, February 12. Margaret is two years 
old. 

Commencement program on page 6. 

1935 
Tenth Reunion 

It is hard to believe we have reached the 
age of tenth reunions which looked so 
ancient to us in 1935, but here we are! Hope 
everyone will make a real effort to come to 
reunion so there will be a large group 
present. 

Barbara Chamberlain MacCready, 
Reunion Chairman 

421 W. DeSoto St., 

Pensacola, Fla. 

Doris Anderson Clark" followed the army" 
for two years after her marriage, now her 
husband, 1st Lt. Whittredge Clark is in 
France, and she is a claims investigator for 
the Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. in Law- 
rence. 

Marjory Brodie is working in the Employ- 



28 



merit and Personnel Section, Industrial 
Relations Department, of Canadian In- 
dustries Limited, Montreal. She is also active 
in the Junior League of Montreal. 

Barbara Chamberlain MacCready reports 
on her career, "After graduating from 
Smith in 1 939 and Katharine Gibbs in 1 940, 
worked at F. S. Moseley & Co., and later 
Harvard Medical School as a secretary. In 
October 1942 was married to Lt. Harry L. 
MacCready, stationed in Newfoundland. 
In December 1 943 he returned from duty in 
England and we have been living in Pen- 
sacola, Fla., ever since. 

Laura Chedel Miller has two sons, three 
years, and seven months old. Her husband 
is stationed at O'Reilly General Hospital, 
Springfield, Mo. 

Claire Cregg Derby taught French and 
English in the Methuen High School, and 
in October 1942, married Joseph F. Derby 
Jr. She reports an eight months old daughter 
Suzanne. At present her husband is overseas. 

Evelyn Chappell Swayze's husband is an 
Armed Guard Officer, on active duty in the 
Pacific. She has two children, Lynn Chap- 
pell, born April 3, 1943, and Joseph C. Jr., 
born August 2, 1944. 

Ann Cutler Squier and her husband are 
with American Airlines, in Phoenix, Ariz., 
"impatiently awaiting the end of the war so 
Bill and I can leave our essential jobs. I 
expedite for Goodyear Aircraft. We bought a 
ranch in northern Arizona, twenty miles 
from Springerville. 

Jane Dawes McClennan says, "My hus- 
band is now stationed at Warner Robins 
airfield, Georgia, where he is a captain 
in the Signal Corps. Daughter Joanne, born 
September 17, 1944, and I are with him. 
Any one down this way?" 

Phyllis Harding Morton writes, "After 
Connecticut College I spent my summer 
vacations in Europe, studied at the Univer- 
sity of Perugia in Italy. Returning to the 
U.S. when war broke out went to work for 
Wm. Filene's Sons Co., where I am now a 
buyer. In April 1943 I flew to Reno and 
married Lt. W. Heywood Morton. He was 
sent overseas, and I returned to Boston. At 
the moment I am spending my time, after 
work, at the Cushing Hospital, Framingham, 
where my husband has been a patient since 
last August. He was wounded at Saipan." 

Eleanor Johnson Dutoit is living in An- 
dover for the duration with her two daugh- 



ters, Susan three, and Ellen seven months 
old. Her husband is in France with the 
134th Evacuation Hospital, serving as a 
medical officer. 

Patricia Noonan Boyan's husband has just 
been released from the Army after seventeen 
months service, and they with a five and 
half year old son, are moving to Colorado 
where his business will take him. 

Lucia Nunez Mason writes, ' 'After gradua- 
tion from Smith I had a wonderful six weeks 
in Europe, then went to Simmons College 
where in 1941 I emerged with an M.S. 
from the school of Social Work. Then to 
New Haven for a job as case worker with the 
Family Society. In March 1942 I married 
Thomas C. Mason, Yale Law School. He is 
now a Capt. in A.U.S., now in Germany in 
the 3rd Army. I am in Andover with my 
family, enjoying our son, Thomas C. Jr., 
born February 7." 

Claire Oppenheim Marum's husband is 
overseas in the E.T.O., with a civil affairs 
outfit. Her son, Andrew William was born 
in June 1943. 

Cecile Van Peursem Lane says, "How I 
would love to be able to go back to Abbot 
for our 10th reunion, but I'm afraid it's out 
of the question. But I'd like to send my 
greetings to all those who can make it and 
perhaps I shall see some of '35 at the N. Y. 
Abbot Club luncheon, on April 14. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. William Dinkel 
(Carol Prudden) a son, James Danforth, 
February 25. 

Ellen Rivinius Hill plans to attend the class 
reunion. 

Margit Thony is employed as Secretary 
to the Departments of History, Sociology and 
Anthropology, at Hunter College, New 
York City. 

Mary Dee Wickenden Scofield has two 
daughters, Barbara Ann, born April 5, 1941, 
and Sally Dee, born September 2, 1942. 

Shirley Smith King says, "My son Stoddon 
(Tod for short) is two and a half years old 
now and provides most of our amusement. 
I enjoy the Bulletin so much but wish 
more '35'ers would write in." 

1936 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Elbridge H. Pres- 
ton (Miriam Adams) a second daughter, 
Susan, February 18. Lt. Preston is in the 
Marine Corps attached to the airforce as a 
ground officer, is now overseas, and Miriam 



29 



is living in Derry Village, N. H. for the dura- 
tion. 

Address unknown: Patricia Smith 
McGee. 

1937 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur W. 
Tucker (Martha Elizabeth Ransom), 632 
Great Plain Rd., Needham, Mass. 

Engaged: Patricia Burdine to John Han- 
cock Notman. 

Cynthia Holbrook Sumner is living at Sea 
Island, Ga., while her husband is at the Air 
Station at Glynco. He was formerly on duty 
for thirteen months in South America. 

Send that new address to the Alumnae Office! 

Jeannette Partridge is an assistant art 
Supervisor in the public school in Bristol, 
Conn., while waiting for her fiance to return 
from Italy. 

Jane Stevenson Wursch's husband is in Eng- 
land working in a General Hospital. She 
lives in Detroit with her two children, Dick 
and Anne. Recently she visited Anne Sawyer 
Williams and her two little boys in Glendale, 
Ohio. 

Born: To Major and Mrs. Howard W. 
Read (Martha Sweeney) a daughter, 
Carolyn Rutter, February 15. 

Addresses unknown: Louise Stevenson 
Anderson; Mildred Collens. 

1938 

Married: Jean Appleby to Levis Wain 
Minford 1 1 1 , December 8, 1 944, in New 
York City. 

Beverly Bridge Moore is living in Salina, 
Kansas, while her husband is a navigator on 
a B-29. Her daughter was born July 15, 1944. 

Elise Duncan is a staff artist in the Bureau 
of Human Nutrition and Home Economics, 
Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C. She does illustrations and covers etc. 

Sue Anne Eveleigh McVie and her Capt. 
husband have been for eighteen months in 
San Francisco. She says, "I have a feeling 
our days are numbered, but we've been 
luckier than most.' ' 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. William R. 
Leathers (Anne Flaherty) a son, William 
Randolph Jr., February 16. 

Word has come from Catherine Flaherty 
of the death of her brother Pfc. Edmund M. 
Flaherty Jr., killed in action in France, 
October 29, 1944. 



Born: To Lt. Com. and Mrs. Harry 
Helfrich (Diana Greene) a daughter. 
Diana's mother, Mrs. William M. Greene, 
died on March 16, in Baltimore. 

Rosa Fletcher has been a hospital worker 
with the Red Cross for almost a year. She 
is now in a brand new McGuire General 
Hospital in Richmond, Va., doing recrea- 
tional work. The hospital specializes in 
orthopedic and neuro-surgery. 

Capt. Williams, husband of Norma 
Forsyth Williams is with the 7th Army in 
France. Her father, Lt. Forsyth is in the 
South Pacific. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Fred V. Archer 
Jr. (Marian Lawson) their third son, Paul 
Thorbjorn, February 15. 

Betty McBride Chapman writes, "I am still 
with Mother here in Savannah while my 
husband Lt. Col. Jack Chapman is overseas. 
He has been across for two years, has been 
all over North Africa, Italy, Corsica and 
France. At present he is on Lt. Gen. Dever's 
6th Army Group staff in France. He was 
recently awarded the "Legion of Merit" 
medal. He is doing some very interesting 
work in close cooperation with the French 
forces in his group. I keep busy as a supervisor 
in the Red Cross surgical dressing rooms, 
doing C.D.V.O. work for the Junior League, 
and taking the Red Cross Canteen course." 

Margaret Plunkett Smith is busy with her 
small son Ormonde Jr., called "Kip". She 
does nurse's aide, and takes piano lessons on 
the side. 

Born: To Capt. and Mrs. John A. B. Faggi 
(Jeanne Sawyer) a son, John Alexander 
Butler Jr., February 24. Capt. Faggi has 
returned home from action in Germany. 

Born: To Ensign and Mrs. Charles R. 
Moxley Jr. (Jane Vogt) a daughter Kather- 
ine Elizabeth, January 1 . While her husband 
is in Pearl Harbor, Jane is at home in Bing- 
hampton, N. Y. 

Capt. Madeleine Proctor has left for over- 
seas duty with the Air Transport Command. 
Her brother Pfc. Edward Proctor is serving 
with the 7th Army in Germany. 

Muriel Wood graduated from Vassar in 
December, and is now doing Nursery School 
and Y.W.C.A. work in Pasadena, Cal. She 
is planning to start study for her M.A. in 
Philosophy, at Harvard in September. 

Addresses unknown: Constance Ab- 
bott; Nancy For man Hall; Louise Freeman 
Clough. 



30 



1939 

Olive Butler is working as office nurse for 
Dr. William Thompson, school physician at 
Abbot. 

Kay Harris writes of her life in Cam- 
bridge, "Cambridge is one of those places 
that is unwillingly a crossing-point for a lot 
of people. I've been lucky, though four 
flights up in a non-elevator apartment I have 
seen or heard from Mary Howard, Lucia 
Buchanan, Sally Peck and Mary Woodman. 
I could never leave out a chance to tell 
everyone about that hilarious year Kiki 
Skinner Mills and I shared an apartment and 
gave a wedding reception and exhaustive 
suppers." 

Born: To Capt. and Mrs. Oswald Tower 
Jr. (Eleanor Daniels), a son, March 14, in 
Glendale, Cal. 

Virginia Halstead Lightfoot's husband is 
now in Germany with the First Army. She 
was with him in Colorado Springs for two 
months before he left. 

Barbara Leland is working in a private 
nursery school, and expects to be at the 
Ogantz Camp for her ninth year. 

The Alumnae Office pleads for that new 
address! 

Dorothy Heidrich writes, "I would like 
very much to have any of our class who 
might wander out "Frisco" way during the 
war, get in touch with me. I am still sta- 
tioned at the Naval Hospital, Shoemaker, 
Cal. Unit 3, WAVE Quarters. It's been ages 
since I have seen anyone from our class." 

Frances Cross has graduated from the 
New York Hospital, Cornell University 
School of Nursing, and plans to enter the 
Navy Nurse Corps soon. 

For the past year Ann Oakman has been 
executive secretary for Moss Hart in New 
York, and recently has persuaded Sue Long 
Kremer to be her assistant! She says, "don't 
mind taking trips with "Dear Ruth" either, 
such as flying to Norfolk in a Navy bomber.' ' 

1940 
Fifth Reunion 

We've had a marvelous response so far for 
Fifth Reunion, so be sure and come if you 
can. It'll be pretty exciting, and a lot of fun 
to see what's happened to everyone and also 



what's happened to Abbot. Lots of changes 

all around. Please plan on it. 

Jeanne Cowles Wilson, 
Reunion Chairman 
3 Poplar St., Boston, Mass. 

Married: Marie Bertram to Capt. Paul B. 
Vander Pheynst, November 25, 1944, in 
Montclair, N. J. Marie is anticipating her 
fifth reunion and wishes "the entire class 
might be there." 

Carolyn Bittner is teaching the four-year 
old group in kindergarten at the Beaver 
Country Day School. She expects to attend 
reunion. 

Barbara Brown McKallagat writes, "I'm 
living in N. J. just outside Atlantic City 
where my husband is stationed. I doubt 
if I can make reunion because I have two 
sons, Peter, almost two, and Danny five 
months. Needless to say they keep me busy 
and tied down." 

Sue Chad wick is "definitely planning to be 
back for reunion, bar all accidents or mis- 
haps. After five years there will certainly 
be a lot of news to catch up with." 

Frances Chandler hopes to be at reunion, 
"if I am still sane as I am to be married the 
first part of June." 

Phyllis Crocker expects to enter the 
WAVES soon, and that will prevent her 
from coming to reunion. 

Connie Cross graduates in June from 
M.I.T. as a Textile Technologist. 

Elaine Dalrymple Borowski is at home 
again as her husband has gone overseas. 

Married: Charlotte Downey to Pfc. Frank 
John Boutin, July 1, 1944. He is a senior at 
the Stanford University Medical School, and 
Charlotte is doing secretarial work in the 
Pathology Dept. of the Hospital. They are 
living in San Francisco. 

Nancy Harrison hopes that she will suc- 
ceed in getting time off from her duties at 
Children's Hospital, so she can attend 
reunion. 

Sgt. Marguerite Hall has been with the 
same outfit for two years. At present she is at 
Headquarters of USMC in Washington 
working for the Casualty Division. She 
wishes she could have a furlough at reunion 
time. 

Mary Howard plans to be back for re- 
union, has been looking forward to it for 
some time. 

Marietta Meyer is deep in wedding plans 



3 1 



for early June in Minnesota, so doubts if she 
will be present. 

Jean Moir writes, "I'm working at the 
Vick Chemical Co. (with Pat Ettele) where 
we're both struggling to become secretaries. 
I hope you all have a grand time." 

Ruth Poore expects to be present for the 
reunion. 

Anne Schoepflin Ryder says, " I'll come up for 
reunion unless Charles gets sent somewhere 
else by then. He has been in the Navy since 
May. "Chuck" will be two in June, has red 
hair, brown eyes and is active. Five years is 
an awfully long time, I probably won't know 
anyone!" 

Ellen Spear fears her final exams at 
Wheaton will prevent her getting to Andover. 

Nancy Wilson Ainslie is teaching first 
grade in Dedham while her husband is in 
medical school. She will be at reunion. 

Bettie Weaver Hockmeyer's husband has 
gone to the Pacific where he is a Navy 
Fighter pilot. She is at home and anticipates 
reunion. 

Marcia Wheeler Falconer is working in her 
father's office since her husband went to 
England in the 8th Air Force. She hopes to 
see a lot of 1 940 at the reunion. 

Married: Priscilla Williams to Alan Lloyd 
Dorian, March 31, in Brockton. Her class- 
mate, Carolyn Bittner was her maid of honor. 

Winifred Wiglesworth Ph.M 3/c is at the 
U.S. Naval Hospital Bks. 845, Bainbridge. 
Sends her "Hello" to everyone. 

Danna Whitlock deBragga hopes to follow 
her husband to California in May, if not she 
may be at reunion. 

Jane Wilson Bolter is counting on reunion. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Carl H. Bolter 
(Jane Wilson), Apt. 12, 361 Harvard St., 
Cambridge. 

1941 

Mary Martin expects to graduate from 
Converse College this year. 

Following her graduation from Smith in 
May, Eleanor Rafton plans to enter the 
School for Social Service Administration at 
Chicago University. She hopes to prepare 
herself for service as a social psychiatric 
case worker in government rehabilitation 
work. 

Edith L. White was awarded an A.B. 
degree in Psychology at Brown University's 
winter Commencement. 

Married: Adeline Waterhouse to Philip 



MacKay 3rd, February 24, at Cranford, 
N. J. Emily Mills '41, was one of her at- 
tendants. 

Address unknown : Mary Purcell Wilson. 



1942 

Married: Suzanne Bates to Lt. (jg) Dar- 
win Whitcomb Heath, USNR, at New Lon- 
don, Conn., on January 27. 

Jane Bishop has been elected president oi 
Student Government at Hollins College for 
her senior year. 

Married: Elizabeth Fowler to Wilbur 
Sheridan Warrick, USAF, March 24, in 
Norwood. Barbara Hill '42, was maid of 
honor, and Thirsa Sands and Marilyn Men- 
shik Westaway, all classmates, were brides- 
maids. 

Bette Gorsuch has been working in the 
Cleveland Playhouse since February, getting 
the kind of experience she couldn't get in 
New York. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Edwin R. Decker 
(Margaret Goodman) a daughter, Kathryn 
Carney, March 22. Lt. Decker is serving in 
the Pacific. 

Betty Hardy Verdery has moved eight 
times since her marriage in July, but expects 
now to be in Pensacola, Fla. for eleven 
months, while her husband has further in- 
struction in piloting. He has changed from 
blimps to planes! She anticipates having her 
mother and father visit her this summer. 

Barbara Hill is studying in Medill School 
of Journalism at Northeastern University. 
She has been initiated into Kappa Alpha 
Theta Fraternity. 

Janice Lenane is doing confidential work 
for the Army in the Climatic, Research 
laboratory, Statistical Dept., in Lawrence. 
All clothing for infantry to use in cold or 
jungle climates is tested in special cham- 
bers. 

Married: Jean McKay to Ensign Franklin 
Cleveland, USNR, March 10, in Beverly. 

Marilyn Menshik Westaway is at home 
with her family in New York, as her husband 
is in Italy with the 15th Air Force. She says, 
"Can't tell you how much I enjoy the 
Bulletin." 

Engaged: Theodora Manning to Ensign 
Maurice Alexander, Supply Corps, USNR. 
Theo has transferred from Wheaton to 



32 



Barnard College for her junior and senior 
years. 

Addresses unknown: Helen Estin; 
Emma Ann Todd. 

1943 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Marion Bur- 
dine, Hollins College, Virginia. 

Apology. The Editor herewith makes her 
humble apology to Marion Burdine, for her 
grave error in crediting Pat's engagement, 
elsewhere announced, to Marion. 

Barbara Ohnick (aff. '43), has sent the 
joyful news that her parents were among the 
American internees released from Santo 
Tomas, in the Philippines. She is a junior 
at the University of Washington at Seattle, 
Wash. 

Anne Pearson graduated from the Hos- 
pital Corps School in Bethesda, Md., and 
is now working on the wards at The Phil- 
adelphia Naval Hospital as a Hospital 
Apprentice 1st class. This training preceeds 
that of the Pharmacist Mate rating. 

1944 

First Reunion 

Hi everyone! Doesn't seem possible that 
our freshman year at college is nearly over. 
I hope that all of you are enjoying this year, 
but most of all I hope that we'll be together 
for our first reunion at Abbot. Let's all try 
to be there with the red and white flying 

a § am - Molly Hubbard, 

Reunion Chairman 
Lake Erie College, Painesville, Ohio 

The following girls definitely plan to 
attend reunion on May 19. Aagot Hinrich- 
sen, Ruth Lyons, Alma Mastrangelo, Eva 
Persson, Elizabeth Rich and Charlotte Trow. 
Nancy Baylor writes of her initiation into 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, at the University of 
Nebraska. Betty Bertucio starts her training 
in Albany Medical School at Russell Sage 
College on May 19. She has been elected 
president of Kellas House. Ann Cadmus is 
pledged to Kappa Kappa Gamma at Mid- 
dlebury. Elizabeth Frank plans to transfer 
to Simmons College next fall. Nancy Em- 
erson will v sit at Abbot Birthday, May 5. 




Miss Friskin and Miss Hearsey welcome 
Alvah Houston 



Virginia Heidenkamp says college is won- 
derful. 

Alvah Houston, now on the road with the 
cast of "One Touch of Venus," gave a de- 
lightful impromptu recital at Abbot early 
one afternoon recently. 

Charlotte Leland plans to train for the 
Nurse's Aid Corps this summer. Nancy 
Nichols has pledged Kappa Kappa Gamma 
at Cornell. 

Nancy Palmer (aff. '44), expects to enter 
the University of Mexico in June. She has 
been attending the Latin American Institute 
in New York. She received "a letter from 
Margaret Sime '42, who is lecturing and 
working on the destruction of rats and mice.' ' 

Carol Paradise is planning to spend the 
summer in Mexico with the "Experiment in 
International Living." 

Eva Persson has joined the Radio and 
Spanish Clubs at Radcliffe. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Nancy Mc- 
Ivor, Cushing House, Smith College, 
Northampton, Mass. 



33 



BOSTON-ANDOVER TRAIN SERVICE 



FROM NORTH STATION, BOSTON 



DAILY 



Lv. Bost. 7.55 AM Ar. And. 8.45 AM 



10.15 

11.00 " 
1 2 . 30 PM 

*i.25 " 

2.30 " 
4.00 

4.27 " 

5-H " 

15-32 " 

5-54 " 

7.00 " 

7.50 " 

8.40 " 

9.50 " 
10.35 

11-55 " 



10.58 " 
11. 51 " 
1. 14 PM 
2.08 " 

3-o 3 " 
4.28 " 
5.16 " 

5-45 " 
6.19 " 

6.31 " 

7-47 
8.34 

9.28 

10.43 

11 .21 

12.44 



Lv. And. 7.25 AM Ar. Bost. 

8.09 

8.43 

9.14 

9.44 

10.35 
11. 19 
12.05 PM 
12.32 " 



5 » 



5 J 
5 5 
5 J 
) > 
5 5 



2. 12 
3-30 

4-43 
5-37 
7-i3 
8.32 
10.37 



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5 5 



* Saturday only | Friday only 



7.59 AM 

8.40 " 

9-3^ " 

9.55 " 
10.13 " 

11.03 

12.02 PM 

12.46 " 

1. 15 " 

2.56 " 

4.14 " 

5.19 " 

6.23 " 

8.05 " 
9.20 
11 .22 



j 5 









SUNDAYS 






Lv. Bost. 


8.00 AM 


Ar. 


And. 8.45 AM Lv. And. 


7.01 AM 


Ar. Bost. 7 . 53 AM 




10.30 " 




" 11. 18 " " " 


9.16 " 


1 . 00 " 




2 . 00 PM 




2.43 PM 


1 2 . 20 PM 


" " 1.06 PM 




3-30 




4. 14 " 


2.36 " 


3.20 




5.10 " 




5-47 " 


3-56 


4.41 




7-35 




8.25 " 


6.25 


7-i3 




8.45 




9-35 


9.22 " 


10.10 " 




11.30 




12.21 " 


9.58 " 


10.50 " 



34 




WORD SPOKEN IN DUE SEASON, 

HOW GOOD IS IT! 

Proverbs 



Name Glass 

Address Postal District Number 

Write news about yourself and others for the October Bulletin. Tear out 
and mail before September 15, to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, 
Andover, Mass. 

35 



Endowment 



"What a noble enterprise it would be if some philanthropist or someone 
else interested in this century-tested school could or would provide us with a 
substantial endowment for the finest teaching staff a school doing our type 
of work could have, and with future salaries quite ahead of any competitor." 



Conditional Gifts 



Abbot receives conditional gifts subject to annuity agreement with the 
donors. In this way any part of one's property can be applied to Abbot's 
welfare after death, and while living an assured income is received. 

Would you like to consult the Treasurer about an Annuity arrangement? 

Burton S. Flagg, Treasurer 



Form of Bequest 



I give to the Trustees of Abbot Academy, incorporated under the laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of dollars. 



36 






Abbot Araopmg UnUrttn 




<^^^^^^^^^^w^^SBHBB^mMB^^B^ ^SI K I3SI IIK u 



. ._. _ 







(frtnher, 1345 




Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of American Alumni Council 



OFFICERS, 1 944- 1 946 



President 

Mrs. Rolfe M. Kennedy 
(Roberta Kendall) 
Douglaston, N. Y. 

Vice-presidents 

Mrs. Frank C. d'Elseaux 

(Virginia Gay) 
Winchester, Mass. 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
Andover, Mass. 

Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



Clerk 
Mrs. Edwin H. Goodwin 
(Susan Hildreth) 
Winchester, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. James E. Downs 
(Laura Cheever) 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 
Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 
Miss Marion R. McPherson 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 

m 2 - T 94 8 I 945' I 95 1 

Miss Margaret Van Voorhis Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 

304 Lexington Ave. (Helen Allen) 

New York City, New York 246 Glen Rd. 

Weston 93, Mass. 

ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



Boston 

Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield] 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Chicago 

Mrs. J. Allen Lind 

(Mary Simpson) 
1 239 Asbury Ave. 
Winnetka, Illinois 

Connecticut 

Miss Sara G. Peck 
20 Fairview Terrace 
Derby, Conn. 

Detroit 

Mrs. Thomas A. Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
1 2 1 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Michigan 

Maine, Eastern 

Miss Eleanor Bird 
250 Broadway 
Rockland, Maine 



Maine, Western 
Mrs. Harold Robinson 
(Harriette Woolverton) 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

New York 
Miss Gertrude Holbrook 
Larchmont. N. Y. 

Ohio, Central 
Mrs. Paul Meek 
(Louise Norpell) 
Worthington, Ohio 

Ohio, Cleveland 
Mrs. George Worthington 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 

Old Colony 
Mrs. Richard M. Thompson 
(Ruth Niles) 
300 Woodlawn St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Pittsburgh 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
515 No. McKean St. 
Butler, Pa. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Series 13 OCTOBER, 1945 Issue i 



Table of Contents 

Frontispiece: Abbot Academy Faculty P a & e 

Miss Hearsey's Greeting 3 

Faculty Changes 5 

The World Is Ours Holly Welles ig^ 8 

Honor A's 10 

An Open Door 11 

Alumnae Relatives in Class of 1945 12 

Fall Calendar 14 

Our New Alumna Trustee 15 

New Alumnae Relatives 15 

Class Reunion Photographs 16 

Abbot Clubs 19 

Gifts to Abbot 19 

Alumnae Association .20 

In Memoriam 21 

Class News 22 

♦ 

THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

JANE B. CARPENTER, 1892, honorary 

CONSTANCE PARKER CHIPMAN, 1906, Editor in Chief 

marion r. Mcpherson, 191 8 

ROBERTA KENDALL KENNEDY, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



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Miss Hearsey's Greeting 

IT is a pleasure to send this word of greeting to the old girls at the beginning 
of our first year of peace since September 1939. However gigantic the 
problems confronting mankind today, there is at least cessation of death and 
destruction, men and women can give themselves to rebuilding, can turn 
with eager, perhaps desperate hope, to the creation of a united world. 

As one considers the peace to be created one is made increasingly aware 
that it cannot be alone the work of any organization or committee however 
high sounding its title, however authoritative its decisions. For it is in the 
area of human relations, as practiced by millions of people in every country, 
that peace is to be achieved. The qualities that lead to success in that realm 
must be cultivated and practiced by us all, more consciously and persistently 
then ever, and must be taught our children with all the speed and wisdom at 
our command. 

It is for this reason exciting and also sobering to have anything to do with 
education today and it must be even more so to have children of one's own 
to bring up ! And neither teachers nor parents, nor any thoughtful individual 
can be an "innocent bystander." "It is later than we think" and our daily 
effort or lack of effort will have its effect on the world that is in the making. 

Abbot, entering upon its 1 1 7th session, is looking forward to a good year. 
The removal of the limitations and problems of the war years makes life 
pleasanter and restores opportunities that we have had to forego for a long 
time, but this is not nearly so significant as the sense of exhilaration that 
comes with the removal of fear, and anxiety, and tension. Even in so safe and 
comfortable a place as this, young people have not escaped the psychological 
pressure of the war. 

The morale of the school through these war years has been remarkably 
good, however, and we have been forced again and again as we have ob- 
served human conduct during the fateful struggle, to the realization that 
"man seems to find his soul in conflict." Our task for the coming days and 
years is to keep alive that sense of battle and resistance; to find and participate 
in what William James many years ago called "the moral equivalent of war." 

As I send you your school's greetings for the coming year, it is good to 
realize how many hundreds of Abbot graduates are taking an active part in 
this struggle. I hope that among the generations now in college, not a few 
may consider seriously the vocation of teaching, for the need of good teachers 
is appalling. I know that mothers are thinking with constant concern about 
creating in their children the attitudes and sense of values that will lead 



toward racial and international understanding, and I am confident, also, 
that as many of the alumnae as possible, young or old, parents or "spinsters" 
are participating in their own communities in some helpful way through the 
church, the League of Women Voters, the Woman's Club, or other organ- 
izations devoted to the cause of a peaceful, free, united world. 

One of the pleasant by products of victory has been the removal of the 
restrictions on pleasure driving. Because of this it was possible for many 
parents to drive their daughters to school this year and it will also be possible 
for more old girls to come back to see us during the year. I look forward with 
much pleasure to these visits and especially to the Commencement reunions. 
There will be interesting plans and projects about the school to discuss at 
that time, I feel sure, and we shall welcome and need the participation of all 
the alumnae as we go forward into Abbot's own post-war era. 



IMffiirr/: 







SUMMER SCENE ON CAMPUS 



Faculty Changes 




Helen Dunford Robinson 



That two teachers who have given twenty-seven 
and twenty years, respectively, to Abbot Academy 
have had to resign in the same year is a great loss to 
the school. In Helen Robinson and Mary Carpenter, 
Abbot has had during their years at the school two 
loyal and devoted friends. Miss Robinson came to 
Abbot in 1918, after nine years at the Newburyport 
High School and one at the Mount Hermon School, 
and except for a half year's leave of absence in 1936, 
she taught Latin with enthusiasm and the highest 
standards during the twenty-seven years from then 
until April of this year, when a fall resulted in a 
seriously fractured hip. In two more years Miss Rob- 
inson would have reached the retirement age and it has been a great disap- 
pointment to her and to us all that her accident has made it necessary for her 
to resign this year. 

The girls who had the good fortune to be in her classes need not be 
reminded of her unfailing interest in their progress and her joy in their 
achievement. The alumnae who return will miss her friendly, eager welcome 
and will always be grateful for the appreciation she gave them for honest 
work well done. It is good to be able to report that after five months in bed 
Miss Robinson is now making encouraging progress and hopes to be able 
to walk by the end of October. Her home address is 77 Mt. Pleasant Avenue, 
Gloucester, Massachusetts, and she would be delighted to have letters from 
any of her old girls. 

Miss Carpenter came to Abbot in 1925, after 
only three years of teaching elsewhere, and undertook 
at a very youthful age her responsibility as head of 
the Physical Education Department. As the years 
passed she developed unusual ability, not only in her 
own field, but also in her social relationships with the 
girls. Her success as faculty advisor to the Athletic 
Council, and as a Corridor Teacher were marked, 
and in turn had great influence for good in the life 
of the school. 

The keen, but delightfully friendly competition 
which expressed itself through the Gargoyle-Griffin 
contests, was due largely to her wise training and 

guidance, and there are many girls who will remember lessons learned on the 

hockey field or basketball field through Miss Carpenter's quiet comments 

and suggestions, far more vividly than anything else they learned at Abbot. 

The work of a Physical Education Director requires much physical 




Mary Carpenter 



endurance, however, and Miss Carpenter felt that after twenty-three years, 
twenty of them at Abbot, it was time for her to consider some work that 
would be less strenuous physically. It was, therefore, with great reluctance 
that she presented her resignation and under the circumstances it was as 
reluctantly accepted, with full recognition of what it meant to the school. 
Miss Carpenter is planning to study this year at Columbia, in New York 
City, in the field of Guidance or Counselling. Her home address is 37 Wilkin- 
son Street, Putnam, Connecticut. 

These two losses this year, not to mention the others of members of the 
faculty who have given most generously and loyally of themselves to the 
school, press us back to the realization that the life of Abbot is deeply rooted, 
and that in the century and more that it has been growing it has been 
largely made what it is by such devoted service. The members of the faculty 
span various generations of students and each generation has inevitably a 
different pattern that makes for it the total faculty group. But there is a 
continuity to the picture and to the memories of the alumnae, and while 
some well-loved teachers will not be here to welcome them when they return, 
there are always others, and new friends are always being made. 

We give Miss Robinson our very warmest wishes for many years of happy, 
busy leisure, and to Miss Carpenter we would say that we hope her new work 
will be most satisfying and successful, — but both she and Miss Robinson must 
always consider themselves "Abbot Girls!" For the forty-seven years of faith- 
ful and affectionate service which in total Miss Robinson and Miss Carpenter 
have given to Abbot there are no words adequate to express our gratitude. 

M. C. H. 



* * 



Miss Carpenter's place as Head of the Physical Education Department 
is to be taken by Miss Oril Hunt. Miss Hunt has her B.S. degree from the 
University of Arizona and has done graduate work at Syracuse University. 
She has taught Physical Education for several years, most recently at the 
Johnson High School in North Andover. 

Miss Robinson's successor is to be Miss Edith Prescott, of Kensington, 
N. H. Miss Prescott is a graduate of Radcliffe College and comes to Abbot 
from Hannah More Academy, in Reierstown, Maryland. 

The other changes in the faculty are as follows: 

Miss Gertrud Rath who was an administrative assistant for eight years 
at Abbot has left to take a position as Executive Secretary at the Masters 
School, Dobbs Ferry, New York. Her position at Abbot is to be taken by 
Mrs. Ruth C. Reeves of Arlington, Virginia. Mrs. Reeves is a graduate of 
Hollins College and has had a variety of experience in executive and secre- 
tarial work. 

Miss Rechnitzer who taught French and German, is to be at Oldfield's 
School in Glencoe, Maryland, this year. She is succeeded by Mile. Germaine 
Arosa. Mile. Arosa who was born and educated in Paris, has had professional 



training as a diseuse, and has more recently prepared to teach French. She 
spent this summer at Middlebury College, and the five preceeding ones as a 
French tutor at L'Ecole Champlain. 

Mile. Trouve has accepted a position in the French Department of New 
Jersey College for Women, at New Brunswick, New Jersey, and will have 
charge of the French House there. Her work at Abbot is to be taken by 
Mme. Jeanne LaRoche Leisner, who has been teaching for several years at 
Miss Harris's School in Miami. 

The Spanish Classes this year will be taught by Miss Gerda Kaatz who 
comes to us from the University of Iowa, where she has recently received 
her Ph.D., and where she has had experience in teaching for several years. 

Mrs. Beck who had been with us for two years, is taking this year off 
for study and rest. 

Miss Dorothy Baker, who was a member of our English staff from 1 939- 
1940, and again from 1 941 -1944, has been in England for the past year, 
teaching in Bath. She is now able to return to Abbot and we hope will remain 
with us. Miss Padwick who took Miss Baker's place during the past year is 
to be at the Spence School, in New York. 

Mrs. Calhoun resigned in April when her husband was returned to the 
United States after his release from the internment camp in Manila. Her 
place is to be taken by Mrs. Mervin Stevens. Mrs. Stevens has had many 
years of successful teaching of Mathematics but had given up teaching after 
her marriage. She was persuaded to meet Abbot's need when Mrs. Calhoun 
had to leave and will continue her work with us for the coming year. 

For Studio Art we have been fortunate to obtain Mr. Abbott Cheever, 
a distinguished Andover artist who has been doing war work at M.I.T. for 
the last few years. Mr. Cheever will divide his time between Phillips Acad- 
emy and Abbot. 

Because of illness Miss Wilkinson's return to school this fall has been 
delayed. Her classes are taken by Miss Ivor Lou Myrh. Miss Myrh has her 
A.B. and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University and has had wide teaching 
experience. She had received a grant from the Council of Learned Societies 
to do some research this year but was willing to defer this work temporarily 
to come to our assistance. 



The World Is Ours 

Holly R. Welles 

President of the Abbot Christian Association ig^-ig^ 

IT'S a bit staggering to be suddenly told that we own a world! Why, many 
of us have never so much as set foot outside our own United States, one 
of the biggest and greatest countries that we know of and then to be informed 
that something we have never seen, something we can hardly comprehend, 
some millions of square miles of rocks, forests, and vast areas are ours, to do 
with as we please, it doesn't happen every day. Nevertheless two Sundays 
ago, at this very time, Dr. Rubendall made just such a statement. 'The 
World is yours," he said. The question we now face is, what are we going to 
do with it? 

This question of course cannot be answered quite as glibly, quite as 
easily as it is asked. We all have our ideals, our theories as to what would 
improve the conditions in our world, and there's nothing wrong with ideals 
for they give us a goal to strive for. But it isn't the ideals themselves that are 
going to answer the question, it's the actions to attain the ideals that are 
what are going to count. Of course, just what these actions are going to be is a 
personal problem for each of us, so that's not what I want to talk on tonight 
but I do want to suggest a few matters for each of us to remember as we begin 
to consider the way in which we intend to use this gift. 

First of all, let us consider just what is involved every time something 
new is added to our possessions when we were younger. This addition often 
was a toy, perhaps a doll or a game. As we began to use this game we found 
that a way for greater pleasure, even greater freedom in how we might use 
our time, had opened to us but we also found that it was we, as the owners 
who were expected to take the necessary care of this plaything if our new 
found enjoyment was to remain. Thus, unconsciously perhaps, we discovered 
that to make the most of each new freedom we would have to take over the 
responsibility of using it well, for seeing that its purpose was fulfilled by 
keeping it in good shape. It's not very difficult to see what point I'm trying 
to make. As we begin to make use of this great new possession of ours we've 
got to remember that it isn't all fun and new freedom, but that it is also a 
trust and a definite responsibility. We can't sit back and take all the world 
is offering us without giving back something definite in return. In past gen- 
erations people have greedily snatched all they could and then decided 
they couldn't be bothered to make some return to even the score. During 
the last war we fought the winning battle so that our form of government, 
democracy, might be spread over the world, an act definitely advantageous 
to us because it assured our safety and our power. And yet, it seemed like 
too much trouble to take the responsibility for maintaining this safety. We 
tried the impossible, to have our cake and eat it too, and it proved disastrous. 

Talk given at the Abbot Vesper Service on April 22. 

8 



What we have to realize is that whenever we take or are given of the world, 
whether as a great political leader, or as a housewife, we are being called 
on to give something of ourselves in return. And so, the first thing to re- 
member as we receive this gift of the world, is that with new opportunity 
comes new obligation. 

The second point we should keep in mind is a realization of whom this 
gift is intended for. "The World is yours," said Dr. Rubendall. Well, there 
are two ways of interpreting that "yours," neither of which is entirely right 
as it stands alone but both of which together form the whole truth. "Yours" 
can be taken to mean that which pertains to one person alone, or it can be 
used collectively to refer to a whole group of people. Combining these two 
meanings we have, very simply this : The World belongs to each one of us in 
our generation in that each one of us should make his life count for something 
but not at the expense of someone else's opportunity to do the same. This 
cuts down all the beliefs that any nation, creed, or color is superior to any 
other. We in the United States live in the richest, most powerful nation in the 
world. We have everything we need, just about everything we could possibly 
want. We were lucky. We did our growing early and now we are being called 
upon to use our wealth to build up the other countries, and to keep building 
them up until they too have a high standard of living. It's not going to cost 
us very much of our overwhelming luxury, this allowing of the people around 
us to achieve their rightful heritage, yet some Americans may try to keep 
away some of the small discomforts we will have to put up with by refusing 
their help in this necessary step. If we allow ourselves, our country to main- 
tain its own majority of power we will also be Hitlers trying to build up a 
master race. And so, as our second thought as we receive this gift, let us retain 
in memory the full significance of those who are meant to share this gift 
with us. We've remembered the gift — we've remembered to whom this gift 
is being given. 

Thirdly, let us always remember Him from whom this great gift is 
coming, the immortal being who created this world and all the goodness 
which is in it, who created the world and who created us in his own image 
that we might have His world, take advantage of all the fineness that He put 
into the world. "And God said, Let there be light: and there was light; And 
God saw the light, that it was good." No matter where we are, what we're 
doing, whether it be in our happiest moments of living or whether it be in the 
throes of dying itself, there is always light in this world and all we have to do 
is to realize its presence, to realize we're never alone, that with us always is 
one who is a personal being, one who is interested not only in man as a 
whole, and also in each and every one of us. We have but to ask and he will 
give us the love, friendship, understanding, the courage we lack. 

There have been many great and good people in this world, men and 
women who have spent their lives, even given their lives that some of the 
wrong which has arisen in the centuries of man's existence might be erased. 
We have heard of just a few of these people: Paul, Socrates, Joan of Arc, 



Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, but there are many more of whom we 
have never heard, people who also had shining ideals and also worked for 
them, not on such a large scale as some others, perhaps, but nevertheless 
contributing what they could to make the world better for future generations. 
They too realized their bit of a world was a gift from God, and they tried to 
make themselves worthy of the gift by living the cleanest, the most generous, 
the most decent kind of lives that they had in their power to build. 

Yes, it's our turn now. We are the generation to whom the world is 
looking. We have our ideals, and we intend to work for them, to attempt to 
bring about a more perfect state of affairs than the world has ever known, 
before we, in our turn, must give way to the generations following us. We 
will remember that responsibilities as well as freedom accompanies the gift, 
and we will remember that the gift belongs to each and every one of our 
generation existing today, and most important of all, we will remember that 
the gift is from God who is, in himself, the greatest light known to man, 
without whom we would be living in total blackness, alone unguided in our 
most discouraging and perplexing problems. We will remember that without 
Him nothing really worth while has ever been accomplished and never will 
be, either in our time or in the time to come. And as we leave this Chapel 
tonight let us echo in our hearts the words of Solomon which President 
Truman included this week in his speech to Congress: "Give therefore thy 
servant an understanding heart to judge thy people, that I may discern 
between good and bad; for who is able to judge this so great a people." 




HONOR A's 
Front row: Holly Welles, Cynthia Smith. Beatrice Van Cleve. Back row: Shirley Sommer, 
Barbara Haserick, Joan Sweeney, Miss Hearsey, Hilary Paterson, Madge Twomey. 



IO 



An Open Door 



An open door is an invitation to go forward! One 
hundred and seventeen years ago the founders of Abbot 
Academy opened the door for our school and since then 
it has been held open by many enlightened friends and 
alumnae. 



Wisdom, and a vision 
broad enough to refuse 
limitation, made possible 
the growth from one acre 
of barren field to the pres- 
ent campus; from three 
pictures to the John- 
Esther Art Gallery; and 
from a library that was 
easily accommodated in 
two bookcases on the 



ABBOT 

SECOND CENTURY 

ALUMNAE FUND 

i 945- i 946 

April 1 st to October 1st $1610.10 
Reunion Gifts (included) 



Class of 1900 
Class of 1 910 
* Class of 1920 
Class of 1930 
Class of 1935 
Class of 1940 
Class of 1942 



$30.00 
37.00 
58.00 
62.00 
25.00 
51.00 
40.00 



*In memory of Catherine Greenough 
1920. 

The Class of 1895 have made a special 
reunion gift of $1090.00 directly to the 
school for an Abbot Scholarship Fund. 



Chapel platform to the 

Means Memorial Library of approximately ten thousand 

volumes and magazines. 

Unrestricted gifts to the school through the Abbot 
Second Century Fund express the continuing vision of 
our alumnae today who are holding the door open for 
the future Abbot girl. 



11 




Josephine Bernardin 
daughter of Mary Flynn Bernardin 191 4 




Martha Anne Boynton 
sister of Mary Margaret Boynton 1942 




Elizabeth Dickerman 
granddaughter of Elizabeth Street Dickerman 

1863 



Alumnae Relatives 



in 



Class of 1945 




Janet Craig 
sister of Helen Craig 1942 




Suzanne Lei.and 
sister of Charlotte Leland 1944 



12 




Andrea Lyons 

daughter of Ruth Moore Lyons 191 6, sister 

of Ruth Lyons 1 944 




Jessamine Rugo Patton 
daughter of Jessamine Rugg Patton, 



1921 





Helen Norris 

grand-niece of Clara Hood 1875, Nellie 

Hood 1875 




Anne Marie Persson 
sister of Eva Persson 1944 




Sally M. Spear 
sister of Ellen Spear 1 940 



Joan Sweeney 
sister of Martha Sweeney Read 1937 



!3 



Fall Calendar 



Tuesday September 18, Opening of School 

Saturday September 22, School Picnic: A.C.A. Old Girl-New Girl Party in 

evening 
Sunday September 23, Vespers: Miss Hearsey 
Saturday September 2g, Senior Picnic : Richard DuBois, Magician 
Sunday September 30, Vespers: The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, Minister, 

Phillips Academy 
Saturday October 6, Corridor Stunts: Abbey, Homestead, and Sherman 
Sunday October 7, Vespers: The Reverend George L. Cadigan, Grace Church, 

Salem 
Saturday October 13, Russell Curry, Dance Recital 
Sunday October 14, Vespers: The Reverend Raymond Calkins, D.D. Minister 

Emeritus, First Church, Cambridge 
Saturday October 20, Corridor Stunts, Draper Hall excluding seniors 
Sunday October 21, Vespers: Abbot Christian Association 
Saturday October 2 1 /, Corridor Stunts, Seniors and Day Scholars: Hallowe'en 

Party 
Sunday October 28, Vespers: The Reverend James Gordon Gilkey, D.D., 

Springfield 
Sunday November 4, Vespers: The Reverend Allan K. Chalmers, D.D., 

Broadway Tabernacle, New York City 
Saturday November 10, Field Day 
Sunday November 11, Vespers: The Reverend Theodore P. Ferris, D.D., 

Trinity Church, Boston 
Saturday November 17, Lecture by Mrs. Frank Mansfield Taylor on Current 

Events 
Sunday November 18, Vespers: Dr. Claude M. Fuess, Headmaster Phillips 

Academy 
Thursday November 22, Thanksgiving Day 
Saturday November 24, Piano Recital by Miss Kate Friskin 
Sunday November 25, Vespers: The Reverend Vivian T. Pomeroy, D.D., 

Milton 
Saturday December 1, Miss Suzanne Silvercruys, Sculptress, Lecture and 

Demonstration 
Sunday December 2, Vespers: The Reverend Herbert Gesork, Professor of 

Religion at Wellesley College and Andover Newton Theological Sem- 

inarv 
Saturday December 8, A.D.S. Play 

Saturday December 15, A.C.A. Party for Andover Children: Christmas Read- 
ing, Mrs. Gray 
Sunday December 16, Christmas Vespers, Miss Hearsey 
Monday December 17, Christmas Dinner and Carol Sing 
Tuesday December 18, Christmas Vacation to January 9 



H 



Our New Alumna Trustee 




A hearty greeting to all you loyal Abbot 
alumnae from your newest and youngest 
trustee! May we all meet soon, in spirit, 
if not in person, to work together for the 
school that means so much to so many of 
us. Now that the war is over and gas no 
longer rationed, why not join your nearest 
Abbot Club? Better still, come to Andover 
where you will always find a cordial 
welcome, and see how far Abbot has 
progressed in the last few years and learn 
her plans for the future. As your represen- 
tative on the Board of Trustees, I "stand 
by" for any and all suggestions! 

Helen Allen Henry, 1932 



New Alumnae Relatives, September, ig^ 

Dorothy Lee Booth, daughter of Dorothy Taylor Booth, 1923 

Carolyn June England, sister of Nancy England Worthen 1939, and sister of 
Betty Jean England 1 942 

Helen Florence Mastrangelo, sister of Alma 1944 

Nancy Newhall, daughter of Ruth Winn Newhall 1920 

Mary Annis Rich, granddaughter of Annis Spencer Gilbert 1889; daughter of 
Helen Gilbert Rich 1914; sister of Elizabeth G. Rich 1944. 

Mackay Selden, cousin of Anne Selden 1941 

Barbara Smith, daughter of Frances Skolfield Smith 191 2 

Felicia A. Tavares, sister of Julia 1944 

Mary L. White, daughter of Charlotte Hudson White 1923 

Relatives of Girls in School 

Frances M. Brumback, sister of Martha Ellen Brumback 1946 

Nancy Ellen Brumback, cousin of Martha Ellen Brumback 1946, cousin of 
Frances Marie Brumback, entering in 1 945 

Paula Flowers, sister of Ann 1947 

Elinor C. Massie, cousin of Virginia L. Finney 1946 

Marion H. Morriss, niece of Miss Margaret S. Morriss, Dean of Pembroke 
College, and a Trustee of Abbot Academy 



15 




Class 



1895 

Laura Wentworlh Rich- 
ards, Helen Elizabeth Muz 
zey 



1900 

Winona Algie, Miss Nellie 
Mason, Mary Bancroft, 
Grace Chapman Spear, 
Edith Valpey 



1910 

First row: Louise Tuttle 
Abbott, Ruth Murray 
Moore 

Top row: Lillian Johnson 
Smith, Dora Heys Pym, | 
Ruth Newcomb, Ethel Re- 
gehuth Darby, Emily Silsby 
Morgan 



Reunions 



1915 

First row: Norma Allen 
Haine, Jessie Nye Blodgett, 
Marion Brooks, Marian 
Winklebeck Lowes 

Top row: Mary Flynn 
Bernardin, Marian Barnard 
Cole, Catherine Leach, 
Elizabeth Leach, Eleanor 
Bartlett Atwater, Elizabeth 
Allen Belknap, Phyllis 
Brooks Stevens 



1920 

First row: Lee Wicker- 
sham Mills, Isabel Suther- 
land Kurth 

Top row: Edna Dixon 
Mansur, Ruth Winn New- 
hall, Irene Franklin Foster, 
Margaret Ackroyd Hunt, 
Katherine Hamblet 



1925 

First row: Barbara Nelson 
Twombley, Gertrude Hol- 
brook, Elaine Boutwell Von 
Weber 

Top row: Eunice Hunts- 
man, Evelyn McDougall 
Hay, Susan Daniell Burgess 





1930 

First row: Elizabeth Tarr 
Morse, Kathie Fellows In- 
graham, Jean Harrington 
Farr, Betty Quinby Johnson, 
Doris Sturtevant Bacon 

Top row: Janice Lovell 
Jenkins, Mary Jane Owsley 
Warwick, Marianna Smith 
Hile, Ruth Baker Johnson, 
Mary Shepard Wiley, Bar- 
bara Lamson Cummings, 
Alma Hill, Betty Brown 
Guild 



1935 

First row: Frances Mc- 
Ternen Coan, Clara Holland 
Chase 

Top row: Lucia Nunez 
Mason, Doris Anderson 
Clark, Susan Hildreth 
Goodwin 



1940 

First row: Nancy Harri- 
son, Joan Webster, Jeanne 
Cowles Wilson 

Top row: Carolyn Bitt- 
ner, Ruth Poore, Dorothy 
Garry 



Abbot Clubs 



BOSTON (1892): President, Mrs. Gwen- 
dolyn Bloomfield Tillson '22; Vice-presidents, 
Mrs. Virginia Gay d'Elseaux '28; Mrs. 
Elizabeth Sage Batchelder '33: Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. Louise Risley Floyd '37; 
Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Marion Conant 
Ireland '27; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Nay 
Gramkow '27; Auditor, Mrs. Mary Piper 
Sears '28; Program Chairman, Mrs. Faith 
Chipman Parker '31; Directors 1 944-1946, 
Mrs. Katharine Allen Babson '31, Mrs. 
Martha Ransom Tucker '37, Miss Priscilla 
Richards '31. Directors 1 945-1947, Mrs. 
Lydia Kunkel Eldredge '21, Miss Irene 
Atwood '18, Mrs. Ruth Baker Johnson '30. 

A buffet luncheon will be held Wednes- 
day, November, 7 at the College Club. 

CHICAGO (192 1): President, Mrs. J. 
Allen Lind (Mary Simpson); Secretary, Mrs. 
Edith Bullen Creeden, 461 Hill Rd., Win- 
netka; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Hall Walker. 

CONNECTICUT (1923): President, Miss 
Sara Peck, 20 Fairview Ter., Derby; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Lawton Cheney, 
36 Morse St., Hamden. 

The annual meeting will be held this fall. 

DETROIT (1922): President, Mrs. Thom- 
as Nalle (Harriet Balfe) , 1 2 1 1 Willow Lane, 
Birmingham. 

MAINE, EASTERN (1926): President, 
Miss Eleanor Bird, 250 Broadway, Rockland; 
Vice-president, Mrs. Frances McDougall Mc- 
Loon; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Annetta 
Richards Bryant, Round Pond. 



MAINE, WESTERN (1922): President, 
Mrs. Harold Robinson (Harriette Woolver- 
ton), Cape Elizabeth; Treasurer, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Baldwin Frohock. 

The club hopes to resume meetings this 
year. 

NEW YORK (1898): President, Miss 
Gertrude Holbrook '25; Vice-presidents, Mrs. 
Laura Scudder Williamson '24, Mrs. Helga 
Lundin Buttrick '23; Recording Secretary, Mrs. 
Grace Leyser Boynton '19; Corresponding 
Secretary, Mrs. Jane Owsley Warwick '30; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Ruth Cann Baker '3 1 ; 
Directors, Mrs. Helen Danforth Prudden '13, 
Mrs. Eunice Meigs Pease '21, Mrs. Ethel 
Thompson James '24. 

The fall meeting will be held Saturday, 
December 1. Miss Hearsey will be the 
guest of honor. 

OHIO, CENTRAL (1921): President, 
Secretary, Mrs. Paul Meek (Louise Norpell), 
5600 Meek Rd., Worthington. 

OHIO, CLEVELAND (1927): President, 
Mrs. George Worthington (Madeleine Fiske), 
Chesterland, Ohio. 

OLD COLONY (1924): President, Mrs. 
Richard M. Thompson (Ruth Niles), 300 
Woodlawn St., Fall River; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Mrs. Louise Thompson Cortrell, 
372 Madison St., Fall River. 

The annual meeting will be held late in 
October. 

PITTSBURGH (192 1): President, Mrs. 
George H. Jackson (Gertrude Miller), But- 
ler, Pa.; Secretary, Mrs. Joseph M. Browne 
(Eliza Atwell), 529 Pine Rd., Sewickley. 



GIFTS TO ABBOT 

From two appreciative parents of recent graduates: $500.00 each. 

From the Class of 1945, for re-furnishing the Senior Parlor: $300.00. 

From an alumna: $100.00. 

From the Class of 1895, for an Abbot Scholarship Fund: $1090.00. 

Maud Morgan has presented to the school her oil painting, "Green 
Landscape." 



*9 




■—■ .- :**,** }&?■*■' 



Alumnae Association 

Annual Meeting of the Abbot Alumnae Association, May ig, ig^j 



The annual meeting of the Abbot Alumnae 
Association was held on Saturday, May 19, 
in Abbot Hall. Mrs. Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 
presided in the absence of the president, 
Mrs. Roberta Kendall Kennedy. A record 
attendance of over one hundred listened 
with keen interest to the routine reports 
from the officers of the Association. The 
clerk, Mrs. Susan Hildreth Goodwin; treas- 
urer, Mrs. Laura Cheever Downs; auditor, 
Mrs. Jean David Blunt; executive secretary, 
Miss Marion McPherson, and general sec- 
retary, Mrs. Constance Parker Chipman. 
Mrs. Chipman also read the list of twenty- 
one alumnae who had died during the year. 

An attractive feature of the meeting was 
the arrival of the senior class who were pre- 
sented by Miss Hearsey to the Association 
as an outstanding group of new alumnae, 
and who were accepted in the name of the 
Association by Mrs. d'Elseaux. Miss Hearsey 
then extended her always cordial greeting 



and welcome to the alumnae, expressing 
also her regret that Mrs. Polly Bullard 
Holden's term of office as alumna trustee 
had expired. Mrs. Holden has made a not- 
able contribution to the cause of alumnae 
relations as a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees. 

Announcement was then made of the 
election to the Board of the new alumna 
trustee, Mrs. Helen Allen Henry 1937, 
daughter of Mrs. Helen Abbott Allen 1904, 
who will serve a term of six years. Miss 
Margaret Van Voorhis, senior alumna 
trustee told the alumnae of her pleasure in 
representing them on the Board, and urged 
their fuller co-operation with Mrs. Henry 
and herself. The president of the New York 
Abbot Club, Miss Gertrude Holbrook, 
brought greetings from the club, and invited 
all who could to attend the meetings of the 
club, in December and April. 

Reports were made by the reunion chair- 



20 



men of the following classes: 1895, Miss 
Helen Elizabeth Muzzey; 1900, Miss Mary 
Bancroft; 1905, Mrs. Frances Cutler Knick- 
erbocker; 1910, Mrs. Emily Silsby Morgan; 
191 5, Miss Marion Brooks: 1920, Mrs. Isabel 
Sutherland Kurth; 1925, Mrs. Evelyn 
McDougall Hay; 1930, Mrs. Kathie Fellows 
Ingraham; 1935,. Mrs. Doris Anderson 
Clark; 1940, Mrs. Jeanne Cowles Wilson; 
1944, Miss Nancy Mclvor. 

Mrs. d'Elseaux invited all to attend the 
social period in the Alumnae Headquarters, 
and expressed her appreciation of the work 
of the tea committee, Mrs. Hilda Lynde 
Wylie, and Mrs. Betty Dix Goddard. 

The meeting was then declared adjourned 
until 1946, when the 75th anniversary of the 
Alumnae Association will be observed. 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 1944-45 

RECEIPTS — June 1, 1944 

Balance in Andover National 

Bank $ 809.72 

Interest from invested fund 25 1 . 56 

Check for Centennial Plate 2 . 00 



$ 30.00 
3-05 

16.57 



♦EXPENDITURES 

Alumni Council dues 

Abbot Commencement 

Mrs. Chipman's expenses New 

York Abbot Club 
American Alumni Council 

meeting at Amherst 
Senior Coffee Party 
Announcements for Spring 

meeting of Association 
Speaker for Spring meeting 
Postmaster — stamps for use of 

treasurer 



Total Si 59. 52 

Balance in Andover National 

Bank 903 . 76 



27 


.90 


4. 


75 


25 


.40 


50 


.00 


I 


•85 



Total receipts 



11,063.28 



$1,063.28 
Respectfully submitted 

Laura C. Downs 
May 14, 1945 

I have examined the within accounts and 
find the balance $903.76 correct. 

Jean D. Blunt, 

A uditor 
*condensed for publication 



In Memoriam 



1864 



Clara Fisher, widow of Judson Baldwin, 
died on September 6, in Roxbury. 

1868 

Harriet Abbott, widow of Rev. Francis E. 
Clark, died on September 24', in her 95th 
year. She with her husband founded the 
Christian Endeavor Movement in 1881, and 
together they travelled around the world 
carrying on the Christian Endeavor work. 
Today it includes members of eighty denom- 
inations, in more than one hundred coun- 
tries. She was internationally known as the 
"mother of Christian Endeavor." 

Rebecca Davis, wife of the late Dr. George 
A. Spalding, and mother of Honora Spald- 
ing 1902, died on September 18, in Amherst, 
N.H. 

1879 

Susan Aiken, widow of Charles W. Perry, 
died February 1 . 

1880 

Anna Potter Chamberlain died on Jan- 
uary 30. 

Edna Thompson, widow of James A. 
Towle, died August 22 in West Roxbury. 



She leaves a son Franklin W. Towle, a 
daughter Marian Towle Sturgis, 1908. 

1884 
Marcia W. Morse, Mrs. George L. Davis 
died on October 30, 1943. 

1886 
Abbie Sheldon, Mrs. Charles J. Sargent, 
died in 1942. 

1887 
Catherine F. Crocker died August 20. 

1889 

Edith Puffer Moore died May 3, in Florida. 
She leaves a son, Lawrence Moore Jr. and a 
daughter, Elizabeth Moore Hood, 1918. 

1890 

Hattie I. Bliss, widow of Richard L. Rich- 
ard, died on November 29, 1944, in Spokane, 
Washington. 

1897 

Elizabeth L. Forsyth died December 16, 

1943- 

1900 

Edith Valpey died on September 18, in 
Andover. 

1920 
Catherine Greenough died on April 1 1 . 



21 



Class News 



1874 

John H. Manning, husband of Mary 
Woodbridge, died in Andover, on May 25. 

1881 

Frederic Bayley Pratt, husband of Caro- 
line Ladd, died May 3, at Glen Cove, L. I. 
Six years ago Mr. and Mrs. Pratt celebrated 
their fiftieth wedding anniversary. A son, 
Charles Pratt had succeeded his father as 
president of Pratt Institute. Mr. Pratt was 
for thirty years vice-president of the Brook- 
lyn Bureau of Charities. 

1885 

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm has sent the pros- 
pectus of her new book "Old John Neptune 
and Other Maine Indian Shamans," pub- 
lished by the Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 
Portland, Maine. 

1889 

Marion Howard Hutchinson and her hus- 
band celebrated their 50th wedding anni- 
versary in August 1944, with four children, 
nine grandchildren and one great grandchild 
present. Four boys are in the service. She is 
now living permanently in Hampton, New 
Hampshire. 

Annis Spencer Gilbert's granddaughter 
Mary Annis Rich, is one of the new girls this 
fall. 

1892 

Fanny Gordon Bartlett made the front page 
of the Boston Herald in August in the story of 
her son, Lt. Com. Samuel Bartlett, whose 
services were spoken of as valuable to Gen- 
eral MacArthur in connection with the sur- 
render and advance occupation, because of 
his proficiency in the Japanese language and 
knowledge of the people, not only from his 
boyhood life with his missionary parents, 
but from later experience in business there. 
Since then in Boston he had served in im- 
portant capacities on labor and employment 
security boards. His two brothers, Lt. Don- 
ald and Lt. Robert also in the Navy, have 
been in the Pacific, and Dr. Agnes at an 
Arizona hospital. 

1895 

Only two members of the class were able 
to attend their Fiftieth Reunion, Helen 
Elizabeth Muzzey and Laura Wentworth 
Richards. However the reunion was a not- 
able one. The class has made the generous 



gift of Si 090.00 to an Abbot Scholarship 
Fund. 

1896 

Grace Pearson Preston's son, Com. Alex- 
ander Pearson Preston, was married on May 
26, to Mary R. Heard, in Cambridge. 

Florence Holt, for many years a teacher 
in the Andover public schools, is now living 
with her niece, Pauline Burtt Wallace, 1932, 
in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. 

1897 

Jason D. Emerson, husband of Edith H. 
Taylor, died on September 10. 

1900 

The class of 1900 held its 45th reunion 
with four members present. We met for the 
reading of letters from those not able to be 
with us, and exchanged class news, after 
which we went to Constance Chipman's for 
luncheon, having Miss Mason as our hon- 
ored guest. 

After the interesting Alumnae meeting 
there was a chance to visit with old friends. 
We were the guests of the school at dinner in 
the beautiful Bailey dining room. The day 
ended with the Draper Dramatics. Even 
though we were so few in numbers, it was a 
great joy to be together again. 

Mary Bancroft, Reunion Chairman 

Dr. John Gale Hun, husband of Leslie 
Crawford, died on September 15, in Prince- 
ton, N.J. In 191 7 Dr. Hun founded the Hun 
School in Princeton which has drawn boys 
of pre-college age from many states in the 
union. 

1901 

Charlotte Holt Burtt has a responsible 
position in one of the cottages at the Perkins 
Institution for the Blind. Her married son 
has been a bomber pilot in the Pacific, and 
Brooks is an army corporal. Two grand- 
children are the small daughters of Pauline 
Burtt Wallace, 1932. 

1902 

Florence Lindenberg Harrison's daughter 
Clara Louise was married to Lt. Charles 
Henry Kent on August 25. 

Send that new address at once to the 
Alumnae Office! 



22 



1903 

Edith Burnham Roberts' son John Burnham 
Roberts was married on June 2 to Jane C. 
Rile. He is a graduate of Dartmouth, re- 
ceived his M.S. degree from M.I.T., and has 
been a chemical engineer with the E. I. 
Dupont Co. since 1936. Edith has been 
chairman of Gray Ladies of the Manchester 
Red Cross, and has worked at the Grenier 
Field Air Base Hospital throughout the war. 

1904 

Helen Abbott Allen has a new grand- 
daughter Nancy Abbott Allen, born to her 
son Lawrence Allen, Jr., August 21. 

1905 

Frances Cutler Knickerbocker and Fannie 
Erving Arundale represented their class at 
their Fortieth Reunion. 

Elizabeth Cole has returned to Andover 
from New York to take charge of the Book 
Department in the Andover Book Store. 

1908 

Winifred Ogden Lindley announces the 
arrival of grandchildren, born to her two 
sons. John Marshall Lindley, III, born 
March 26, and twins, Priscilla Ann and 
Margaret Chappie born on July 10. Her 
daughter Winifred is working in a newly 
set-up psychological department at M.I.T. 

1909 

Frances Wright Kimball's son, Frederick 
Wright Kimball was married to Alice Marie 
James on August 1 1 . 

Alice Holt Jenkins who took her husband's 
place as manager of the Walnuthurst Dairy 
in Andover after his death some years ago, 
has her daughter Eleanor at home with her. 
Elizabeth is near her husband, Capt. 
Wright, who is stationed at Wright Field in 
Ohio. Pfc. Burton is in France. 

1910 

Seven members held a successful Thirtieth 
reunion luncheon: Dora Heys Pym, Lillie 
Johnson Smith, Ruth Murray Moore, Ruth 
Newcomb, Ethel Regeluith Darby, Emily 
Silsby Morgan, and Louise Tut tie Abbott. 

Clarissa Hall Hammond's son Hal, is 
entering Harvard College this fall. 

1911 

Bernice Boutwell Parson's three sons are 
growing up fast. Phil Jr. eighteen, has com- 
pleted his pre-medical work at Syracuse 



University and is entering New York Uni- 
versity Medical School. Douglas has grad- 
uated from Tilton School for Boys, and 
Milton twelve, is in Junior High. Bernice is 
teaching weaving at the Lovell Hospital at 
Fort Devens once a week. 

Charlotte Cowing Cooper has returned to 
this country after twenty-six months in the 
South Pacific as an executive of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross field staff. Her work included 
the operation of a club for enlisted men of the 
1 st Cavalry; directing a club for nurses; and 
later becoming head of the arts and crafts 
section of the Southwest Pacific. She has 
now become head occupational therapist at 
the Army's Fletcher General Hospital, 
Cambridge, Ohio. 

Ruth JViles Thompson became a grand- 
mother on the arrival on April 23, of a 
daughter Deborah Wallace Dodge, to her 
daughter Elizabeth. Her younger son Ted 
enters Yale November 1 . 

Katherine Ordway Parker's daughter 
Marjorie, was married on September 29, to 
Capt. George Austin Dorr, Jr. 

Dorothy Small Wescott's daughter Jane 
was married last November to James Lamb 
in the Coast Guard Service. Last May she 
graduated from Wheelock College, and is 
opening a kindergarten in Nantucket this 
fall. 

1912 

Frances Skol field Smith's daughter Bar- 
bara, is one of the new girls at Abbot. 

1913 

Gladys Estabrook Blanchard's son, Ensign 
Edward P. Blanchard, Jr. was married on 
April 28 to Cornelia A. Crossley. 

1914 

Married: Constance Barbev to Frederic 
Channing Bowditch, in September, in 
Brookline. 

Helen Gilbert Rich has sent a second 
daughter to Abbot this fall, Mary Annis 
Rich. Elizabeth graduated in 1944. 

Frances Jones Steinmetz writes, "Having 
always lived so far away from Abbot, my 
personal contacts have become fewer and 
fewer as the years go by. The Bulletin, 
therefore, brings me a great deal of pleasure 
and anticipation. Having noticed in the last 
Bulletin, that my roommate, Frances 
Dowd Chittenden has a family similar to 
mine, I was inspired to record my three, 



23 



Marilyn is finishing her sophomore year at 
Mills College, Phil is leaving for Stanford, 
he will be eighteen in December, and Bobby 
will be in the fourth grade next year. My 
war work is at the Red Cross Blood Donor 
Center here in Portland (Oregon)." 

1915 

Dear "i gibers": Little did I think the 
response would be so great. Almost everyone 
sent some word and eleven girls were on 
hand for the class luncheon. Perhaps the 
illusion will be shattered (see photo) but we 
all thought we looked "about the same" 
despite perhaps added poundage, or loss of 
same, and some gray hairs. We shared ex- 
periences and admired photographs. Quite 
naturally the foremost topic was the war 
and the sons fighting in it. Let me say here 
how happy I am for all of you whose sons 
will soon be returning. It has been a long 
hard vigil. We have our own WAC, Muriel 
Baker Wood who wrote from "somewhere in 
Italy" where she had been for fourteen 
months. Her son was in France with the 
7th Army. Muriel Winklebeck Lowes came 
the greatest distance from Cincinnati. She 
is enthusiastic about her job and a great 
rooter for Cincinnati. Bunny Allen Belknap 
has two sons in the service, a young daughter 
at home. Her husband is assistant circulation 
manager for Time, Life and Fortune mag- 
azines. Phyllis Brooks Stevens has two sons 
in the service, one married. Her husband 
has been in Europe making a survey of man- 
ufacturing plants in various countries. 
Elizabeth and Catherine Leach were with 
us. Elizabeth still teaching in high school. 
One of "her boys" helped raise the flag at 
Iwo Jima. Catherine spent last winter at 
Pinehurst doing publicity work. Marian 
Barnard Cole joined us. Mary Flynn Ber- 
nardin's daughter was in the graduating 
class. Eleanor Bartlett Atwater came from 
Providence. She had two sons in the service. 
Jessie Nye Blodgett is a grandmother. Norma 
came on from Hartford. In June she went 
to California to see her son, returning again 
in August for his marriage to Kathleen 
Scott on August 15. 

Rena Atwood Benson wrote she couldn't 
leave her home duties. Mildred Akerley 
Browning was too busy farming without 
help. Her son was in India, and her daughter 
in the School of Nursing at the University 
of Conn. Martha Lamberton Osmer sent 



greetings from California. Helen Bruce But- 
ler's son was in Italy, her daughter recently 
engaged. Helen is in the office of the New 
Hampton School for Boys. Mattie Larrabee 
Whittemore wrote she was too busy with her 
family and three grandchildren. She looks 
too young for the role! Ada Wilkey Bull was 
moving to Albany. Gertrude Shackleton 
Hacker's son has entered Maine Maritime 
Academy for a course in training for the 
Merchant Marine. 

Betty Gleason Bowen is back in this country 
with her husband and son after a long con- 
finement by the Japanese in Manilla. Esther 
Sheldon Caldwell was on the "graveyard 
shift" at the Navy yard. One of her sons was 
in the Aleutians, another a paratrooper, two 
more at home. Charlotte Morris Perot had a 
son in France. 

Let's start planning for a 100% attendance 
in 1950. As Miss Hearsey said so well in her 
last letter (aren't her letters a joy?) "It is 
good to turn our memories to places and 
times when life was comparatively un- 
troubled, where lasting friendships were 
made, where we obtained something that 
has held us in good stead through the years." 

Please send further news notes to the 
Alumnae Office, and many thanks for your 
co-operation . 

Marion Brooks, Reunion Chairman 

1916 

Mildred Jenkins Dalrymple's daughter 
Esther, was married to Ensign Daniel Parke 
Valpey on August 25, in Methuen. Her sister 
Elaine Dalrymple Borowski, '40, was her 
matron of honor. 

Mildred's first grandchild, Robert Philip 
Borowski was born on May 29, to her 
daughter Elaine Dalrymple Borowski, Abbot 
1940. 

1917 

Esther Hungerford Staub sends welcome 
news of her family. "My daughter Suzanne, 
is a Junior this year at Middlebury College, 
Vermont, and one of her friends is Ada 
Wilkey Bull's stepdaughter. My younger 
daughter Sally, graduated from Newton 
High School in June and is now a Freshman 
at Endicott Junior College in Beverly. This 
summer my husband and I spent part of our 
vacation at Nantucket and had dinner with 
Dot Small Wescott '17. We talked over the 
'good old days' at Abbot.' ' 



24 



Cornelia Newcomb Lattin's son Frederic, 
was married on June 8 to Marie C. Robert- 
son. Cornelia, her daughter Harriet, and 
Ruth Newcomb went to Danville, Virginia, 
for the wedding. Ensign Lattin graduated 
June 6 from the U.S.C.G. Academy and is 
now on the USS Callaway. Fred's grand- 
mother, Harriet Chapell Newcomb '76, 
loaned her cottage in New London for the 
honeymoon, where the couple lived until 
Fred completed his course. His wife will 
resume her studies this fall at the Woman's 
College, University of North Carolina. 

Mary Wuichet DeArmon sends word of her 
family. Reed Jr., Serg. in Infantry has been 
in Germany all last winter, was awarded 
the Bronze Star for action near St. Lo, and 
later received the Oak Leaf Cluster. Charles 
is a clerk in the anti-aircraft branch of the 
coast artillery. Suzanne is a freshman in the 
high school. 

1918 

Ruth Allen Healy's husband Kent T. 
Healy has been named professor of Trans- 
portation at Yale University. 

Louise Bacon Fuller's daughter Anne, was 
married on March 1, to Major John Robert 
Lyons, in Gadsden, Alabama. 

1920 

The Twenty-five year class had seven 
present at their luncheon: Margaret Ackroyd 
Hunt, Edna Dixon Mansur, Irene -Franklin 
Foster, Katherine Hamblet, Lee Wicker- 
sham Mills, Ruth Winn Newhall, Isabel 
Sutherland Kurth. 

Ruth Winn Newhall's daughter Nancy, 
has entered Abbot this fall. 

It's time to enter that daughter in Abbot 
for 1946 or 1947! 

1921 

Kathleen Dike writes "Since 1941 I have 
been doing precision work in a war plant, 
and in 1942 I took a three months canteen 
course and I have volunteered fifteen hours 
a week serving food and doing hostess work 
at a service club in Boston. This month of 
May I plan to take a course as psychiatric 
aide to enable me to help in the hospitals 
for returned wounded soldiers. My hobbies: 
singing lessons, painting, knitting, golf and 
dressmaking. The years have been interest- 
ing, many successes and many mistakes, but 



Abbot character building shows through 
many times to keep, us useful and happy." 

Millicent Bartlett Holmberg and her hus- 
band have recently held an exhibition of 
their respective arts in Hollywood. Cal. 
Her's were paintings including Mobiles and 
Reversibles, an interpretation of the Tempo 
of our Times, Earl Holmberg exhibited 
sculptures in wood and stone. 

Send that new address at once to the 
Alumnae Office! 

1923 

Charlotte Hudson White's daughter Mary, 
has entered Abbot. 

Dorris Krum Little has been working for 
over two years at the Sprague Electric Co. 
in North Adams. She is an inspector of 
electric capacitors and resistors going into 
war equipment. She says she enjoys reading 
about her Abbot friends in the Bulletin. 

Dee Osborne Hall wrote "It was so fine to 
read news of "23ers" in the last Bulletin 
that I've made up my mind to send in news 
of me and mine whenever I have it, and I 
wish every other "23ers" would do likewise! 
I've been president of our women's club, 
chairman of the last clothing drive, carry 
on as a minister's wife, and cope with the 
trials and tribulations and fun of a teen ager. 
Jack, fourteen is entering the Lawrenceville 
School in Lawrenceville, N.J. 

Dorothy Taylor Booth's daughter Dorothy 
Lee, has entered Abbot this fall. 

1924 

Elizabeth Bragg Macintosh has two boys; 
her husband is General Manager of the 
magazine "Skyways" and other aviation 
publications. Thanks to Helen Keating Ott 
for sending Elizabeth's address to the Alum- 
nae Office! 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John Holden 
(Polly Bullard) a fourth child, Martha Jane, 
April 6. 

Blair Perry, son of Ruth Kelley Perry won 
first prize in the contest sponsored by the 
League of Women Voters. His essay was 
entitled "Dumbarton Oaks and World 
Security." 

Olive Mitchell Roberts writes that "the 
oldest of my four daughters has entered 
Cambridge Mt. Auburn Hospital as a Cadet 
Nurse. She is the namesake of Barbara 
Loomer '24." 



25 



1925 

Six members of our class were present at 
our 20th reunion luncheon at Mrs. Chip- 
man's home. Elaine Boutwell Von Weber, 
Susan Daniell Burgess, Gertrude Holbrook, 
Eunice Huntsman, Evelyn McDougnll Hay 
and Barbara Nelson Twombley. After lunch 
we went to the Annual Meeting and later 
were taken around the school to see the 
improvements in Draper; the dining room 
and library in the new wing. We had a very 
delicious dinner with the school and then 
went out to "Barb" Twombley to catch 
up on class news. We were disappointed that 
some who had hoped to come could not 
make it. Doris Von Culin Breyer sent greet- 
ings, she is busy with Victory gardening and 
Red Cross surgicals. Marion Quain Kaiser 
wished us much joy and pleasure in our 
meeting together. The class baby, Patricia 
Kaiser is eighteen years old. 

Address unknown: Annie Estes Mayo. 

Evelyn McDougall Hay, 

Reunion Chaiman 

1928 

Josephine Paret Barrett's husband is a 
Major in the Air Corps. She has two children 
Colin, six, and Alison, three years old. Her 
father, Louis Paret died in October 1944. 

Enter your daughter now in Abbot for 
1946. 

1929 

Emily Hanson Moss writes from Bermuda 
that she hopes friends will be sure and look 
her up if any travel her way this winter. 
Her son Tom is in private school there, and 
Lois, four, "should be a boy." Her address 
is Karen, Fairylands, Pembroke, Bermuda. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Rolfe M. Kennedy 
(Roberta Kendall) a second son, Rolfe 
Mason, Jr., July 14. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Richard Gerstell 
(Vivian Southworth) a second son, Arnold 
Taylor, May 2. 

Frederic W. W'hittemore, father of Pris- 
cilla 1929, husband of Polly Butterfield, 
1895, and brother of Margaret 1898 and 
Helen 1901, died on August 30. 

1930 

The Class of 1930 had a most successful 
Fifteenth reunion with thirteen present 
including the very small son of Betty Brown 



Guild. Those who met for their luncheon 
were: Ruth Baker Johnson, Betty Brown 
Guild, Kathie Fellows Ingraham, Jean 
Harrington Farr, Alma Hill, Barbara Lamson 
Cummings, Janice Lovell Jenkins, Mary 
Jane Owsley Warwick, Betty Quinby Johnson, 
Marianna Smith Hile, Doris Sturtevant Bacon, 
Elizabeth Tarr Morse, Mary Shepard Wiley. 

Alice Canoune Coates reports that she has 
two prospective Abbot girls. Nancy Pearce 
aged three and one half, and Marian Louise 
born June 21st. She continues, "To keep my 
hands from being too idle I have been deep 
in club work, Literature chairman of the 
Monday Afternoon Club, and Publicity 
Chairman for Plainfield Community Con- 
certs. My husband is now Assistant Actuary 
with the Equitable Life Assurance Society. 

Married: Elizabeth O'N. Stout to Harry 
August Volz, Jr., September 22, in Ben 
Avon, Pa. 

1932 

Pauline Burtt Wallace of Cape Elizabeth, 
Maine, has two children, Judith, four, and 
Susan two. 

Born: To 2nd Lt. and Mrs. Norman Ham- 
ilton (Marian Dix) a son, Stuart Phipps, 
April 17. 

Married: Elizabeth Holihan to Lt. John 
F. Giblin, April 14, in Andover. Her sister, 
Marie Holihan Foley was her matron of 
honor. 

Susan Johnstone is Section Economist for 
the Sugar Section of the Food Price Division 
of O.P.A. in Washington. 

1933 

Ethel Rogers went to India to serve as 
an American Red Cross Hospital staff aide. 

1935 

Their Tenth Reunion was attended by a 
group of five members of the class: Doris 
Anderson Clark, Susan Hildreth Goodwin, 
Clara Holland Chase, Frances McTernen Coan 
and Lucia Nunez Mason. 

Nancy Carr Holmes' husband has been on 
duty at Fort Benning, Ga. since his return 
from service overseas, and a long hospitaliza- 
tion here. She, with her two and a half year 
old son are with him. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Harry L. Mac- 
Cready (Barbara Chamberlain) a daughter, 
Ann Ruthvren, August 5. 

Elizabeth Murphy Garrison writes that her 
"twins require more than a modicum of time 



26 



and energy. They are just as different as day 
and night. Mark is a great big old brunette 
fatty, and Ray is a wild, wiry blonde. I still 
keep up the dramatics which serve to bal- 
ance the diapers and formulas!*' 

1936 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Gage Olcott 
(Helen Marie O'Brien a son. August 23. *** 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm S. 
Loring Anne Russell a daughter, Elizabeth 
Stokes on' May 9. 

1937 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Warren E. Sumner 
Cynthia Holbrook a son. Charles Allen 
Sumner 2nd. August 18. 

Married: Jeannette Partridge to Sydney 
Packard Harrison. June 2. 

Ruth Rose is a laboratory technician at 
Station Hospital. Newark Army Air base. 

1938 

Born: To Capt. and Mrs. John C Brown 
Mary Elliot a daughter. Margaret Cad- 
man. August 27. 

Married: Rosa T. Fletcher to Capt. 
Michael Pue Crocker. June 1 1, in Lexington. 
Virginia. Henrietta Fletcher '39 was her 
sister's maid of honor. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Donald A. Ross 
Calla Owen a daughter Calla Jean. Aug- 
ust 1944. Calla' s address is unknown, will 
someone send it to the Alumnae Office? 

Sally Peck has signed up with the Red 
Cross for a :; tour of duty."' She was told 
when interviewed," you will go in as a low 
menial servant, becoming by degrees an 
efficient housewife and interior decorator, 
and emerging finally, as a gracious hostess!" 

Married: Barbara L. Rice to T Sgt. Jones 
Bond Jackson. August 22. 

Born: To Major and Mrs. John B. Boothby 
'Virginia Thayer a daughter Josselyn. on 
June 17, 1944. 

1939 

Married: Margit Hintz to Pfc. Edward 
Julius Lorenze 3rd., on June 23. in New York 
City. A classmate. Evelyn Gottschalk Crain 
was her matron of honor. 

Married: Joan Killian to Capt. Thomas 
Oliver Dunbar. AAF, on August 19. in 
Washington. D. C. 

Married: Carol Parker Armour to Robert 
Walter Nickse, June 9. 

Married: Jeanne Waugh to William Selby 



Harney. Jr. on June 2. in Andover. Her 
sifter Joan '41. was her maid of honor. 

1940 

The Class of '40 turned out in grand 
style for its fifth reunion with around 
twenty-four present. Five years doesn't seem 
to make much difference except that we 
began to feel our age creeping up on us when 
we looked at the undergraduates. However 
Abbot itself, despite the beautiful new wing, 
made us feel very much at home, and the 
faculty were as wonderful as ever to us. By 
some miracle they seem to have grown 
younger and lost their awesomeness in the 
intervening five years! One of the high spots 
of reunion was digging up the treasure. We 
found it safe in its sealed box. and managed 
to pry out its contents, chocolate ; 'gromey 3 ' 
crumbs, torn gossip sheet, broken record etc. 
with much hilarity. I hope we will have as 
much of a group back for the next reunion. 
Riv. will be our chairman in 1950. 

Jeanne Cowles Wilson 

Molly Chase Foster's husband has just gone 
overseas, and she is with her family in Mil- 
ton. Sally Cole has a job with A. S. Greer 
Co. in Cambridge, and is living at 130 
Myrtle St., Boston. Elaine Dalrymple Borow- 
ski's son, Robert Philip was born on May 29. 

Mary Howard is Employment Manager 
for Women at Jordan Marsh Co., Boston. 
Jacquy Proctor De Brun is with her family in 
Xewton as her husband is going to work in 
Boston. 

Anne Rivinius' mother, Mrs. George 
Rivinius died on September 16, in Win- 
chester. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Harold D. Soil en - 
berger Elizabeth Travis ) a son, Robert 
Travis, September 14, at Pensacola. Florida. 

Marcia Wheeler Falconer and her husband 
have recently paid a visit to Abbot. 

Marietta Meyer was married on June 10 
to William A. Ekberg, at Detroit Lakes. 
Minnesota. 

Marjorie McClellan graduated in June 
from Connecticut College as a mathematics 
major, and as a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 
She is now employed by the U. S. West and 
Geodetic Survey in the Department of Com- 
merce, and living in Washington. 

Send that new address at once to the 
Alumnae Office. 



27 



Class of 1940 Reunion 

It was five years ago 

When the class of four-O 

Marched down the street 

In the early June heat 

Bearing a rose 

And twinkling our toes 

To the strains of a real live brass band. 

With what feelings of pride 

We grasped our sheep's hide 

With great sense of relief, 

And yet feeling of grief 

That finally this day 

We must go on our way 

And leave dear old Abbot Acad. 

We looked forward to not wearing stockings 

or hats, 
We looked forward to going on unrestrained 

bats, 
To smoking without first making furtive 

looks 
Or singing out loud "Seven-twenty in the 

books,' ' 
For such had been our wanton fad. 

But then we bethought us of Intervale, 

Of warming the radiator waiting for mail, 

Of Sunday night vespers, and morning 

chapel, 
And of the regular Friday night grapple, 
And sentiment entered our hearts. 

The thought, however, that cheered us up 

most, 
Was that in the future, Oh boy, what a host 
Of men would surround us 
(Some others since have happily found, as 
I did: calling hour beaux were best.) 

So we left And over 

When we'd made over 

Of the reins of state 

At the Abbot gate 

To the following class 

(Who were green as grass. 

To our mature way of thinking) . 

To our great surprise 

We now realize 

That the school carried on 

After we'd gone. 

As a matter of fact, 

And this isn't just tact, 

It really seems better than ever! 



So off we went each on her own merry way, 

Most off to college, some home to stay. 

We made some new friends, and influenced 

more people, 
And got ourselves hitched beneath the church 

steeple, 
And gradually grew five years older. 

All through this time 

There was one steady chime 

Of the bell of our past histories. 

It gave us the news 

And nostalgic blues — 

The Bulletin unravelled all mysteries. 

We know who's married who 

And the babes they've had too, 

And who has degrees 

And who collects fees 

From what lucrative job, 

With whom they hobnob, 

And so forth, and so forth, and so forth! 

We also have read with eager delight 
That Abbot became a more beautiful sight 
With a real face lifting and some brand new 

parts, 
To make a better atmosphere for absorbing 

the arts. 
But we still like to think of the good old days. 

And often the paths of two forties have 
crossed, 

And we've found that old friendships 
haven't been lost. 

And we've gossiped and talked and remi- 
nisced 

Till we've picked up the threads and gotten 
the gist 

Of all that has happened between. 

So now that we find some of us once again 

here, 
It doesn't seem the least bit unnatural or 

queer, 
Because I think that we all have found 
Wherever we are, we're Abbot bound. 

Jeanne Cowles Wilson, 1940, 

Reunion Chairman 

1941 

Christine Hill Winship's husband is serving 
aboard the USS North Carolina off Japan, 
part of the powerful Pacific fleet engaged in 
occupying Japan. 

Joan List has a position as Associate Editor 



28 



of "Miss America" magazine, and is living 
in New York City. 

Married: Harriet Kelly Means to Lt. John 
Raymond Kleiser on June 30, in Lebanon, 
Pa. Harriet graduated on May 28 from 
Randolph-Macon Women's College. 

Engaged: Jane Parrot to Arthur K. 
Brown, Jr. 

Married: Jane Towne to T-5 Richard W. 
Johnston USA, September 15. She expects 
to live in Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Married: Nancy Whittier to Ralph Massie 
Atchinson, USNR, September 9. 

Are you telling your friends about Abbot? 



1942 

Engaged: Irene Abbott to S/Sgt. Kenneth 
P. MacPherson. 

Engaged: Dorothy Barlow (aff. '42) to 
Lt. (j.g.) John Edward Gayton. 

Engaged: Mary Margaret Boynton to 
Ensign Robert C. MacPherson. 

Engaged: Charlotte Eaton (aff. '42), to 
Lt. Malcolm Southack Burr, USAAF. 

Engaged: Diantha Hamilton to Lt. Com. 
Joseph Matthem McDowell. 

Engaged: Louise Leslie to Lt. Harmon W. 
Hubbard, USAAF. Louise is attending the 
Longy School of Music. 

Engaged: Patricia Pierpont to Richard 
Whitaker Graves. 

Engaged: Ruth Rathbone to Lt. (j.g.) 
Edward Whitaker Hildreth. 

Margaret Sime spent some weeks teaching 
the three R's in a Prep, school in Scotland. 
This fall she expects to return to St. Andrews 
to continue studying for her degree in 
Physics. 

1943 

Married: Margaret Jacobus to Lt. (j.g.) 
John Ridgway Jaeckel, April 24, in New 
York City. 

Cynthia Lovely is a student nurse at the 
Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital in 
Hanover, New Hampshire. 



1944 

A recent letter from Patty Chandler tells 
of her marriage on May 19, to Trooper 
James A. Wilson, Royal Armoured Corps. 
After a few weeks in England her husband 
"went abroad to Ostend, and then went on 
to Germany where he has been for a month. 
I expect he will be home sometime in 
December as he is due to come out of the 
army about then, and I am hoping we shall 
be together for Christmas. 

The weather here is perfectly awful, 
typical of all the things you read about 
English weather. I suppose by the time this 
reaches you school will have started again. 
It really seems ages since I was at school 
myself. 

The shortages here are the same as ever 
and even more things are being rationed. It 
gets horribly monotonous at times, and I 
often wish I were back in the States where I 
could get all the things I wanted. At the 
moment I am spending a few days with my 
mother helping take care of the two babies, 
one of fifteen months, and the other almost 
two months. I can't imagine how she does 
it when she is alone.' ' 

Address: 55 Gloucester Crescent, 

Regents Park; London N.W. 1 ; England 

Elizabeth Frank has entered Russell Sage 
College. 

Married: Ruth Goodall to Virgil Ian 
Pitstick, Jr. in Sanford, Maine, August 18. 

Engaged: Shirley Harrison (aff. '44) to 
Walter C. Emmett. 

Married: Alva Houston to Lt. Richard 
Keith Davis on August 25, in Andover. Her 
attendants were all classmates, Betty Colson 
as maid of honor, Nancy Mclvor and Ruth 
Martin (aff. '44), as bridesmaids. 

Alma Mastrangelo received Freshman 
honors at Wellesley College. 

Send that new address at once to the 
Alumnae Office! 



29 




Ccurlesy Abbo\< 



'Do you think she's the college type?" 



The products 



The Class of 1945 



Barbara B. Ball, Smith 

Barbara Beecher, Wellesley 

Rosalie V. Benton, University of Colorado 

Josephine C. Bernardin, Vassar 

Martha A. Boynton, Wellesley 

Elizabeth W. Brown, Colby College 

Esther L. Bufferd, Sarah Lawrence 

Ann C. Bushnell, Barnard College 

Janet N. Craig, Garland School 

Elizabeth Dickerman, Mt. Holyoke 

Nancy Dodge, Pierce Secretarial School 

Ann Dorsel, Erskine Junior College 

Gretchen G. Fuller, Massachusetts School of Art 

Julia Gage, Bennett Junior College 

Elizabeth Graves, Barnard College 

Phyllis Hard on, Briar cliff Junior College 

Barbara Haserick, Archer & Elkins School of 
Photography 

Helen Hodges, Wellesley 

Mary Jane Hodges, Bryn Mawr 

Joan Holdsworth, New England Baptist Hos- 
pital 

Jean L. Jones, Smith 

Mary Jane Kurth, Mt. Holyoke 

Ruth Lazarus, Sargent College Physical Educa- 
tion 

Sally D. Leavitt, Radcliffe 



Suzanne Leland, Briar cliff Junior College 

Andree Luce, Wheaton 

Grace E. Lurton, Connecticut College 

Andrea Lyons, Goucher College 

Marion E. Marsh, Bennington College 

Marian C. Mclver, Wheaton 

Marjorie C. Milne, Br iarcliff Junior College 

Joan Mitchell, Finch Junior College 

Katharine Mulford, Briarcliff Junior College 

Jean Mulvey, Wellesley 

Helen Norris, University of New Hampshire 

Hilary Paterson, Vassar 

Patty Patton, Sweet briar 

Anne Marie Persson, Radcliffe 

Janet Redman, Vassar 

Molly Robbins, Katharine Gibbs, New York 

Nancy B. Selinger, Wells 

Cynthia H. Smith, Wellesley 

Shirley R. Sommer, Wellesley 

Sally M. Spear, Barnard 

Mary Lou Stegner, University of Michigan 

Nancy Stone ( '44) , Vassar 

Joan Sweeney, Bennett Junior College 

Mary J. Taylor, Briarcliff Junior College 

Madge M. Twomey, Radcliffe 

Beatrice Van Cleve, Colorado College 

Holly R. Welles, Smith 



30 



Epilogue 



From the hills we have brought you, oh Mountain Laurel, 
From the far away blue of the mountain's side, 
From the clear mountain air, oh Mountain Laurel, 
We have brought you hither with us to abide. 

Bring to us beauty, oh Mountain Laurel, 
A clear vision of heights unclouded by fear, 
That our lives may be strong, oh Mountain Laurel, 
As the mountains stand firm from year unto year. 

We plant you with purpose, oh Mountain Laurel, 
A symbol of how we would grow and have grown 
From our roots here at Abbot, oh Mountain Laurel, 
May they bind us forever, oh tree, like your own. 

Tree Song by Barbara Beegher 1945 



3 1 







UR NEWS IS YOUR NEWS 

AND YOUR NEWS IS OURS! 

WE SEND OURS HEREWITH 

AND HOPE SOON TO HAVE YOURS 



Name Glass 

Address Postal District Number 

Write news about yourself and others for the February Bulletin. Tear out 
and mail before January 10, to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, 
Andover, Mass. 



32 



btmt Arafcmu {Bulletin 



Jfabruaru, 1946 




;«;.,,, 






Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of American Alumni Council 



President 

Mrs. Rolfe M. Kennedy 
(Roberta Kendall) 
255 Park Lane 
Douglaston, N. Y. 

Vice-presidents 

Mrs. Frank C. D'Elseaux 

(Virginia Gay) 
9 Lawrence Street 
Winchester, Mass. 

Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
50 Windsor Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
8 Carisbrooke Street 
Andover, Mass. 



OFFICERS, 1 944- 1 946 

Clerk 
Mrs. Edwin H. Goodwin 
(Susan Hildreth) 
371 Highland Avenue 
Winchester, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. James E. Downs 
(Laura Cheever) 
Bancroft Road 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 
Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
5 Morton Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 
Miss Marion McPherson 
3^ Summer Street 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 

I942-I94 8 i945~ I 95i 

Miss Margaret Van Voorhis Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 

304 Lexington Avenue (Helen Allen) 

New York City, N. Y. 246 Glen Road 

Weston 93, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 

Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
50 Windsor Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. J. Allen Lind 

(Mary Simpson) 
1239 As bury Avenue 
Winnetka, 111. 

CONNECTICUT 

Miss Sara G. Peck 
20 Fairview Terrace 
Derby, Conn. 

DETROIT 

Mrs. Thomas Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
1 2 1 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Mich. 

MAINE, EASTERN 

Miss Eleanor Bird 
250 Broadway 
Rockland, Maine 



MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Harold Robinson 
(Harriette Woolverton) 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

NEW YORK 
Miss Gertrude E. Holbrook 
Stonecrest Apartments 
Larchmont, N. Y. 

OHIO CENTRAL 
Mrs. Paul Meek 
(Louise Norpell) 
Worthington, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 

Mrs. George Worthington 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 

Mrs. A. Scudder Moore 
(Ruth Murray) 
96 South Elm Street 
West Bridgewater, Mass. 

PITTSBURGH 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
515 North McKean Street 
Butler, Pa. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 13 



FEBRUARY, 1946 



Issue 2 



Table of Contents 



page 



Frontispiece: The Rebekah M. Chickering Leisure Reading Room 

What is Remedial Reading? .... Jane Sullivan 1931 

Alumnae Interests: 

The Human Engineering Laboratory . . Lois Kimball 192J 
How to Conquer War Sydna White 1927 

Charlotte Gowing Cooper ign 



My Austral War 

Mary Ethel Bancroft . 

School Events . 

Abbot Alumnae Association 

Glass Reunion Chairmen 

In Memoriam 

Abbot Clubs 

Class News 

Record of War Service 



M.B.R 



5 
6 



7 

9 
10 

1 1 

12 

12 

13 
14 

Back cover 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

JANE B. CARPENTER, 1892, honorary 

CONSTANCE PARKER CHIPMAN, 1906, Editor in Chief 

marion r. Mcpherson, 1918 

ROBERTA KENDALL KENNEDY, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 




THE REBEKAH M. CHICKERING LEISURE READING ROOM 



What Is Remedial Reading! 



7 



Jane Sullivan, 1931 




R 



EADING is a much more complicated process 
than is generally realized. One authority states 
that mature reading involves nearly one hundred 
different skills. Some of these skills are mechanical, 
some are intellectual. These numerous skills are de- 
veloped progressively from the first grade through 
college. Whenever the development of one of these 
skills is inadequate, the student falls behind in his 
reading, and it is the task of the remedial teacher to 
correct the trouble. Remedial Reading is therefore 
exactly what the term implies: remedying and elimin- 
ating poor reading habits. 

Until the last fifteen years the teaching of reading 
was considered a problem of the elementary school. 
It was assumed that any child who had completed the 
eighth grade was able to read. It is true that basic 
routine habits have usually been established in the 
elementary grades. However, numerous reading in- 
vestigations have indicated that an unnecessarily 
large number of secondary school pupils read so poorly that they do not 
profit sufficiently from the printed materials presented in their courses. It is 
to assist pupils to correct their difficulties, develop the necessary reading 
skills, and adjust their reading to the variable demands of their courses that 
remedial reading courses have been inaugurated in secondary schools and 
colleges. 

A remedial or corrective program at the secondary school level includes 
the development and improvement of the following skills : 



Jane Sullivan, Abbot 
1 93 1, Wheaton Col- 
lege 1935, received 
her Ed.M. from Boston 
University, majoring 
i n psychology and 
reading disabilities. 
She now teaches Re- 
medial Reading at 
Abbot. 



I. Silent and Oral Reading. 

This includes the mechanics and speed of reading. 
II. Vocabulary Enrichment. 

This includes word recognition and word meaning. 

III. Spelling. 

This includes the study of rules as well as a study of pho- 
netic and non-phonetic words. 

IV. Thorough- type Reading. 

This includes such skills as following directions, selections 
of main ideas and details, location of information, 
systematic note-taking, and the organization of material 
in outline, summary or precis form. 



V. Associational Reading 

This includes exercising judgment while reading, 
drawing inferences and conclusions from material, 
and evaluating material. 

VI. Methods of Study. 

This includes means of improving concentration and 
the ability to memorize, organization of study plans, 
and actual practice in ways to study each subject in the 
curriculum. 

At Abbot the students are selected for the remedial or study skills 
classes on the basis of tests administered in the Fall to each new student. 
Teachers' recommendations are also used as a basis for selection. The pupils 
are placed in groups according to their specific needs. If the reading problem 
is a serious one, the student receives individual assistance in overcoming her 
difficulty. As soon as her performance warrants it, the student is dropped 
from the classes. 

There is not space enough to discuss the techniques used in developing 
all the reading skills taught at the secondary school level. For this reason I 
shall discuss in detail only one aspect of the remedial program at Abbot — 
the technique used in improving rate of reading. The Harvard Reading 
Films are used for this purpose. The motion picture technique which is em- 
ployed in these films was developed at the Psycho-Educational Clinic of the 
Harvard Graduate School of Education. The purpose of the films is to in- 
crease rate of reading by enlarging the recognition span (the number of 
words read in one pause) and by establishing the habit of reading in a regular 
sequence of pauses from left to right. 

The films project phrases or sections of the lines of print across and down 
the screen according to the patterns of the pauses of the skilled reader. The 
length of the phrases is varied according to the difficulty of the selection. 
The material is presented as black words on a white background thus re- 
taining similarity to the printed page. The phrases are presented in units 
which disappear as soon as the next unit appears. This makes the films real 
"pacing" devices which carry along the slow readers. Many who read slowly 
make no attempt to speed up their reading under normal conditions because 
they are afraid they will miss something. With the films they are forced to 
increase speed because they realize they will miss all if they fall behind. 

It is obvious that rapid reading without comprehension has no value. 
Therefore a comprehension check follows the presentation of each film. In 
order to provide the student with an immediate opportunity to transfer the 
film reading practice to a normal reading situation, a timed reading selection 
with comprehension check is presented after each film. A graphic record is 
kept of the student's achievement in terms of speed and comprehension. 

Of course, rate of reading varies with the purpose for which the material 
is being read. One would not read a newspaper at the same speed one would 
study a treatise in philosophy. However, it is generally agreed that for ordin- 



ary purposes of study a rate of at least 300 words per minute with good com- 
prehension is necessary. The reading films have been very successful in helping 
students to attain this speed. By checking at intervals following the comple- 
tion of the course, it has been found that the gains achieved during the course 
have been retained. During the course one student's rate increased from 153 
words per minute with 30% comprehension to 310 words per minute witb 
90% comprehension. When tested one year later her rate and comprehension 
remained the same. 

Why don't you check your rate and see whether you are an efficient 
reader? If you are below the accepted standard perhaps you would like to 
return to Abbot and join one of our groups! 



Alumnae Interests 



THE HUMAN ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

Lois Kimball, Abbot 1927 

THE Human Engineering Laboratory presents a tremendously challeng- 
ing work. It is experimenting continuously, developing a new science of 
measuring aptitudes, endeavoring to help its examinees think for themselves 
more clearly in planning education or careers so that they may make the 
most of their most strongly indicated aptitudes. We are continually seeking 
measurements for more than the eighteen aptitudes now being included in 
the program of testing. Some of us are designing new tests which is fascinating 
work, though perhaps only one of many attempts may prove itself valuable. 

Examinees come to the Laboratory voluntarily, usually with the desire 
to clarify their own thinking. Now perhaps eighty-five percent are returning 
veterans who are planning for further education and worthwhile careers. 
Most of them hear of us through fellow servicemen who have found the tests 
helpful. 

Did you know that in the survey made of schools and colleges by the 
Laboratory that Abbot is recommended for the student who has high clerical 
facility, or, in our terms, high accounting aptitude and also who has gained a 
high vocabulary rating in our test for knowledge of general vocabulary? 
High accounting aptitude enables a student to cope with paper and pencil 
work easily — more easily than those who score low — generally to read at 
a better pace (and this includes the ability to read sheet music for piano). 
We feel that the higher these two scores, the more readily the student accepts 
and enjoys the challenge of the courses offered by the larger and oldest 
schools and colleges. The less outstanding these two are, a school which is 
correspondingly smaller, and with low vocabulary, may afford a fairer bal- 
ance; probably this student would be somewhat lost and handicapped by 
having to devote so much effort and time to clearing away the written and 
reading assignments that she would have little chance for the fullness of the 
academic, plus extracurricula activities. 



The following books, explaining aptitudes more in detail would be inter- 
esting additions for a home library. "Aptitudes and Languages", "The Too 
Many Aptitude Woman", "Ideaphoria", (coined word for flow of ideas), 
"Unsolved Business Problems." 

HOW TO CONQUER WAR 

Sydna White, Abbot 1927 

WHILE I was at Abbot, the "Academics" had a one-term course on 
psychology with Miss Bailey. The text book was William James' Ele- 
mentary Psychology. One little point that has stood by me ever since then 
was Mr. James's explanation of what happened to you if you went to the 
theatre, for instance, and were moved to tears about the awful injustice done 
to the under-dogs, and then came out and did nothing about the under-dogs. 
The theory was that if one were emotionally moved and then failed to follow 
up with action based on one's reasoning about the situation causing the 
emotion, one became less sensitive and soon hardened and incapable of action. 

I believe Professor James must also have said somewhere that an ac- 
cumulation of such emotional upheavals unaccompanied by action may 
eventually result in an explosion smashing one's inhibitions and causing 
violent action. Things do happen to people. Some just petrify, some blow up. 
You may get some positive help out of the blower-upper, but it's apt to be 
hard to handle and come too late to do much good. 

As Abbot women can belong to neither of these horrid classes, I am im- 
pelled to bring the following subject matter to their attention. Abbot women 
are cold with rage at the developments that brought on the last war and will 
bring on the next, if something doesn't happen to prevent it. And Abbot 
women want to take action about that something to prevent it. 

Clifton Fadiman expressed it this way: "Something causes Peace. It. is 
Government. Something will cause World Peace. It is World Government." 

If you want to work for world government, and don't know how, here's 
one channel for your labor. A year ago a filmstrip called "How to Conquer 
War," presenting the argument for world government, was put on the 
market by "Federalist Films." If you want to vent some of your feeling 
about this prospect of warfare, atomic or otherwise, use your telephone and 
find out whether any of your local organizations have shown the film. Then 
write me immediately! 

The fact is that public opinion is the only force that can bring about 
world government, and this filmstrip, as the only visual presentation of the 
argument, is one valuable tool for shaping that force. The film points out 
(after covering historical examples of peace-unit developments from the 
beginning of time, including the League of Nations), those powers that must 
be given to the United Nations Organization if it is to become the organiza- 
tion we must have to ensure peace. 

Mark Van Doren says of the film, "Now — not tomorrow, is the time for 
all people to see this film." 



My Austral War 

Charlotte Gowing Cooper, Abbot 191 1 
Chief Arts Crafts Section for South West Pacific 

THE land down under where even the outline of the continent resembles 
the United States upside down is known to the pilgrims from America 
as the place where everything is in reverse. Winter is summer and summer is 
winter, the farther south you go the colder it gets, the less said about the 
climate as you go north the better! 

To give a resume of two years spent in northern Queensland, Australia, 
and Dutch New Guinea necessitates condensation and a selective approach. 
While there everyone talked of their prospective books but it is problematical 
how many will actually materialize. Mine was to be called "Under The 
Double Southern Cross," or some such play on words or arrangement there- 
of! And here are some of the chapter titles. 

"Red Roofs and Stained Glass," to be the impression of native archi- 
tecture, — the houses built on piles with hot looking roofs and their many 
small windows outlined in rectangular panes of yellow and green colored 
glass. 

"Septics and Syphoning Syphonias," a septic being an inside toilet — 
quite a rarity until the Americans brought their own plumbing. The local 
products' trade name was "Syphonia." If you were knowing you would give 




Mrs. Cooper at the Crafts Training Center, Brisbane, Queensland 



a quick yank and leap away from the resultant violent gushing. Australia 
has beautiful waterfalls but this type is not written up in the travelogues ! 

"Riding the Rails" was to be the experiences of train travel going north, 
the gauges getting narrower and narrower, and the speed slower and slower. 
But read the book "Care of Postmaster, San Francisco" which will give you a 
picture both amusing and true of an American's reaction to local customs. 

The titles go on and on as my own vicissitudes directed. 

As for my own personal activities, directing clubs in Australia, involved 
creating an American atmosphere and serving American food — and that 
was no mean triumph, which involved translating our terminology into 
local parlance and vice-versa. For instance, if you wanted "Brown Betty," 
you described the ingredients and method of making. The chef says "Oh — 
that's 'Apple Charlotte'." So, at first try, you end by getting "Apple Char- 
lotte" which is apple sauce with bread crumbs mushed into it. After a few 
tries you realize that you have to make a sample, play by play, and taste by 
taste! One chapter was to be "Quivering Desserts." For the local custom was 
to serve a one-in- three dessert, one molehill of jello, one of custard, one of cut 
up fruit, known there as "fruit salad" whether served as a compote, a salad or 
as part of a dessert. 

Needless to say I was glad to terminate my struggles with food, faminous 
appetites and flying ants and return to my own bailiwick of the arts and 
crafts. As the Chief of the Arts and Crafts Section for the Southwest Pacific, 
the job entailed getting together a staff of technical assistants, American and 
Australian, of organizing material to cover procedures, procurement, pro- 
fessional standards, technical handbooks on native art using their primitive 
origin as inspiration for designs and patterns, to be used in the diversional 
craft program in clubs and hospitals. 

As Headquarters moved forward, the staff moved on nearer and nearer 
to the Equator, I to Hollandia, N.E.I., where life was far different to that on 
the Mainland. And that is a chapter in itself. All women lived in a stockade 
Dr compound under M.P. Guard, wore slacks or trousers — never a skirt to 
be seen except in the movies or an occasional U.S.O. show, My tentmates and 
I called our particular area "Tobacco Row," the three of us nicknamed 
"Leater," "Jeater" and "Neater." 

Travel was under Army orders and either by troop ship or Army plane. 
Unless it's been experienced, words fail to give an adequate picture, — get- 
ting up in the middle of the night, most often in a downpour, struggling 
with a valpack and musette bag — bumping to an airstrip by truck or jeep, 
waiting in the tropical morning chill as the planes zoomed in and out, watch- 
ing the play of lights and the sunset-like dawn dim out the brilliant morning 
stars. An exciting thrill viewed from the home front, but to live through, an 
experience comparable to the proverbial dishwashing! 

And the things I missed most — hot water — ■ privacy — olives, and just 
plain American crackers. But what I missed the very most was the North 
Star, though the upside down dipper offered an occasional nostalgic thrill. 

8 



MARY ETHEL BANCROFT 

i 882-1 945 

Many generations of Abbot girls must have been startled by the 
news of Miss Bancroft's death on December 14, just as she was 
entering Symphony Hall for her beloved Friday afternoon concert. 
Her connections with Abbot began many years ago, when as the 
young daughter of "Banty", the much loved principal of Phillips 
Academy, she came to Abbot as a day scholar. She graduated in 
1900 and after four years at Smith College was soon asked to come 
back to Abbot as teacher of English. There she taught from 1 908 to 
1934. So her life was bound up even from her birth with the school 
life of Andover. 

Her friendships at Abbot particularly with her fellow teachers, 
made an important element in her life and continued even after 
she left the school. She spent her summers in a fine old homestead 
that she owned in Mont Vernon, N. H., where she was able to show 
the hospitality that flowed so happily from her cheerful spirit. She 
took what pleasures there were about her, from books, nature and 
friends, and good thoughts and especially from music, in which she 
took such delight, that no one in the town was more faithful than she 
at the "Friday Symphony." For many years her brother Cecil ac- 
companied her regularly to those concerts, and after his death she 
was one of a little group of Andover music-lovers who met at the 
concert every week. So there was a certain fitness in her dying at 
Symphony Hall just before the concert on December 14, before old 
age or disabling sickness touched her, and while she could enjoy 
the lovely things she accepted as her happy portion. 

So in spite of loneliness she made for herself and her friends a 
cheerful life that touched a large circle, where she was universally 
liked and esteemed. Her modesty was as marked as her cheerfulness 
and clear good sense. It was a pleasure to meet her or even to hear 
her pleasant voice over the telephone. Andover will miss her, where 
her friendly spirit was never downcast even in the midst of war and 
desolation. 

She left few relatives. Dr. Alfred Stearns until recently principal 
of Phillips Academy was her cousin. A nephew and two nieces 
survive her. But her home was in Andover with her chief interest 
her long connection with Abbot Academy. She will not be forgotten 
there among the line of noble and gifted women who have given 
their best to the school. 

M.B.R. 



School Events 



Saturday January 12, Lecture by Dr. Charlotte Whitton on "Tomorrow's 
Women in Today's World" 

Sunday January 13 Vespers: The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, Minister, 
Phillips Academy 

Saturday January ig, Joan and Betty Rayner, Troubadours 

Sunday January 20, Vespers: The Reverend Harold B. Sedgewick, Brookline 

Wednesday January 23, Open Forum Meeting on "The Atomic Bomb" con- 
ducted by the Student Forum group 

Sunday January 27, The Reverend Roy L. Minich, D.D., Maiden 

February 1 -February 5, Mid-Year examinations 

Sunday February 3, Vespers : Hymn Sing 

February 5-7 — Seniors at Intervale 

Saturday February g, Mile. Germaine Arosa, Diseuse; Recital of Fables and 
Monologues 

Sunday February 10, The Reverend Arnold Kenseth, Bible Teacher at Abbot 

Saturday February 16, Students' Recital 

Sunday February 17, Vespers: The Reverend Charles W. Havice, Ph.D., 
Professor of Sociology, Dean of Chapel, Northeastern University 

Sunday February 24, Vespers : The Andover Male Choir 

Saturday March 2, Natural Color Motion Picture Lecture on American Birds 
and Big Game by Cleveland P. Grant 

Sunday March 3, Students' Recital 

Saturday March g, Senior and Senior-Mid Promenade 

Sunday March 10, Vespers: Dr. Eddy Asirvatham, Head of the Department of 
Political Science and Public Administration at the University of Madras, 
now Visiting Professor of Missions and Christian International Relations 
at Boston University 

Saturday March 16, Senior Play: "Friend Hannah" by Paul Kester 

Sunday March 17, Vespers : Abbot Christian Association 

March ig- April 2, Spring Vacation 

Important Spring Events 
Saturday April 13, Piano Recital by Kate Friskin and James Friskin 
Friday and Saturday, April 26 and 27 , The Gilbert and Sullivan opera "Iolanthe" 

presented by students of Abbot and Phillips at Phillips Academy 
Saturday May 4, Abbot Birthday Bazaar 

THE JOHN ESTHER ART GALLERY 

Curator: W. Abbott Cheever 
Exhibitions 

January 16- March 1, Travel Posters by European and American artists, loaned 
by Mrs. Francis P. McClellan 

March 1 -April /, Paintings and drawings by W. Abbott Cheever 

April i-May 1, Tentative; Collection of water colours, owned by the Interna- 
tional Business Machine Corp. representative of western hemisphere. 

May 16-June 10, Abbot student exhibition. 

10 



The Abbot Alumnae Association 

i8yi-ig46 

The Alumnae Association greets you in this new year of 1 946, an especial- 
ly important one, as the Association will celebrate in June the seventy-fifth 
anniversary of its founding in 1871 . This celebration will take place on Alum- 
nae Day, June 8, at a luncheon, to which all alumnae, those holding class 
reunions and those in the between years are cordially invited. Special de- 
tailed notices will follow later with the full Commencement program and 
applications for luncheon and room reservations attached. 

Commencement dates will be June seventh to June tenth; alumnae are 
urged to start planning now! The annual meeting will be held at 1 1 .30 in the 
morning, so arrange to arrive early and spend a full day. 

Mid-Winter Meeting of the Alumnae Association and Boston Abbot Club 

A buffet dinner meeting will take place on Tuesday, March 12, at 6.30 
p.m., at the College Club, Boston. The guests of honour and speakers will be 
Miss Marguerite Hearsey, and Dr. Sidney Lovett, Chaplain of Yale Uni- 
versity, and Chairman of the World Student Service Fund. Subject: "Salvag- 
ing Youth and Education in Europe." Dr. Lovett will speak from personal 
observation in Europe last fall. 

"Iolanthe" 

The Gilbert and Sullivan opera "Iolanthe", will be presented by stu- 
dents of Abbot and Phillips on the evenings of Friday, April 26 and Saturday 
April 27 (note correction from Miss Hearsey's letter) at George Washing- 
ton Hall, Phillips Academy. Any interested alumnae may order tickets after 
the first of April through the Ticket Office, Phillips Academy. 

The Alumnae Office 

District 1 of the American Alumni Council held its annual meeting at 
the Exeter Inn, Exeter, N. H., from January 10 to 12. Miss Marion McPher- 
son attended the session pertaining to alumnae funds, and general office 
problems. Mrs. Chipman attended the session on alumnae publications. 

Senior Coffee Party 

On Saturday, January 19, the senior class was invited to become ac- 
quainted with the alumnae office. They were shown old photographs and 
class books, the functions of the stencil and addressograph machines were 
demonstrated, the personal and address files were explained, with special 
emphasis on the importance of always keeping in touch with the office by 
means of informing the office of changes of names and addresses. Coffee 
and doughnuts were served. 

11 



Class Reunion Chairmen 

1886 Harriet Raymond Brosnan (Mrs. John B.) 70 Arlington St., Haverhill 
1 89 1 Annie Bull Hardenbergh (Mrs. Daniel B.) 7 Orchard St., Middletown 
N. Y. ' 

1896 Lillian Franklin Garr (Mrs. Ernest L.) 34 Russell St., Milton 
1 90 1 Evelyn Garter Giles (Mrs. Howard) South Woodstock, Vermont 
1906 Ruth Adams Downer (Mrs. Guy W.) 8 Warren Court, Shelburne Falls 
191 1 Dorothy Bigelow Arms (Mrs. Clarence) 12 Beechmont St., Worcester 
1916 Esther Kilton, 112 Charles St., Boston 14; Eugenia Parker, Denmark, 
Maine 

1 92 1 Marion Kimball Bigelow (Mrs. David H.) 326 Highland St., West 

Newton 
1926 M. Alice Perry, 175 Florida St., Springfield 

1931 Doris Allen Carroll (Mrs. Edward R.), 31 High St., Marblehead 
1936 Anne Russell Loring (Mrs. Malcolm B.) 500 Chester Ave., Moores- 

town, N. J. 

1941 Sue Long Kremer (Mrs. Frederick S.) 1 1 72 Park Ave., New York Gitv 
28,N.Y. y 

1945 Hilary Paterson, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Alumnae Day Committees 

Chairman of nominating committee for the Alumnae Association: Mrs. 
Helen Abbott Allen; Chairman of the 75th Anniversary luncheon reserva- 
tions, Mrs. Marion Mellor Dean; Chairman of flowers and decorations, Mrs. 
Ruth Clark Weaver. 



In Memoriam 



1870 

Georgia Ray died in 1945. 

1877 

Cora P. Graves died in 1 944. 

1881 

Anna Hunter, widow of John Bracewell, 
died September 29, 1945. 

1885 

Alice M. Clement died December 10, 1945. 

1887 

Mary Bill, widow of Elmer H. Bright, 
died suddenly December 25, 1945. She 
leaves two sons, Horace O. Bright and 
Alexander H. Bright, a daughter Mrs. 
Walter W. Weld, and four grandchildren. 



1888 

Mary Carter died May 12, 1944. 

1895 

Emily Richards died December 17, 1945. 

1896 

Mary Lindenberg died November 2, 1945. 

1900 

Mary E. Bancroft died suddenly De- 
cember 14, 1945. (see page 9) 

1924 

Elisabeth Barss, wife of Roger R. Eastman 
died January 4. Besides her husband she 
leaves a seven year old daughter. 



12 



Abbot Clubs 



BOSTON (1892): President, Mrs. Gwen- 
dolyn Bloomfield Tillson '22; Vice-presidents, 
Mrs. Virginia Gay d'Elseaux '28; Mrs. 
Elizabeth Sage Batchelder '33; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. Louise Risley Floyd '37; 
Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Marion Conant 
Ireland '27; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Nay 
Gramkow '27; Auditor, Mrs. Mary Piper 
Sears '28; Program Chairman, Mrs. Faith 
Chipman Parker '31; Directors 1944- 1946, 
Mrs. Katharine Allen Babson '31, Mrs. 
Martha Ransom Tucker '37, Miss Priscilla 
Richards '31. Directors 1945- 1947, Mrs. 
Lydia Kunkel Eldredge '21, Miss Irene 
Atwood '18, Mrs. Ruth Baker Johnson '30. 

The Alumnae Association and the Boston 
Abbot Club will renew their joint midwinter 
meeting at a buffet dinner, Tuesday, March 

12, at 6.30 p.m. at the College Club, Boston. 
Speakers will be Miss Marguerite Hearsey 
and Dr. Sidney Lovett, Chaplain of Yale 
University, and Chairman of the World 
Student Sendee Fund. Subject: "Salvaging 
Youth and Education in Europe." Dr. 
Lovett will speak from personal observation 
in Europe last fall. 

Reservation chairman: Mrs. Lydia Kunkel 
Eldredge, 126 Pleasant St., Newton Center. 

The annual spring meeting of the Boston 
Abbot Club will be held on Saturday, April 

13, at 2 p.m. at the College Club. Dessert- 
coffee and social period will be followed by 
the speaker. 

Alumnae are cordially invited to attend 
these meetings, and urged to save the dates 
now. 

CHICAGO (1921): President, Mrs. J. 
Allen Lind (Mary Simpson); Secretary, Mrs. 
Edith Bullen Creeden, 461 Hill Rd., Win- 
netka; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Hall Walker. 

CONNECTICUT (1923): President, Miss 
Sara Peck, 20 Fairview Ter., Derby; Secre- 
tary- Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Lawton'Cheney, 
36 Morse St., Hamden. 

DETROIT (1922): PresUent, Mrs. Thom- 
as Nalle (Harriet Balfe), 121 1 Willow Lane, 
Birmingham. 



MAINE, EASTERN (1926): President, 
Miss Eleanor Bird, 250 Broadway, Rockland; 
Vice-president, Mrs. Frances McDougall Mc- 
Loon; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Annetta 
Richards Bryant, Round Pond. 

MAINE, WESTERN (1922): President, 
Mrs. Harold Robinson (Harriette Woolver- 
ton), Cape Elizabeth; Treasurer, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Baldwin Frohock. 

NEW YORK (1898): President, Miss 
Gertrude Holbrook '25; Vice-presidents, Mrs. 
Laura Scudder Williamson '24, Mrs. Helga 
Lundin Buttrick '23; Recording Secretary, Mrs. 
Grace Leyser Boynton '19; Corresponding 
Secretary, Mrs. Jane Owsley Warwick '30; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Ruth Cann Baker '31; 
Directors, Mrs. Helen Bradley Hodgkinson 
'19, Mrs. Eunice Meigs Pease '21, Mrs. 
Ethel Thompson James '24. 

The spring meeting of the New York 
Abbot Club will be held on Saturday, 
March 23, at the Hotel Lombardy. Follow- 
ing the luncheon Miss Kate Friskin will give 
a piano recital. New York and New Jersey 
alumnae are cordially invited to attend. 
Write the president, Miss Gertrude E. Hol- 
brook, Stonecrest Apts., Larchmont, N. Y. 
for your reservation. 

OHIO, CENTRAL (1921): President, 
Secretary, Mrs. Paul Meek (Louise Norpell), 
5600 Meek Rd., Worthington. 

OHIO, CLEVELAND (1927): President, 
Mrs. George Worthington (Madeleine Fiske) , 
Chesterland, Ohio. 

OLD COLONY (1924): President, Mrs. 
Ruth Murray Moore; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Mrs. Martha Wind Finger. 

PITTSBURGH (1921): President, Mrs. 
George H. Jackson (Gertrude Miller), But- 
ler, Pa.; Secretary, Mrs. Joseph M. Browne 
(Eliza Atwell), 529 Pine Rd., Sewickley. 



13 



Class News 



1874-1890 

Class Funds Secretary: Mrs. Ernest C. 
Young (Ruth Childs) 6 Emerson St., Brook- 
line. 

1884 

Fanny Hardy Eckstorm has presented 
two of her books for the Alumnae bookshelf 
in the library; "The Penobscot Man," and 
Minstrelsy of Maine." The school has 
added her recent publication, "Old John 
Neptune and Other Maine Shamans." 

1886 

Sixtieth Reunion 

Nine members from a class of eighteen 
hope to attend their 6oth reunion. It will be 
a real celebration! 

Harriet Raymond Brosnan 

Reunion Chairman 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frank W. 

Darling (Mary Gorton) Hampton, Virginia. 

1890 

We gladly record more of '90's grand- 
children. Adeline Perry Walder passed on 
five years ago. Her husband, Dr. Harold 
Walker, is still in splendid health, and there 
were three children. The oldest daughter 
Mrs. Merritt H. Taylor of Philadelphia, has 
had two sons in the armed forces in Europe, 
both fliers. 

Two other grandchildren, a boy of four- 
teen and a girl of twelve, are children of 
the daughter Eleanor who is the wife of Dr. 
Francis Lee Weille. 

The third daughter, Doris, has two little 
children, a boy and a girl. She is Mrs. F. 
George Pritchard, and lives in Conn. 

"Doesn't someone know if there are any 
grandchildren of Olive Wheaton? 

1891 
Fifty-fifth Reunion 

In June '91 fifty- five years seemed years 
away, far in the distance. We have arrived 
and June, 1946, will be our fifty-fifth re- 
union. Will each one try to be present 
Alumnae Day, June 8? 

Annie Bull Hardenbergh 

Reunion Chairman 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Daniel B. 
Hardenbergh (Annie Bull) 7 Orchard St., 
Middletown, N. Y. 



1892 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane B. Car- 
penter, School St., Andover. 

1893 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Harry R. 
Miles (Anna Nettleton) 4 Rock Ledge Drive, 
Stamford, Conn. 

1894 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Doremus 
Scudder (Mabel Bosher) 133 West Ninth 
St., Claremont, California. 

Fred E. Dennen, husband of Annie 
Strout, died October 20, 1945 in Limington, 
Maine. 

1896 
Fiftieth Reunion 

Greetings to Abbot "Ninety-six" ! Are you 
all coming back to Andover in June? This is 
a reminder. Those of us nearby are making 
plans for your entertainment, making our 
fiftieth anniversary a happy reunion. We 
have sixteen members on our list and do 
hope it will be possible to have you all here. 
Now the war is over the dates are later and 
Commencement is in June again. What 
could be lovelier than Andover in June! 

Lillian Franklin Carr, President 
Reunion Chairman 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Henry V. 
Conant (Ruth Loring) 914 High St., Ded- 
ham. 

1897 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Alexander 
Bunce (Gertrude Ware) R.F.D. 1, Rock- 
ville, Conn. 

Mrs. Eben A. Baldwin, mother of Helene 
Baldwin Burdick, died December 26, 1945, 
in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1898 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert W. 
Dunbar (Selina Cook) 3 Elk St., Apt. 7, 
Albany, N. Y. 

1900 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur P. 
Spear (Grace Chapman) 156 Winchester 
St., Brookline. 

Col. Walter Huston Lillard, husband of 
Ethel Hazen, is in Germany doing field 
work for the Intergovernmental Committee 
on refugees. 



H 



1901 
Forty-fifth Reunion 

Dear nineteen-one class-mates, this is the 

time; 
Let's hie us to Andover, when it comes June. 
Tho' glance retrospective shows years forty- 
five, 
I'm sure we can show them we're still much 

alive. 
While Abbot herself, progressing always, 
Is bound to elicit our wonder and praise. 

Evelyn Carter Giles 

Reunion Chairman 
Dr. J. A. Cushman, husband of Frieda 
Billings, received the Hayden Gold Medal in 
Geology from the Academy of Natural 
Sciences, in Philadelphia, on Dec. 15. He 
received the honor for his authoritative book 
on the study of the fossils of microscopic sea 
animals. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Helen Hale, 
86 Knox St., Lawrence. 

1902 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Hezekiah 
Poore (Mildred Mooers), 37 Ames St., 
Lawrence. 

1903 

Married: Elinor Barta to Clement W. 
Orr, January 19. They will live in the Daniel 
Webster Birthplace in Franklin, N. H. 

1904 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. William O. 
Pettit (Elizabeth Winsor), 186 Livingston 
Ave., Brunswick, N. J. 

Ruth Lane Treadway writes of the birth 
of a son Robert Oakley Abbott 3rd to her 
daughter Ellen Treadway Abbott, on Sep- 
tember 21, 1945. The husband of her daugh- 
ter Mary, Lt. (sg) Henry S. Washburn, is 
"presumed to have died July 1942 in the 
battle of Kula Gulf, attached to the Light 
Cruiser Helena." 

Janet Giese, daughter of Emily Stearns 
Giese was married to Julian Elwin Oyaas, 
in December, 1945. 

1906 
Fortieth Reunion 

Come on Girls! Tho' some of us are grand- 
mothers we'll show there's great vitality in 
all of us, especially in our devotion to each 
other and the school. June 8 is the day! 

Ruth Adams Downer 

Reunion Chairman 



Ruth Adams Downer reports that her 
daughter Sylvia is out of the Marines, and 
her son Alton is still in the Pacific, expected 
home in the spring. 

Constance Parker Chipman has a total of 
nine grandchildren. October 22, a second 
son and fourth child, John Chipman Fernie, 
was born to her daughter, Constance Chip- 
man Fernie, and on December 17, a first 
son, and third child, Reeve Chipman Parker 
was born to Faith Chipman Parker, Abbot '31. 

Rena Porter Hastings has a new grand- 
daughter, Janet, born to her son, Hudson 
Hastings Jr., on August 17, 1945- Her 
youngest daughter, Amy, has a position as 
Occupational Therapist in a private hos- 
pital. 

1907 

Margaret Hall Walker's son, Robert Hall, 
was married to Marguerite Elizabeth 
Wachs, June 13, 1945. 

1908 

Helen Chaffee Manville announces the 
arrival of two granddaughters; Carol Lynn 
born in May to her daughter, Mrs. Carline 
Osborne Walker, whose husband Ensign 
Walker received his honorable discharge in 
December. Peggy Jo was born in June to 
her son Lt. E. Perry Manville Jr. Lt. Man- 
ville has been made Flight Commander in 
the Air Force, having re-enlisted in the Navy. 

Esther Parker Lovett's husband, Sidney 
Lovett, Chaplain of Yale, spent the fall 
months in Europe in the interests of the 
World Student Service Fund, of which he is 
Chairman. He interviewed many professors 
and students of universities whose buildings 
were in ruins, and equipment lost, but whose 
spirit for recovery was courageous. He is 
now reporting to the schools and colleges 
in this country who are supporting this 
vital work of salvaging education in Europe. 



It's time to enter your granddaughters in 
Abbot for 1947. 

1909 

Mary Bourne Boutwell writes, "I had the 
most delightful call with Laura Jackson 
Austin 1 910, in October. We hadn't seen 
each other for twenty years and more. I saw 
the pictures of her three sons and their 
families and the three grandchildren. 
Laura has a home in Coronado but has 



15 



been with her mother on their farm in 
southern Michigan. 

"My family is much depleted. Our son-in- 
law returned from Germany and was dis- 
charged, he and Suzette hope to be in New 
York." 

1910 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Myron G. 
Darby (Ethel Reigeluth), no Tanglewylde 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Married: Dorothy Renwick to Edmund 
Clarence Gosling, November 13, 1944. 

1911 
Thirty-fifth Reunion 

Coming Up! Sunny Side Up, too! Our 
35th reunion at Abbot. Do me a favor. Get 
out your 191 1 Classbook (I did). Look 
through it. 

Do you think Maud still looks as sober as 
that? 
(No she doesn't, because I have just seen her) 

Ts Rebecca as handsome as ever? (Yes) 

Do Kathy's eyes shine and twinkle the 
same? (I'm sure of it). 

Is Mary Hall as tiny as ever? 
That only covers the Class Officers of 191 1 
but it brought up a million questions such 
as Perk's pompadour, Rhoda's singing etc. 
!!Warning!! We'll talk about you if you don't 
come! So for self protection COME! 

Dorothy Bigelow Arms 

Reunion Chairman 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Douglas 
Donald (Edith Johnson), 8 Carisbrooke 
St., Andover. 

1913 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Margaret 
Wilkins, 279 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, 
California. 

, Enid Baush Patterson's daughter Jean, 
was married to William V. Smith on De- 
cember 8, 1945. 

Carl N. Lindsay, husband of Mary 
Erving, died on December 1, 1945, in 
Andover. 

Mrs. Lillian Gould, mother of Marian 
Gould Smith, died on January 6, in Andover. 

1914 

Married: Elsie Gleason Buckingham to 
Lowell Sloan, December 29, 1945. 

From La Jolla, Cal. comes a greeting to 
classmates from Margaret Wylie Ware. 
"Dear Classmates of 1914: My, we have 
here thanks to offer this Thanksgiving 



Day. My son, Jack, just arrived home from 
Saipan where he served with the 875 Bomb 
Group. I have kept happy and busy as 
manager of the snack-bar at the local U.S.O. 
Also taught a class in social dancing and 
have been coaching singers for our Saturday 
night talent show. All this will continue till 
spring. Good luck to all!" 

It's time to enter your daughter in Abbot 
for 1947! Write the school for a catalogue. 

1916 
Thirtieth Reunion 

Dear 1916'ers: Five years ago the more 
intelligent of us (who said that?) celebrated 
our 25th with a combined graduation time 
visit to Abbot and houseparty at Eugenia 
Parker's camp at Denmark, Maine. Vera 
managed to nick her nose whittling a hearth 
broom and the happily married members 
of our party bemoaned that friend husbands 
were not on hand to enjoy the pleasures of 
camp, but except for these casualties, it was 
a decided success. In fact Eugenia and I 
enjoyed it so much we think it the only 
proper way to celebrate our 30th. We hope 
you agree. I either have written or am writ- 
ing you all about it so read thoughtfully, 
consider carefully and make that obviously 
"intelligent" decision to be on hand for 
1916's 30th — June 8, 1946. 

Esther Kilton 
Eugenia Parker 
Reunion Chairmen 

George Hamer, distinguished composer 
and musician, father of Lillon Hamer Atkin- 
son, died October 2, 1945. 

Dorothy Pillsbury Bartlett's first grandson, 
Richard C. Bartlett 3rd was born on October 
7, 1945, to her son Lt. (j.g.) Richard C. 
Bartlett Jr. Her third son Tom who has been 
an aviation cadet for two years has entered 
Lafayette College. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. James E. 
Downs (Laura Cheever), Bancroft Rd., 
Andover. 

1917 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Oliver D. 
Wescott (Dorothy Small), 84 Main St., 
Nantucket. 

1918 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George J. 
Cutler (Velma Rowell) 45 Eliot St., Jamaica 
Plain. 



16 



Kathryn Cooper Richards sends news of 
her family. "My husband is returning from 
a year's duty in Honolulu, thus completing 
three and a half years of service as a naval 
doctor, and eligible for release. Our daugh- 
ter Nancy is a sophomore at Connecticut 
College, our older son Bob is a freshman at 
Harvard, and our younger son George is a 
day-pupil at Noble & Greenough School." 

Margaret Morriss Clausen's son is in his 
first year of Medical School at Dartmouth 
under the Navy. Her daughter is a senior at 
Springside School in Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

Margaret Van Voorhis sang the soprano 
solos in the "Messiah" at a performance at 
Zanesville, Ohio, in December. 

1919 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Grace L. 
Boynton (Grace Leyser) 30 Engle St., 
Tenafly, N. J. 

Jane Holt Atkinson's son entered Phillips 
Academy last fall. 

1920 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Beverly R. 
Hubbard (Muriel Moxley), 172 Putnam 
Ave., Hamden 14, Conn. 

1921 
Twenty-fifth Reunion 

Our 25th reunion is on June 8! Let's have 
a 100% turnout! This is an opportunity to 
forget our daily routine and get reacquainted 
with Abbot and our classmates. It has been 
suggested that we spend a night or two 
preceding reunion in a nearby seaside' hotel. 
Does this meet with your approval? Please 
write any suggestions you have to the chair- 
man. 

Marion Kimball Bigelow 

Reunion Chairman 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. David H. 
Bigelow (Marion Kimball) 326 Highland 
St., West Newton. 

Keep the Alumnae Office informed when 
you move. It costs only a cent to send a post 
card. 

1922 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. Evans 
Kephart (Ruth Hill), 23 Lyme Rd., Han- 
over, N. H. 

Helen Knight Wilkinson writes of her 
family, "Have a third child and second 
daughter Linda Leyland Wilkinson, born 



October 1944. Wendy is now three and 
Chadbourne is seventeen, a senior at Phil- 
lips Academy. During the last two war 
years I was president of the Lawrence 
Y.W.C.A. which serves five towns. 

1923 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Sterling 
Dow (Elizabeth Flagg), 36 Holden St., 
Cambridge. 

Mrs. Jackson W. Osborne, mother of 
Dolores Osborne Hall, '23, and Betty Osborne 
Bacon '29, died on August 17, 1945. 

1924 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. John Hol- 
den (Polly Bullard), 39 No. Pleasant St., 
Middlebury, Vermont. 

Ruth Flather Sadler's son, Paul Sadler Jr. 
was married to Merrie Anna Long on De- 
cember 12, 1945. 

1925 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George B. 
Beveridge (Charlotte Hanna), Sanford- 
town Rd., Redding, Conn. 

1926 
Twentieth Reunion 

To the members of the Class of '26. In 
June the Class of '26 will hold its 20th re- 
union; it just doesn't seem twenty years since 
we graduated from Abbot. Much has hap- 
pened since then and many changes have 
taken place. Some of us have not seen each 
other since then. Here is a grand chance to 
renew all those old friendships. Let's all 
make a special effort to be at Abbot on 
Alumnae Day, June 8. What kind of a re- 
union do you want? I need a lot of sug- 
gestions and help to make it a success. If it 
is impossible for you to come send news of 
your family and yourself, for the May 
Bulletin and our reunion. Here's hoping 
I shall see you or hear from you. 

M. Alice Perry 

Reunion Chairman 
1927 

Any reader interested to know more of 
Sydna White's work, Federalist Films, may 
write her at 391 Bleecker St., New York 
City. 

1928 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Emily Sloper, 
56 Russell St., New Britain, Conn. 

Married: Marion Quin to Capt. Cyril 
Melton Coggins, November 23, 1945. Dur- 



17 



ing the war Marion was a Price Specialist for 
the O.P.A. in New York. Before that she 
was a Fashion Coordinator for a coat and 
suit manufacturer in New York. At present 
she and her husband are living in Hender- 
sonville, N. C. 

1930 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Jack R. War- 
wick (Mary Jane Owsley), 26 Ledgewood 
Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 

The delayed report of the reunion of the 
class of '30 is here given for the benefit of 
those who were unable to be present. "The 
class of '30 celebrated their fifteenth reunion 
with enthusiasm, giggles and much chatter. 
The star attraction was Betty Brown Guild's 
wee new son. Ruth Baker Johnson was there, 
boasting two children the eldest of which is 
ten years old! Posy Castle Olivetti wrote 
about her two small sons, David and Alfred, 
and said, "I would like to read in the Bulle- 
tin about some of you whose names haven't 
appeared for a long time. Has everyone lost 
touch with Gay Chamberlain, Pete Simpson, 
Sis Gould, Betty Stout, Midge Turner?" 

Kay Dutton Leidy told of her husband, a 
Lt. in the USNR who had been on extremely 
active duty in the Pacific. She and her two 
and a half year old daughter, Rosanne Dutton 
Leidy, have been living in Boyertown, Pa. 

Grace Hadley in later news is now work- 
ing at the USO in Honolulu. She is with the 
junior hostesses, plans the entertainments 
etc. She has had six hula lessons and loves 
using the various expressive Hawaiian 
words. If any of you know service men com- 
ing through Honolulu tell them to look her 
up at the Victory Club. 

It was an unexpected pleasure when 
Jeanne Harrington Farr walked in, and she 
has one little girl, Constance. Alma Hill 
dashed in and out. Jackie Hoyt holds the 
banner for the number of children — four! 
Barbs Lamson Cummings left her husband at 
home taking care of Diane, aged six. Janice 
Lovell Jenkins had great tales of her three, 
Peter, Linda and Ann. Ruth Perry regretted 
her inability to come, had to stay in Pontiac 
with her two, Lynette, three and a half, 
and Bobby, six months. Betty Qidnby John- 
son back home in Milford, Conn, with her 
three and a half year old blue-eyed daughter, 
following a break in an unsuccessful marriage. 

Helen Ripley has received her honorable 
discharge from the WAVES, and is now 
Librarian and Information Secretary of 



International Education, in New York 
City. She answers questions by phone, mail, 
or in person from students all over the world 
who want to study and wish the best school 
in their field, and knowledge of living ar- 
rangements. "We try to further interna- 
tional understanding through student ex- 
change with other countries. Many re- 
quests come from veterans wanting to study 
abroad just now." 

El Ritchie was detained by her work in 
the Navy. Dot Seller wrote of her work 
during two years in the army. "I am fishing 
for a transfer from Newark Army Air Base 
to ATC in Manchester, N. H. Hope to 
settle in Maine after the war." 

Marianna Smith Hile has two girls, Martha 
eight, and Sally five. Doris Sturtevant Bacon 
was filling her time while her husband was 
with the Marines, doing Red Cross Home 
Service work and U.S.O. Frances Sullivan 
was married in 1942 to James Laurence 
Sullivan. While her husband was in the 
Pacific she lived in San Francisco. At time of 
reunion they were at Virginia Beach. 
Libby Tarr Morse has one child, Judith 
Elliott, two years old. 

Nini Owsley Warwick 

Born: to Lt. Com. and Mrs. Robert C. 
Holland (Barbara Healey) a son, Peter 
White, September 29, 1945. 

1931 
Fifteenth Reunion 

To the Class of 1 93 1 ! This is our fifteenth 
reunion! Let's make it the biggest one yet. 
All of us who live near Andover urge all of 
you who live in far away places to come to 
Abbot this June 8. I would suggest one 
evening with our Yearbook, if that doesn't 
decide you to come, then send lots of news of 
yourself. 

Doris Allen Carroll 

Reunion Chairman 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. Parker 
(Faith Chipman) their third child and first 
son, Reeve Chipman Parker, December 17, 

1945- 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Francis Hol- 
land (Barbara Graham) 218 West Marion 
Rd., South Bend, Indiana. 

1932 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Dorothy Rich- 
ardson, Boston Rd., Billerica. 



18 



Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John S. Giblin 
(Betty Holihan) a son, January 3. 

Judy Wilhelmi Dodane's husband Lt. 
Com. Robert L. Dodane was lost last spring 
on the submarine U.S.S. Trigger. She is 
working with Red Cross at Letterman Gen- 
eral Hospital in San Francisco and finds her 
contacts with returning veterans most stimu- 
lating and interesting. 

1933 

Rorn: To Mr. and Mrs. Myron Clark 
(Clara Smith) a son, Talbot Smith, April 25, 

1945- 

Have you sent your new address to the 
Alumnae Office? You don't want to miss the 
May Bulletin. 

1936 
Tenth Reunion 

1 936-1 946 
I can't make rhythm, I can't make rhyme, 
I haven't the brains and I haven't the time. 
But one thing I know that's perfectly clear 
Our tenth reunion is drawing near. 
From near and far, by train and car 
To Abbot we will return. 

Lots of familiar faces to us have gone, 
But we must see to it the school goes on; 
They need our support in every way — so — - 
Let's make our return a memorable day! 

We'll talk of our jobs, our families and such, 
We'll reminisce how we got in Dutch, 
Then figure whose daughter will enter with 

whose; 
Come on back girls! There's nothing to lose. 

The war years are over 
The battle is won; 
Let's come back to Abbot 
And see what's been done. 
Let's come back to Abbot 
And have some fun! 

With apologies to all poetesses of '36, and 
hoping to see each and everyone of you on 
June 8, on the Abbot Circle. 

Anne Russell Loring 

Reunion Chairman 

Born: To Lt. Com. and Mrs. William J. 

Starr Jr. (Marion Mooney) their second 

child, a son, William J. Starr III, April 23, 

1945- 



Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Stokes 
(Lois Holmes) a third child, Sharon, July 1, 
1945. Mark is almost six, and Susan four. 

Married: Rosalie Rappoport to Sylvan 
Allen Saul, November 21, 1945. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. John L. Simonds 
(Mary Trafton) a second child, a son, Rob- 
ert Langdon, October 26, 1945. 

1937 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur W. 
Tucker (Martha Elizabeth Ransom), 632 
Great Plain Rd., Needham. 

Engaged: Nancy Burns to Lt. John J. 
McArdleJr. M.C. 

Born: To Lt. and Mrs. Addison F. Vars 
Jr. (Nancy Kincaid) a son, Addison Foster 
Vars III, May 3, 1945. Nancy lives at 10 
Mayfair Lane, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Married: Sarah Sheldon to Donald La- 
Grange Miller, June 7, 1944. 

Born: To Lt. Com. and Mrs. John G. 
Martin Jr. (Ellen Simpson) a son, John 
Garvie Martin III, September 16, 1945. 

1938 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Davis Simpson 
(Phyllis Saunders) a third daughter, Sarah 
Ann, July 6, 1945. 

Jane Vogt Moxley writes that her husband 
was killed last August while strafing an air- 
field near Tokyo. She with her baby Kather- 
ine, are living with her family in Bingham- 
ton, N. Y. 

1939 

Lucia Buchanan joined the Red Cross last 
October, and has since been stationed at 
Fort Knox, Kentucky, working in the Separa 
tion Center. 

Married: Henrietta Fletcher to Lt. Peter 
Joseph Horan Jr. December 4, 1945. 

Engaged: Mary Koch to Sgt. Peter Danos. 

Married: Polly Ann Pancoast to William 
C. Tunkey, August 21, 1944. 

Married: Patricia Perry to Capt. Robert 
Frederick Braun, June 11, 1945. 

1940 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Mary Howard, 
66 Myrtle St., Apt. 9, Boston. 

Born: To Capt. and Mrs. F. L. Foster Jr. 
(Molly Chase) a son, Robert Chase Foster, 
November 22, 1945. Capt. Foster is with the 
army of occupation in Korea. 

Married: Marcia Colley to Major William 
Curtis Melton Jr., January 30, 1945. 



J 9 



Engaged: Phyllis Crocker to Clifford 
Wadsworth England. 

Engaged: Dorothy Garry to Lt. (j.g.) 
Louis Maynard Warlick. 

Engaged: Ellen L. Spear to Lt. Harry A. 
Moody Jr. 

Married: Joan Wyatt to Donald Bramley, 
December 28, 1945. 

1941 

Fifth Reunion 

Hi Group! Long time, no see. Yes, five 
whole years have gone by and now come 
Spring, it's time to push your foot to the 
accelerator, tie yourself to the wing, or crowd 
the baggage car heading for Abbot to cele- 
brate the first post-war reunion and our big 
Fifth reunion. There's a gay time in store for 
all of us. Old news to be brought up to date 
— and well — Let's all meet at Abbot on June 

8. Right? Right! 

Sue Long Kremer 

Reunion Chairman 

Married: Jane Davey to Hamilton Stew- 
art Corwin, June 12, 1945. 

Married: Dorothy Dean to Mitchell John- 
son Jr., October 24, 1945. Marjorie Dean 
Marsden '42 was her sister's matron of 
honour, and bridesmaids were Barbara 
Dean '47, and Eleanor Johnson Dutoit '35. 

Married: Mary Elizabeth Erkert to Henry 
D. Attorfer, December 23, 1944. 

Married: Nancy Gerrish to John Archi- 
bald MacFadyen Jr. January 26. 

Shortly after Elizabeth Harris' marriage 
to James Davy on August 7, 1945, her hus- 
band was killed in an auto accident, and she 
received serious injuries. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Roberts G. Hanne- 
gan (Doris Jones), a second son, Roger 
Wightman, November 8, 1945. 

Married: Margery Martin to Raymond K. 
Martin November 22, 1944. In February '45 
Margery graduated from New York Uni- 
versity as an Institutional Manager. 

Married: Jessie McCreery to Philip Macy 
Reed, May 15, 1945. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Wil- 
liams (Julie Nelson) a son, Edward Monroe 
Jr. September 27, 1945. 

Engaged: Jane Parrot to Arthur K. 
Brown Jr. 

Married: Amelia Shields to Eduardo 
Guirola, Jr., January 5, in Mexico City. 
Address: 9a Calle Porinente 12, Guatemala 
City, Guatemala. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. 



Hakanson (Bonney Wilson), a daughter 
Bonney Lee, December 21, 1945. 



Put the Alumnae Office on your list of 
wedding announcements. Then send your 
new address at once! 



1942 

Born: To the Rev. and Mrs. John B. 
Reinheimer (Ann Bacon), a son, David 
Bartel, November 18, 1945, in Appleton, 
Wisconsin. 

Born: To Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. Darwin W. 
Heath (Sue Bates), a daughter, Susan Hardy, 
November 15, 1945. 

Married: Louise Clark to Lt. James W. 
Gilland, June 6, 1945. 

Engaged: Mary Elizabeth Dunaway to 
Donald Love Burnham. Mr. Burnham is in 
the Navy Medical Reserve and will graduate 
from Cornell Medical College in March. 

Married: Charlotte Eaton (aff. '42) to 
Malcolm Southback Burr, November 2, 1945. 

Frances Flint's father, Dr. William W. 
Flint Jr., died November 11, 1945. He had 
been a master at St. Paul's School for 
twenty-six years. 

Margaret McFarlin graduated from the 
Massachusetts General Hospital in the fall, 
and is now at the Memorial Hospital in 
North Conway, N. H. 

Edith Ninomiya is working for her M.A. 
degree at the University of Minnesota, in 
Minneapolis. Her major is Far Eastern Area 
Studies in the Political Science Department. 
She is also acting as assistant to Dr. Werner 
Levi; proctoring and supervizing exams, so 
finds herself very busy generally. 

Married: Ruth Rathbone to Edward W. 
Hildreth, November 9, 1945. 

Married: Thirsa Sands to Lt. (j.g.) Robert 
Spindler Fuiks, December 27, in Yonkers, 
N.Y. 

Engaged: Margaret Sime to Niels Espe- 
land. Mr. Espeland is a mining engineer in 
Tanganyika, Africa, where Margaret plans 
to fly with his mother this summer for her 
marriage. 

Married: Emma Ann Todd to John A. 
Hemlet, December 3, 1944. 

Frances Troub is studying at the Graduate 
School at Yale working for her M.A. in the 
department of education. She plans to 
specialize in guidance work with pre-school 
age children. 



20 



1943 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Marion Bur- 
dine, 404 N.E. 26th Terrace, Miami, Fla. 

Honora Haynes is studying sculpture at 
the Boston Museum School of Art. 

Cornelia McMurray is studying interior 
decorating at the Parsons School of Design, 
and loves it. But she adds that she wouldn't 
have missed her years at Wellesley College. 

Married: Betty-Lou Monnett to Major 
Louis Bradburn Hess, November 24, 1945. 

Engaged: Sylvia Peters to Robert Deem 
Agler. 

Engaged: Joyce Yoffa to Ensign Robert P. 
Rudolph USNR. 

1944 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Nancy Mc- 
Ivor, 13 Auburn St., Concord, N. H. 

Patricia Damon has transferred from the 
Garland School to the Boston School of Oc- 
cupational Therapy. 

Married: Shirley Harrison (aff. '44) to 
Walter Charles Emmett, November 23, 1945. 
Her sister Nancy '40 was her maid of 
honour. 



Engaged: Aagot Hinrichsen to John E. 
Gain Jr. 

Married: Mary Ann Moss (aff. '44) to 
William Royce McDonough, June 7, 1945. 

Shirley Woodams writes, "Since I enjoy 
so reading the news about other girls who 
were at Abbot while I was there, I feel it is 
certainly time I sent some news to the Bulle- 
tin. Last summer I spent a month on a field 
trip with the Rochester Museum. We went 
to Brewertan, N. Y. in order to study two 
types of Indian culture. The remainder of 
the summer I spent at Eastman Kodak in- 
specting Velox. In the fall I returned to the 
University of Rochester. Last November I 
received my Pilot's license, also was elected 
vice-president of the University Aviation 
Club, which has thirty-five members." 

1945 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Shirley Som- 
mer, 1367 Brown Hills Rd., Rockford, 
Illinois. 

Engaged: Gretchen Fuller to Sgt. Donald 
Frazier, USAAF. 



Jl. 



ave You Moved, Do You Hopefully Search? 
Send Us Word by the Very Next Mail. 
Have You News of Interest for Friends to Read? 
Send Us Word Ere We Lose Your Trail. 



Name 



Class 



Address 



Postal District No. 



Write news about yourself and others for the May Bulletin. Tear out 
and mail before March 15, to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Andover, 
Mass. 



Record of War Service 

Please fill out and return as soon as possible to the 
Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Andover, Mass. 



Maiden Name Glass . . . 

Married Name 

Address 

Postal District No. 



Branch and Name of Service: Army Navy Marine 

Coast Guard Medical Air Red Cross 

Rank: Promotions: 

Date of Entering : 

Date of Discharge 

Report on Type and Place of Work Enclose Photo in Uniform 



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Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 

Mrs. Rolfe M. Kennedy 
(Roberta Kendall) 
255 Park Lane 
Douglaston, N. Y. 

Vice-presidents 

Mrs. Frank G. D'Elseaux 
(Virginia Gay) 
9 Lawrence Street 
Winchester, Mass. 

Mps. Ernest F. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
50 Windsor Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
8 Carisbrooke Street 
Andover, Mass. 



OFFICERS, 1 944- 1 946 

Clerk 
Mrs. Edwin H. Goodwin 
(Susan Hildreth) 
371 Highland Avenue 
Winchester, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. James E. Downs 
(Laura Cheever) 
Bancroft Road 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 
Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
5 Morton Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 
Miss Marion McPherson 
3^ Summer Street 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 

1942-194^ i945~ I 95 I 

Miss Margaret Van Voorhis Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 

304 Lexington Avenue (Helen Allen) 

New York City, N. Y. 246 Glen Road 

Weston 93, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 

Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
50 Windsor Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. J. Allen Lind 

(Mary Simpson) 

1 239 Asbury Avenue 

Winnetka, 111. 

CONNECTICUT 

Miss Sara G. Peck 
20 Fairview Terrace 
Derby, Conn. 

DETROIT 

Mrs. Thomas Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
1 2 1 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Mich. 

MAINE, EASTERN 

Miss Eleanor Bird 
250 Broadway 
Rockland, Maine 



MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Harold Robinson 
(Harriette Woolverton) 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

NEW YORK 
Miss Gertrude E. Holbrook 
Stonecrest Apartments 
Larchmont, N. Y. 

OHIO CENTRAL 
Mrs. Paul Meek 
(Louise Norpell) 
Worthington, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 
Mrs. George Worthington 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 

Mrs. A. Scudder Moore 
(Ruth Murray) 
96 South Elm Street 
West Bridgewater, Mass. 

PITTSBURGH 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
515 North McKean Street 
Butler, Pa. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 13 



MAY, 1946 



Issue 3 



Table of Contents 



Cover design: by W. Abbott Cheever 

Frontispiece: Past Principals of Abbot 

Ten Years at Abbot 

Alumnae Association Annals 

Thank You! 

To the Alumnae Trustees 

The Trustees of Abbot Academy 

Education for One World 

Commencement Program 

Reunion Chairmen . 

Alumnae Association 

Abbot Clubs 

In Memoriam 

Class News 

Record of War Service 



Marguerite C. Hearsey 
Jane B. Carpenter 
Burton S. Flagg 



page 

3 

5 
20 

22 

23 

23 

24 

24 

25 
26 

27 
27 
37 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

JANE B. CARPENTER, 1892, honorary 

CONSTANCE PARKER CHIPMAN, 1906, Editor in Chief 

marion r. Mcpherson, 191 8 

ROBERTA KENDALL KENNEDY, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 






JS'Z*: 



m 



LAURA S. WATSON 
1892-1898 



KATHERINE R. KELSEY 

Acting Principal 
1909-1910— 1911-1912 



Past Principals 
of 

4k 

Abbot 
Academy 





PHILENA McKEEN 

1859-1892 




EMILY A. ME: 
1898-1911 




BERTHA BAIL] 

1912-1935 



Ten Years at Abbot 




MARGUERITE C. HEARSE Y, Ph.D 
Principal since igj6 



It lias been said, and often repeated, 
that an institution is the lengthened 
shadow of a man. Of Abbot we can say 
that the shadow of Sarah Abbot has 
lengthened through the years since 
1828, when she gave to the School the 
thousand dollars needed for the acre of 
ground on which Abbot Hall was built. 
It was she who, first of all, made the 
School possible. 

But with a school or college, I think 
it would be at least as true to say that 
the institution is the outward and 
visible evidence, "the shadow," of the 
love and loyalty of its graduates. As the 
years have passed an increasing number 
of old girls have not only built them- 
selves into the very fabric of the School 
but have been contributors to much of 
the physical and material beauty of the 
buildings and the grounds of the ex- 
panding Abbot until today, with our 
spacious campus and eight buildings, there is scarcely a place to which one 
can turn which is not to some measure "the shadow" of alumnae generosity. 

Quite aside from the generous gifts which the alumnae have made to the 
School and will continue to make, it is of their enduring and appreciative 
affection that I feel Abbot has the greatest reason to be proud. It has been 
commented on frequently that the affection of men and women for their 
preparatory schools is often stronger than for their colleges and this is not 
unnatural, I think. However stimulating and significant the influences of 
college years, it is earlier that the deepest impressions are made, and often the 
most lasting friendships. And so one turns back to the formative period of 
school days with the happiest of memories. 

In my ten years at Abbot it has been a great pleasure to have the old 
girls coming back in such a friendly way, knowing, apparently, that there 
would always be a welcome for them here. It is delightful to have them come 
quite often with a new young husband, to show Abbot to him and to show 
him to Abbot! I always feel that behind such a pilgrimage there lies the 
desire that the husband should see for himself and somehow understand the 
enthusiasm of his wife for her school, so that he will have a real sharing with 
her in a happy part of her past. Frequently old girls return for special tradi- 
tional occasions and this is heartwarming, too. The Christmas Service brings 
many, and Miss Friskin's recital, and Abbot's Birthday, not to mention 
Commencement. 



As one goes on into the increasing demands of life after school and col- 
lege, one is caught in the responsibilities of family life and community activi- 
ties, and perhaps it is difficult to leave home for a trip back to reunions, or 
even to find time for regular attendance at local alumnae meetings. But I 
have been impressed through my ten years with the numbers who do find a 
way to come, with the wide span of years that is covered at the alumnae 
meetings, and with the enthusiasm that seems to be shared by old and young 
alike. I notice, too, that at different club meetings, aside from the group who 
are able to attend quite regularly and carry the responsibility of the club, 
always a few people appear who have never come before and they seem to be 
delighted and refreshed with the fellowship they find. The spring is always 
there, it seems, and inexhaustible in its supply, and its refreshment seems to 
derive from something deeper than just a common memory of youthful 
pleasure. 

For me, personally, the welcome and support of the alumnae from the 
beginning of my association with Abbot has been a constant source of joy 
and inspiration. I cannot adequately express my gratitude for the way in 
which from the alumnae banquet at Commencement in 1936 — even before 
I took over my duties officially — to the latest meeting of the Boston Abbot 
Club this spring, I have always been made to feel as much a part of the 
alumnae as any Abbot girl! I value deeply this warm friendliness, and I am 
especially aware now, as this Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of the founding of the 
Alumnae Association approaches, of the indispensable part the alumnae 
have played in making Abbot what it is today, not only in bricks and mortar 
and trees and gardens but even more significantly in character and in spirit. 




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Sunset Lodge, home of the Principal 



Alumnae Association Annal: 



s 



Jane B, Carpenter 

Assistant Secretary seven years, from i<)i"„ Corresponding Secre- 
tin v eleven years. General Secretary six years, resigned 1936; Jbundet 
^Bulletin, 1923, and editor-in-chief until 193S, 




The story begins like. I his. Miss 
McKeen's sister, "Miss Phebe," 
keen-eyed, spirited, stimulating, 
is said to have been the one who 
first suggested and who fostered 
the idea of an alumnae society. 
Imagine her eagerly presenting 
it in her clear way to the group of 
curious and interested women 
gathered on Anniversary Day in 
[871. During the twelve years 
since the Me. Keen sisters came, 
over 600 girls had gone in and out 
between the tall old pillars, and 
before that 900 more. What pos- 
sibilities in a plan for binding 
these together to stand behind the 
School and further its interests! 
Then- had been conferences and 
consultations of course and now 
the time had come for action. 
'Yes," they agreed, "include all 
old scholars, graduates being so 
few comparatively, and teachers as well." 

A constitution was all ready for adoption, drawn up so carefully that 
with few changes it lasted for many years. As for officers, what more natural 
choice lor- president than Susan Jackson, daughter of a "founding father?" 
It was her mother who started action among Andover women in 1854 to 
provide furnishings for the first dormitory, Smith Hall. A good precedent 
for- the Alumnae Society! Miss Jackson, calm, competent, decided, accus- 
tomed to preside- in a classroom, served as chairman for six years. 

Then there was Charlotte Swift, also daughter of a trustee, a gentle, 
gracious little lady, who had qualified for the position as secretary of the 
Society by doing what would now be called oflice work for Miss McKcen, 
thereby familiarizing herself with the names of pupils. She soon bought two 
great blank books, one lor the many membcrs-to-be of the Society, the other 
for a list of all past pupils, with married names and addresses. Valiantly she 






PHEBE McKEEN 




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began on this difficult pioneer work, which later served as a basis for the first 
general catalogue, published in time for use in arranging for the Semi- 
centennial in 1879. Thus early was the necessity realized of getting and 
keeping the lines of communication open. Miss Swift was in fact the first 
Keeper of Alumnae Records, and a good one. 

The most important provision of the Constitution was for the accumula- 
tion of membership or initiation fees in an "Alumnae Fund," with the 
income only for use. That meant, it was said, "not five dollars to be used and 
exhausted, but the interest of five dollars forever." This plan required some 
faith, for the School itself then owned but one invested fund — a $1000 
scholarship foundation. The yearly interest was to be used for "means of 
illustrating studies," and only after ten years of laboriously building up of 
the principal could Miss McKeen, for the "Committee of Appropriation," 
announce with gratification and pride the first purchase, that of four mic- 
roscopes for the botany classes. At every annual meeting thereafter, new and 
diverse gifts were reported, often exhibited and always rejoiced over. Such 
were art casts, models and apparatus, maps and books, books, books. One 
woman said she could hardly wait to hear the treasurer's report. Not only 
were departments of study thus benefited, but from that time on hardly a 
big enterprise of any kind has been undertaken but the Association has had a 
hand or at least a finger in it one way or another, initiating, completing, or 
cooperating throughout. 

In 1880, on the resignation of Miss Swift as corresponding secretary, 
Agnes Park came into the picture, the daughter of Professor Park, the august 
president for many years of the Board of Trustees. Tall and plain, she was 
vivacious, vigorously intellectual and staunch in devotion to people and 
causes. Presidents came and went, but for forty-two years, most of the time 
as both secretary and treasurer, she was the mainspring of the organization. 
After her death in 1922, in spontaneous and hearty recognition of this tireless 
service, it was decided to use the proceeds of an elaborate bazaar just held by 
Andover alumnae, her friends and neighbors, with other money allocated 
from the Loyalty Endowment Fund, then in the making, to found an Agnes 
Park Chair of History. Two appropriations from Association income brought 
the amount to $2500. 

President for thirteen years from 1877 was influential Abby Chapman 
Chamberlain (later Mrs. Poor), who was repeatedly elected until ill health 
forced her to resign. The death in 1880 of Miss Phebe McKeen, to whom the 
Association was so greatly indebted in its beginnings, was sincerely mourned, 
and a scholarship completed to perpetuate her name. A little later her 
portrait, painted by Emily Means from likenesses and from memory, and 
the one of Miss McKeen by Edgar Parker, were presented to the School in 
recognition of the twenty-fifth anniversary of their coming to Andover. 

A new custom was introduced in 1887. There was held in Boston the 
first of a long series of social functions, still continuing. This one was pre- 
liminary to the famous great Lawn Party given by the Association in June, 



when "throngs of ladies and gentlemen" were received under the old oak 
on "Davis Green," near Smith Hall. In the changes necessary to make room 
for the Draper Hall-to-be, that great wooden building was very soon to be 
moved to the site where the Infirmary now stands, and Abbot Hall (then 
still known as the "Academy") was turned about from its original place 
toward the middle of the present "Circle," facing School Street, to its present 
somewhat less commanding position. Incidentally it may be mentioned that 
the first direct effort toward the new building fund had been made by the 
Association. 

A vital period in the history was the eight years following 1890, while 
the stately Miss Means was president. Already as teacher of painting, she had 
known the School from the faculty point of view. Here she gained a full 
sympathy and understanding of the possibilities and problems of the alumnae 
body, which was of great advantage to her and to the organization when she 
became principal in 1898. It was the Association that began the movement 
for the Means Memorial Library, through the active work of Mary Byers 
Smith and her committee. This was later merged with the building fund 
campaign. 

One high spot in dates was 1891. At the business meeting a plan for 
supplementing the regular income to cover further needs was brought 
forward by an enterprising young graduate, Daisy Douglass Macfarland, 
who was thereupon appointed head of a committee to advertise it, obtain 
pledges for yearly contributions and collect them. This "Auxiliary Fund" 
was the precursor of the later Alumnae Income Fund, with the same aim — 
to provide usable moneys as if they were dividends from an invested fund. 
After eighteen years of arduous effort by the originator of the idea, there was 
reversion to capital investment. Miss Maria Merrill managed to raise in 
short order $5000 for a Lecture Fund, the income of which, though now 
quite inadequate, sufficed for some years to secure excellent and sometimes 
noted lecturers. 

Interestingly enough, it was at the same meeting in 1 89 1 that discussion 
arose about asking the trustees to include women on the Board, causing 
"considerable stir," according to the Courant. Think of the general status of 
women at that time, and decide if this was not one more indication of the 
pioneering spirit. The trustees acquiesced, and elected two well-known and 
well-qualified Association members, Frances Kimball Harlow, former 
teacher, and Henrietta Learoyd Sperry, alumna, former teacher, and acting 
principal. Later, Mary Donald Churchill, who was elected to succeed her 
husband, and whose dignified little figure and long generous service are not 
forgotten, was for a time the only woman member. Nearly twenty-five years 
after the first innovation, in 191 5, the Board asked for a direct alumnae 
representative to be nominated by ballot, and again in 1935 for a second 
"alumnae trustee." What could be more direct evidence of the value in 
which they were held? At present one half the Board are women. 

An important event was the McKeen Breakfast, given by the Association 
8 




Lilian Waters Grosvenor '72 in center of group of students around 187 1 



in the winter of 1892, in warm tribute to the retiring principal and the 
devoted service to which she had given almost half her life. This was a dis- 
tinguished occasion, with the inimitable Professor Churchill, teacher of 
elocution and trustee, as toastmaster, and many other felicitous speakers. 
In June, the Association gave a second large lawn party to enable alumnae, 
their families, and friends to pay their respects to Miss McKeen. One sig- 
nificant by-product of the "Breakfast" should not be overlooked. The author 
of the idea, Laura Wentworth Fowler (one of Miss McKeen's first graduating 
class, i860), was impressed while promoting it with the opportunity for form- 
ing an alumnae society in the vicinity of Boston, and presented the matter to 
the Association. A committee was thereupon appointed, of which she was 
chairman, "to work up the Abbot Club." As founded (in 1892), therefore, 
albeit "entirely independent," it was virtually a daughter of the Association. 
The second local club was formed in New York six years later. Since then 
they have often joined forces with the older and larger group in furthering 
great objectives. 



An evidence of the keen interest taken in the future educational policy 
of the School under the new administration was the discussion at the business 
meeting of that year of 1892, which resulted in a vote — "Resolved: that we 
regard the work of Abbot Academy in fitting girls to enter directly into 



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active life as of such importance that it should not be allowed to become in 
any way subordinate to the work of preparing them for college." Such 
expressions of alumnae opinion did not go unnoticed by the new principal, 
Miss Watson, and her successors. Courses preparing for college were intro- 
duced more and more, but thoughtful study of the matter was made at 
different junctures by carefully selected faculty committees and a balance 
sought between the general or "academic" program and that preparatory 
for college. Of late years, students aiming toward further study have pre- 
dominated. 

In the story of these earlier years — the first quarter century, 1871-96 — 
many details have purposely been given, both to recall the origin of tradi- 
tions which still endure and are taken for granted, and to show how many 
times the Association blazed a trail. It was a great advantage to have the 
Fund under the watchful care of Mr. Draper, as School treasurer, with his 
characteristic caution and scrupulous attention to detail. Mrs. Draper, too, 
was an active force in many ways, at one time making the Homestead a 
center for committee work on records. 

Among distinctive personalities is noted Anne Means, cousin of the prin- 
cipal, who was chairman for five years ( 1 899- 1 904) of the committee to raise 
the large sum required to build McKeen Memorial Hall. Appreciative 
minutes show how with her natural drollery and brisk courage she energized 
her co-workers to meet many delays and difficulties, and finally achieved the 
goal with the enviable record of a hundred per cent payment of pledges. 
There was a crucial moment when the trustees had decided upon the plans, 
and the builders were pressing to begin work so as to finish in time for the 
observance of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the School in 1 904, and still 
the goal was by no means reached. Then some one came to the rescue with 
a loan of $10,000 without interest. It may not have been generally known 
that this rescuer was Miss Emily Means, then principal, her only condition 
being that the money be repaid as fast as it came in after the completion of 
the requisite amount. 

With the rejoicing and celebrating over, Anne Means and her aides, 
apparently as a reward for well-doing, were reappointed to take care of the 
supplementary business of providing science laboratories in Abbot Hall. 
Generously the chairman, her sister, Mary Means, and Helen Smith Coburn, 
took over the expense of the changes. 

The gifted Anna Dawes, eloquent, witty, and of dignified presence, was 
head of the Association for a double term, 1910-14. Her experience in Wash- 
ington social life, as a senator's daughter, and in woman's club activities, 
showed in her ease of manner and readiness of speech. In a transition period 
covering a change in administration, she gave expression to warm apprecia- 
tion of Miss Means and her regime, and with equal sincerity, at the inaugura- 
tion exercises, pledged the allegiance of the alumnae to Miss Bailey and the 
new era. This was important, for Miss Bailey's very coming was partly 

1 1 



motivated by the thought of a strong body of Abbot women to be depended 
on. To stimulate informed cooperation Miss Dawes initiated, in 191 2, the 
plan of an Advisory or Visiting Committee, whereby a few alumnae at a 
time, of different periods, could be shown the everyday life and workings of 
the School in order to become more intelligent in recommending it. Those 
who were able to accept the invitation showed a lively interest and an appre- 
ciation of the welcoming hospitality, and sometimes, as had been requested, 
made constructive criticisms. The committee functioned until 1939, when 
it gave place to a more widely representative group — the Alumnae 
Council. Two interesting meetings were held, in 1940 and 1941, then 
further developments had to be postponed because of difficulties due to war 
conditions. 

The year 1 9 1 3 marks the beginning of a practical linkage between the 
Association and the administration in the election, as assistant secretary, of 
the Keeper of Alumnae Records (Jane Carpenter), a school-supported 
officer. Mr. Flagg had with characteristic foresight early recognized the 
importance of placing the record keeping machinery on a firm basis in order 
to insure the frequent communications to alumnae which he recommended, 

and had created this 
position in 1909. It 
was convenient now 
for the Association to 
have on the staff some- 
one whose business it 
was to be on hand any- 
way for the School and 
who could carry out 
the suggestions of a 
committee, headed by 
Miss Kelsey, for pro- 
moting reunions. Head- 
quarters were arrang- 
ed at Commencement 
in McKeen Hall in 
1 9 1 5 and thereafter, 
where information and 
hospitality were dis- 
pensed. Publicity for 
regulation five-year re- 
unions, as in college, 
was sent out, which 
tended to increase at- 
tendance. Then too 
the custom was begun 
of having the graduat- 
Miss Carpenter and Mr. Flagg ing class join the As- 




12 




Alice C. Twitchell '86 



sociation as a body, with a little ceremony 
of induction at the June meeting. The five 
dollar membership fees, patiently collected 
in instalments by Miss Kelsey, made wel- 
come additions to the invested Fund, as 
the outgoing classes had come to be of 
good size. The time was ripe for new 
achievements. 

The Association soon found opportunity 
for action, in 1919-20, with the beginnings 
of the movement to increase largely the 
School endowment funds. These were 
woefully inadequate. For one thing, the 
need for providing better salaries for 
teachers had for some years been recog- 
nized and talked about and was becoming 
urgent. In December, 1919, a circular 
letter from Miss Bailey to all past students 
proposed as a possibility and an oppor- 
tunity a plan to raise by means of gifts and pledges during the course of the 
coming ten years a Centennial Memorial Fund, later named the Loyalty 
Endowment Fund, to be presented at the celebration marking the one- 
hundredth anniversary of the opening of the School. The proposition was 
discussed in conferences of trustees, faculty and alumnae, and was finally 
turned over to the Association to carry through. The trustees gave their 
solid backing by promising to cover overhead charges so that all moneys 
contributed might be kept intact. 

The moving spirit of the enterprise was Alice Twitchell, "Director," 
whose unflagging energy and sturdy confidence in the Tightness and im- 
portance of the cause swept aside all obstacles and discouragements. A secret 
of her wide influence lay in her intense interest in people, which made her 
innumerable letters not only friendly and appreciative of even the smallest 
gift but individual and personal. It was the same as she moved about the 
country forming or reviving local Abbot Clubs from Maine through the 
middle west. She remembered faces and names, stored up bits of news to pass 
on to others, thought to ask about jobs and children and parents, sympa- 
thized and rejoiced in turn. Her visits at the School brought her in close 
touch not only with seniors, whom she thought of as prospective alumnae, but 
with underclass girls and with faculty. A definite sum was not fixed, but 
always as gifts reached a temporary goal, she triumphantly raised it a notch 
higher, as they lift the bar in vaulting. More important to her than money 
returns was the interest roused in the future well-being of the School. 

A central committee, with an active chairman and rotating membership, 
prepared or superintended publicity, thought up ingenious ways and means, 
secured district leaders, helped with correspondence and otherwise supported 
the Director. The chief projects originating in the committee were the Staf- 



J 3 



fordshire Abbot plates, in charge of Annis Spencer Gilbert, and the 'Journal 
of an Abbot Girl," consisting of extracts and drawings from the clever diary 
of Harriet Ghapell Newcomb, class of 1876, which was published through 
the efforts of Flora Mason. Various other souvenirs brought in lesser returns. 
School birthday observances in May were introduced and included yearly 
bazaars, conducted with characteristic zeal by students and patronized by 
neighbors and friends. Among faculty undertakings were several distin- 
guished concerts, and a cafeteria, managed in 1921 for Commencement 
guests by Miss Mary Putnam. 

A definite aid in the progress of the Fund was the Abbot Bulletin, 

which appeared opportunely 
in 1923. It was first conceived 
by Mr. Flagg, decided upon 
by a general conference, in- 
cluding representatives of trus- 
tees, faculty, and alumnae, 
and sponsored by the trustees, 
who nevertheless let it be pub- 
lished under the name of the 
Association and sent free to all 
former students. However, the 
Association did later make 
appropriations toward its sup- 
port until postal regulations 
forbade. There was definite 
demand for such an organ of 
publicity. Calls for gifts were 
going out. It was essential to 
supplement these with direct 
information about current developments at the School, explanations of 
policies and pictures of everyday life — anything to make present conditions 
live and real to the many who still thought of Abbot as remaining exactly 
the same as when they were students ten, twenty, forty years before. The 
Bulletin also gave opportunity to Association, club, and class leaders to 
report and promote group activities and reunions. In 1932, by pressure of 
alumnae public opinion, personal items were reluctantly transferred from 
the Courant in order to reach all the constituency instead of the limited 
number who subscribed to the older magazine. Most important indeed, and 
worthy of all praise, has been the service rendered by the Courant in numerous 
ways since its founding in 1873, on ly two years later than the Association 
itself. In these early days of the Bulletin, Miss Bailey's sympathetic counsel 
was invaluable. In fact, she was in all ways an unfailing source of confidence, 
strength and courage during the long, slow growth of the Fund. She prepared 
circular letters and leaflets, traveled widely, visiting and heartening alumnae 
groups, stood behind School efforts, and made the home place a hospitable 
center for working committees and individuals. 

14 




The Centennial Plate 






Even a short time after the Fund was started, the unifying effects of 
working together with a common purpose became apparent. From the 
intensive work of regional committees and of clubs, old and new, came 
addresses long unknown, and hence new opportunities for advance. Nothing 
seemed too hard to the workers when somebody would say, "Glad to do 
what I can" or "Use me wherever I can fit in best." An important step for- 
ward was made possible when the School was able in 1927 to provide a room 
in Abbot Hall where alumnae activities could be centered. The assistant 
secretary had already been made corresponding secretary (1920), and as 
duties broadened became, in 1 93 1 , general secretary. In these ways the 
affiliation of School and Association was made still closer. 

The concentration on the growing Loyalty Fund kept all eyes focused on 
the approaching Centennial. For months in advance hardworking commit- 
tees put their whole hearts into making the machinery run smoothly. The 
excitements of the great occasion are still delightfully distinct in the minds of 
those who attended — the hearty fellowship of the alumnae luncheon in the 
big tent, with surprise gifts to individuals in recognition of noteworthy 
service; the living pictures of successive periods ("The Years Between"), 
flashing vivid memories to the thrilled beholders; and the emotional moment 
when the colorful parade by classes completely filled the Circle, symbolizing 
the ring of Abbot women round the globe. The culmination of the ten years 
of arduous effort came in the dignified ceremony of presentation. At a signal 
the many alumnae present rose while Alice Twitchell, modestly but with 
deep feeling, passed over to Mr. Flagg the gift of $160,000. 

Some method of continuing the good habit of annual giving came next 
under consideration as a natural aftermath of the Fund arrangement. The 
idea was promoted by Edith Dewey Jones, former Association president, who 
had been the able executive secretary of the Central Centennial Committee, 
and w r as carried to fulfilment after her death, under Annie Smart Angus as 
president, in 1932, against the odds of a depression period. Membership in 
the Association, instead of being contingent upon the payment of an "initia- 
tion fee," was thrown open to all students on leaving the School. The "Alum- 
nae Income Fund," a revival of an old scheme, was set up for voluntary 
gifts, with a committee in charge and a faithful secretary-treasurer, Ruth 
Childs Young. The first year, $1000 was thus raised, half of which was 
allocated toward a music scholarship in memory of Mrs. Jones. Later grants 
were for emergency tuitional aids and Association expenses usually gener- 
ously borne by the School. In 1939, the Alumnae Fund was again modified, 
this time to supplement the building campaign, and the limiting word 
"Income" withdrawn. By the present plan, yearly Fund returns may be 
given to the School either to be set aside as capital or used for immediate 
needs. Unexpectedly substantial support has been received, the class fund 
secretaries, as part of the new organization, furnishing material aid. 

In those lean years of financial stringency just mentioned, Abbot was 
glad of help in the increasing of enrolment. "Visiting Days" were introduced 

15 



in the spring of 1932, when the School held open house with exhibitions and 
demonstrations of the lighter side of school life as well as the academic. 
Alumnae within motoring distance cooperated heartily by bringing friends 
with daughters who might become pupils. Constance Parker Chipman, 
whose pronounced efficiency as Association president at the time of the Cen- 
tennial, combined with her long familiarity with School interests through 
family connections, had led to her election as trustee, was made field secre- 
tary, and undertook the program of visiting Abbot Clubs in other parts of the 
country. These groups responded helpfully by spreading the word in their 
vicinities. 

As time passed, careful study was made of ways to increase alumnae 
attendance at Commencement. A Reunion Reorganization Committee, 
working for several years from 1934, improved the machinery by preparing 
a definite procedure for class chairmen. Alluring changes in 1935 were 
Alumnae Day to Saturday, to suit the current week-end habit, alumnae 
headquarters from McKeen Hall to the spacious and more convenient rooms 
of the John-Esther Gallery, and an evening "banquet" instead of an informal 
luncheon. 

Twice something most unusual has happened in the way of fifty-year 
reunions. In 1927 all surviving members of '77 were present, and in 1936 the 
same was true of '86, both groups noted for strong class spirit. In recent years, 
although war restrictions have necessarily limited social gatherings, class 
groups have met in different centers, and the older and smaller classes have 
greatly enjoyed reunions through the exchange of letters. 

The Association was honored in 1929 by membership in the American 
Alumni Council of colleges and secondary schools. This has brought valued 
opportunities for Association representatives to attend conferences of alumni 
secretaries at different colleges and hear practical discussions of problems and 
techniques. The Association is eligible to three-point membership on the 
strength of having a Bulletin, an Office, and a Fund. 

The story now goes back to June, 1932. In tribute to Miss Kelsey and 
Miss Mason on their retirement, a reception was given by the Association in 
Davis Hall and the after-luncheon program enriched with a pretty ceremony, 
when representatives of five-year periods covering their long service voiced 
the affectionate appreciation of all. The linking of their names in the Kelsey- 
Mason Sitting Room of the new Abbey House, announced a few months 
before Miss Kelsey's death in 1939, was a satisfaction to everybody. 

In November, 1935, a stunning blow fell on an unready Abbot world in 
the news of Miss Bailey's death while she was on leave of absence. Words of 
affection and respect from every one of her graduating classes were brought 
together with characteristic skill by Miss Rebekah Chickering in a special 
number of the Courant, issued shortly thereafter. Large numbers of alumnae 
and friends gathered at the usual Boston meeting in February for a service 
of "happy remembrance." The proposal for a memorial to Miss Bailey came 

16 




NEW WING WITH BAILEY HALL (The Dining Room) 
MEANS MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



originally from her first graduating class, 19 13, and was announced at the 
annual business meeting in 1936. This was soon merged with a larger plan. 

And now a door opened wide to the future. Miss Hearsey, as principal- 
elect, addressing the alumnae at their banquet in June, 1936, expressed her 
faith in the enduring qualities of the Abbot heritage and tradition and her 
confidence that change need not be feared, since the future would be deter- 
mined by the spirit and ideals of the past. With her fresh enthusiasm she 
worked with the Trustees, facing problems which were crying out for solu- 
tion. First of all, obviously, something must be done about the increasingly 
crowded conditions in the library. It was decided, however, that this should 
be considered, not as a separate proposition, but in relation to other needs, 
and after much thought the Second Century Building Fund campaign was 
launched. The firm of Tamblyn and Brown, of New York, engaged to direct 
proceedings, established a busy office in lower Abbot Hall in the fall of 1937, 
and set about finding new friends for Abbot and uniting all forces to work for 
the cause. Alumnae committees worked under the important General Ex- 
ecutive Committee. Everybody in the widespread Abbot family, it seemed, 
was drawn into the plan to give money or time, tact, patience and per- 
severance. Plaudits are due them all, officers and privates alike. 

The immediate results of the campaign, in addition to the intangible 
gains in morale, were, in brief, the gift of the Emily F. Abbey Dormitory, and 
the remodeling of Draper Hall, completed for use in the fall of 1941 . The new 
wing contains the long awaited Means Memorial Library with adequate 
space for books and readers, its furnishings provided by the class of '87; the 
enticing Rebekah Chickering Browsing Room; and above, the Social Room 
and rooms for students. Connecting the new wing with the old is the beautiful 
Bailey Dining Hall, its gracious proportions sufficing for increased numbers, 
thus fulfiling Miss Bailey's strong hope that, even with a larger school, the 
unity of the family might be preserved by this daily camaraderie. 

The Alice Carter Twitchell Guest Room in Abbey House is another 
fjtting Memorial. The last project of the old Alumnae Income Fund, in 
1939, it brought a delighted response, classmates of '86 contributing generously 
under the ever-active Mary Gorton Darling, former Association president. 
Since Alice Twitchell doted on young alumnae, it is peculiarly appropriate 
that they may now be made free to come back for field days and such great 
occasions while they still have friends in school. 

Among after-campaign developments was the merging of the special 
Fund Office with the Alumnae Office. Just in time to bear the brunt of 
responsibility in that hectic campaign year of 1937-38, Mrs. Chipman had 
been appointed alumnae secretary by the School, and elected in due form' by 
the Association as general secretary, to succeed Jane Carpenter, who held 
both titles. In 1940, Marion McPherson, of recognized business ability, who 
had been put in charge of Building Fund matters by the School, was made 
associate secretary of the Alumnae Association and took over, as director, the 
care of the new Second Century Alumnae Fund, which replaced the Alum- 

18 



nae Income Fund. Mrs. Chipman is editor of the Bulletin, and other 
duties are divided between them. One of the yearly events is the coffee 
party for seniors, instituted by Mrs. Chipman, with her natural sense of the 
value of getting people together socially and her gift for hospitality. The 
girls are always interested and surprised to see the addressograph, the stencil 
machine, the files and the record procedures, and are bound to get a little 
idea of what the Alumnae Office means. Who knows what bold spirits among 
them may be pioneers in thought or action, in their turn one of these days? 

Thus the review of the years, hurrying over fresh and familiar events, 
comes down to the present. At times the text has run ahead to follow a trail 
to its end, then doubled back to go on with the account. There have been 
many omissions: like detailed mention of the work of the later Association 
presidents, each of whom took over some current problem or issue to solve 
or carry through; and recognition of the successive assistants in the Alumnae 
Office, whose conscientious and competent handling of the daily routine 
business has been the foundation on which the whole communications 
system has rested. Between the lines also must be read grateful acknowledg- 
ment of numberless workers behind the scenes, nowhere named in the records, 
but essential to the success of every production before the footlights. 

This is the end of a chapter in the history, but it is the beginning of 
another. It is not a time for complacency, but for sober rejoicing and vigorous 
expectation of opportunities yet to come. 




!9 



Thank You! 




BURTON S. FLAGG 
Treasurer since 1906 



My dear friends, the "Alumnae of Abbot": 
You are "backing the line" while the school 
actively pursues its mission in these modern 
times. You have always reinforced its work and 
purposes to a most unusual degree and have 
responded to the school's call with rare spirit. 
Children and grandchildren of alumnae appear 
each year among the registrants at Abbot. 
Accordingly, I rejoice with all Abbot women 
who look back with pride upon its past, as well 
as look forward with great hope to its future 
and, as Treasurer, extend my deep appreciation 
for your loyalties expressed through these years 
in so many tangible and intangible ways. These 
have assisted our faculty and trustees to function 
more and more effectively. 

The wholehearted endorsement of The 
Bulletin delighted me. Through its columns the alumnae "hear from home" 
frequently and intimately. It stands today as one of the best issues of its type 
among schools for girls. 

The "Centennial Fund for Teaching" developed through a long ten- 
year pull under the devoted and dynamic leadership of Miss Alice C. Twitch- 
ell, Abbot '86, stands as a monument to alumnae loyalty and belief in the 
fundamental aspects of "Abbot life." It has brought Abbot women closer 
together. In the year 1929 the Trustees voted that this fund "be regarded as 
the foundation for a general program of development . . . designed to meet 
the more vital needs of the institution and includes, increase in teaching, 
scholarship and other endowments, the improvement of present dormitory 
and dining room facilities, the erection, equipment and endowment of the 
'Means Memorial Library'." All of these objectives are in process as gifts 
permit and are indicative of an able, alert and devoted body of alumnae who 
live up to the highest traditions of their training and responsibilities. 



None of us can look back 
Association three-quarters of a 
singleminded and unwearying 
Abbot 1 858, and our own Jane 
patriotic in their administration 
years and of their personalities 
Commencements and alumnae 
their achievements. 



with softened vision to the first days of the 
century ago, but we do think today of the 

interest of women like Miss Agnes Park, 
Carpenter, Abbot 1892, thorough, loyal and 
of the Secretary's tasks over a long spread of 
so delightfully associated with many, many 

gatherings. We delight to honor them for 



Are we at the "home base" acquainting you sufficiently with our needs 
so that you may be as conversant as possible with the condition of the school? 



20 



This close interest means much in happiness, encouragement and stimulus 
to those who carry on its work, for the school grows in power by judicious 
re-examination and re-appraisal of its real mission, methods and means. 
How are we doing? 

Abbot has loyal alumnae, a competent teaching force, excellent student 
attitudes, a 1 1 8 year record, and a high sense of her mission. I foresee this 
strong bond, already seasoned, capable of carrying the Association over 
another seventy-five years. 

Abbot's call is for the best! May she realize the full symbolism of her 
work! 



^£dL^Uo~^J&r&- 





21 




The Alumnae Trustees, elected to the Board of Trustees, on nomination 
by the Alumnae Association, bring to the Board not only their personal 
services and counsel but through them come the opinions of the former stu- 
dents whom they represent. 

Their membership emphasizes the importance which the alumnae play 
in the Academy life and development — a link between "Abbot girls" and 
Abbot the institution. 

The Board is glad of this opportunity to acknowledge its indebtedness 
to all Alumnae Trustees past and present. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 



* Grace Garleton Dryden '86 
Anna Nettleton Miles '93 
Dorothy Bigelow Arms ' 1 1 
Mira B. Wilson 'io 
Winona Algie '00 
Dorothy Taylor '08 
Polly Bullard Holden '24 
Margaret Van Voorhis ' 1 8 
Helen Allen Henry '32 



1 9 16-192 1 
1921-1926 
1926-193 1 

I 93 I " I 93 6 

I 93 6 " I 942 

1 939- 1 945 
1 942- 1 948 

1 945- 1 95 l 

E. Barton Ghapin, President 
Irving Southworth, Clerk 



^Deceased 



22 



The Trustees of Abbot Academy 



Edward Barton Chapin . A.B. . President 
Andover 

Irving Southworth. A.B.. Clerk 
Andover 

Burton Sanderson Flagg. A.B.. Treasurer 
Andoi 

Marguerite Capen Hearsey, Ph.D.. Principal 
Andover 

George E. Abbot. A.B. 
Brookline 

Constance Parker Chipman 
Andover 

Mrs. Wilbur K.Jordan 
Cambridge 

The Rev. Sidney Lovett, D.D. 

Chaplain of Yale University 



Margaret Shove Morriss. Ph.D.. LL.D. 

Dean of Pembroke College in Brown 
University 

c j . : c . F:: ;r. Ss.'/rve: . A.B.. M.B.A. 
Ando' 

Stoddard M. Stevens. Jr. 
Short HOb. X. J. 

Mira Bigelow Wilson. B.D.. M.A. 

Principal of Xorthfield School for Girls 

ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 

Helen Allen Henry, A.B. 
Weston 

Margaret Van Voorbis 
New York City 



Education for One World 

Miss Hearsey. president of the National Association of Principals of 
Schools for Girls, went to Rve. New York, on March 5 to preside over the 
1946 meetings of the organization. The meetings were held in the West- 
chester Country Club, and were attended by a full membership which 
included representatives from not only distant localities in the United States, 
but a number from neighboring communities as well. Canada and Hawaii 
among them. 

The topic for discussion chosen by Miss Hearsey was ''Education for One 
World." An unusually interesting list of speakers accepted the invitation to 
take part in the meeting's. There were distinguished educators from Great 
Britain. China and other countries as well as outstanding leaders in educa- 
tional circles in this country. 

For reasons growing out of war conditions, the association had heretofore 
suspended its customary meetings, and this gathering was therefore the first 
to be held for several years. The enthusiastic attendance, the vigorous dis- 
cussion on a vital topic, and the excellence with which Miss Hearsey con- 
ducted the sessions together resulted in this having been one of the most 
rewarding gatherings in the historv of the organization. 



23 



The One Hundred and Seventeenth Commencement 

of Abbot Academy 

Friday, June seventh 
RALLY NIGHT 7.30 o'clock 

Saturday, June eighth 
ALUMNAE DAY 

Program 

Annual Meeting of the Abbot Alumnae Association in Abbot 

Hall at 1 1.30 a.m. 
Seventy-fifth anniversary luncheon in the John-Esther Art 

Gallery at 1.00 p.m. 

Speaker: Marguerite C. Hearsey 

Class reunion reports 

Presentation of "Madame Abbot Returns," dramatic poem by 

Helen Danforth Prudden 191 3 

Draper Dramatics: 'The Taming of the Shrew," Davis Hall 

at 8.00 p.m. _, . 

Sunday, June ninth 

Baccalaureate at South Church, 10.45 a - m - 

Sermon by: The Very Reverend Donald J. Campbell, S.T.M. 

Dean, Christ Church Cathedral, Springfield, Mass. 
Commencement Concert, Davis Hall at 7.30 p.m. 

Monday, June tenth 

Graduation Exercises at South Church, 10.00 a.m. 
Address by: The Rev. Vivian T. Pomeroy, D.D., Milton 

GLASS REUNION CHAIRMEN 

1886 Harriet Raymond Brosnan (Mrs. John B.), 70 Arlington St., Haverhill 
1 89 1 Annie Bull Hardenbergh (Mrs. Daniel B.), 7 Orchard St., Middletown, 

N. Y. 
1896 Lillian Franklin Carr (Mrs. Ernest L.), 34 Russell St., Milton 
1 90 1 Evelyn Carter Giles (Mrs. Howard), South Woodstock, Vt. 
1906 Ruth Adams Downer (Mrs. Guy W.), 72 Mechanic St., Shelburne Falls 
191 1 Dorothy Bigelow Arms (Mrs. Clarence), 12 Beechmont St., Worcester 
1916 Esther Kilton, 112 Charles St., Boston 14; Eugenia Parker, Denmark, 

Maine 
1 92 1 Marion Kimball Bigelow (Mrs. David H.), 326 Highland St., West 

Newton 
1926 M. Alice Perry, 175 Florida St., Springfield 
1 93 1 Doris Allen Carroll (Mrs. Edward R.), 31 High St., Marblehead 
1936 Anne Russell Loring (Mrs. Malcolm B.), 2 W. Maple Ave., Moores- 

town, N. J. 
1941 Sue Long Kremer (Mrs. Frederick S.), 1 172 Park Ave., New York City 

28, N. Y. 
1945 Hilary Paterson, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

24 



Alumnae Association, 1871-1946 



It is indeed an honor to be your president on this 
occasion of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the 
Alumnae Association. 

As the years go by and we become more mature, 
we appreciate to an increasing extent what Abbot 
has meant to us. Its solid foundation has given us 
the courage and stamina that is so valuable in our 
adult lives. To be an Abbot graduate is a rare 
privilege and one we shall cherish all our years. 

As we now emerge from an unprecedented and 
disastrous phase in history and stand on the brink 
of a new era we find that women have risen ever 
more valiant to find their own place in many new 
and wider fields, some even thought impossible 
heretofore; so it is for these ends that education is 
vastly more important today for the purpose of 
strengthening and broadening our youth of tomorrow. 

Let us go on with new hope and realization for the undaunted future 

Roberta Kendall Kennedy, President 




Roberta Kendall Kennedy 
President of the Alumnae 
Association, 1942 to 1946 



Past Presidents of the Abbot Alumnae Association 



1871 * Susanna E. Jackson I9 X 6 

1877 *Abby Chapman Ghamberlin 191 8 

1890 * Emily A. Means 1922 

1898 *Emma Meacham Davis 1926 

1906 * Catherine Buss Tyer r 93° 

1908 * Ellen Chamberlin Blair x 934 

1 910 *Anna L. Dawes x 938 

1 914 * Henrietta Learoyd Sperry x 942 

*Deceased 



Julia E. Twichell 
Mary Gorton Darling 
* Edith Dewey Jones 
Constance Parker Chipman 
Annie Smart Angus 
Norma Allen Haine 
Mildred Frost Eaton 
Roberta Kendall Kennedy 



Alumnae Day Committees 

Nominating Committee: Helen Abbott Allen, chairman; Annie Smart 
Angus, Elizabeth Boyce. 

75th Anniversary Luncheon Reservations: Marion Mellor Dean, chairman; 
Helen Hamblet Dyer, Cornelia Sargent Battershill. 

Flowers: Ruth Clark Weaver, chairman; Elizabeth Weaver Hockmeyer, 
Phyllis Brooks Stevens. 



25 



Abbot Club: 



Abbot Clubs deserve the full support of all alumnae in the centers in which they 
are organized. A few are working for many. Successful meetings have been held 
by the Boston, New York and Old Colony Clubs. It is hoped that every club 
listed will hold a meeting during this coming year, as a special tribute to the 

yjth anniversary of the Alumnae Association 



BOSTON (1892): President, Mrs. Gwen- 
dolyn Bloomfield Tillson '22; Vice-presidents, 
Mrs. Virginia Gay d'Elseaux '28; Mrs. 
Elizabeth Sage Batchelder '33; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. Louise Risley Floyd '37; 
Corresponding Secretary, Nancy Kelley '41; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Nay Gramkow '27; 
Auditor, Mrs. Mary Piper Sears '28; Program 
Chairman, Mrs. Faith Chipman Parker '31; 
Directors 1 946-1 948, Barbara Goss '22, Mary 
Howard '40, Jacqueline Proctor de Brun '40. 
Directors 1945- 1947, Mrs. Lydia Kunkel 
Eldredge '21, Miss Irene Atwood '18, Mrs. 
Ruth Baker Johnson '30. 

The annual spring meeting was held on 
Saturday, April 13, at the College Club, 
Boston. Following the social period with 
dessert-coffee, an interesting talk, "Preview 
of Post War Fashion," was given by Miss 
Helen I. Whittet, of the Chamberlain 
School of Retailing. 

CHICAGO (1921): President, Mrs. J. 
Allen Lind (Mary Simpson); Secretary, Mrs. 
Edith Bullen Creeden, 461 Hill Rd., Win- 
netka; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Hall Walker. 

CONNECTICUT (1923): President, Miss 
Sara Peck, 20 Fairview Ter., Derby; Secre- 
tary- Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Lawton Cheney, 
36 Morse St., Hamden. 

DETROIT (1922): President, Mrs. Thom- 
as Nalle (Harriet Balfe) ,1211 Willow Lane, 
Birmingham. 

MAINE, EASTERN (1926): President, 
Miss Eleanor Bird, 250 Broadway, Rockland; 
Vice-president, Mrs. Frances McDougall Mc- 



Loon; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Annetta 
Richards Bryant, 64 State St., Brewer. 

A meeting is being planned for early 
summer. 

MAINE, WESTERN (1922): President, 
Mrs. Harold Robinson (Harriette Woolver- 
ton), Cape Elizabeth; Treasurer, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Baldwin Frohock. 

NEW YORK (1898): President, Miss 
Gertrude Holbrook '25; Vice-presidents, Mrs. 
Laura Scudder Williamson '24, Mrs. Helga 
Lundin Buttrick '23; Recording Secretary, Mrs. 
Grace Leyser Boynton '19; Corresponding 
Secretary, Mrs. Jane Owsley Warwick '30; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Ruth Cann Baker '31; 
Directors, Mrs. Helen Bradley Hodgkinson 
'19, Mrs. Eunice Meigs Pease '21, Mrs. 
Ethel Thompson James '24; Auditor, Mrs. 
Despina Plakias Messinesi '29. 

OHIO, CENTRAL (1921): President, 
Secretary, Mrs. Paul Meek (Louise Norpell), 
5600 Meek Rd., Worthington. 

OHIO, CLEVELAND (1927): President, 
Mrs. George Worthington (Madeleine Fiske), 
Chesterland, Ohio. 

OLD COLONY (1924): President, Mrs. 
Ruth Murray Moore; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Mrs. Martha Wind Finger. 

PITTSBURGH (1921): President, Mrs. 
George H. Jackson (Gertrude Miller), But- 
ler, Pa.; Secretary, Mrs. Joseph M. Browne 
(Eliza Atwell), 529 Pine Rd., Sewickley. 



26 



In Memoriam 



1875 

Helen Fairbank, Mrs. George R. R. Riv- 
ers, died on October 19, 1945, in Santa 
Barbara, Calif. 

1876 

Ida Nims Butterfield died on November 

21, 1945- 

1877 

Harriet E. Cobb died on February 13, in 
Brookline. 

1879 

Jeannette M. Hart died on March 5. 
L. Alice Pike, Mrs. Horace F. Buxton, 
died on October 6, 1945. 

1883 

Lucia Watkins, wife of the late Edwin A. 



Bayley, died on February 13, in Lexington. 
She was the mother of Marian Bayley Buchan- 
an 1913, and grandmother of Lucia Bayley 
Buchanan 1939. 

1888 

Caroline Zelie, widow of James N. Stanley 
died on January 9, 1945. 

1892 

Josephine Crocker, Mrs. Jean de Teplow, 
sister of * Catherine Crocker 1887, died in 
Wellesley, in 1945. 

1893 

Bertha Johnson, wife of Harold M. Ren- 
der, died on September 19, 1945, in Worces- 
ter. 



Class News 



Alumnae come all ages 
From ninety to eighteen! 
All news from each is vital 
And on you all we lean. 

To make your class notes peppy 
And readers pages turn — 
Please send your news this summer, 
From each you much may learn! 

1871 
Seventy-fifth Anniversary 

Helen E. Melendy sends her greetings over 
a span of seventy-five years. "I entered 
Abbot in 1869 with the class of '71 . I did not 
graduate as I was compelled to leave Abbot 
because of poor health. I am ninety-three 
years of age and as my eyesight is failing I 
am unable to read or write, but I send my 
very best wishes." 

1874-1890 

Class Funds Secretary: Mrs. Ernest C. 
Young (Ruth Childs), 6 Emerson St., 
Brookline. 

1876 
Seventieth Anniversary 
Dear Class of '76: I imagine I am the last 
leaf on the tree of 1876, that grew in Andover 



and how almost daily those old time im- 
pressions have borne definite blossom and 
fruit in our lives and actions. 

How often a swift mental glimpse of Abbot 
Hall, Old Oak, or Maple Walk have in- 
fluenced a daily task; how grateful we are for 
those teachings! 

I am proud to have my granddaughter 
enter soon, following two daughters of 1910 
and 191 7. May years to come repeat the 
many good old time effects of this school ever 

faithfully. Harriet Chapell Newcomb 

1885 

In a recent letter to Miss Hearsey, Fannie 
Hardy Eckstorm draws convincing con- 
clusions on the purpose of education. We 
quote: 

"I believe there was much in the older 
curricula, which insisted upon thoroughness 
in a few fundamentals before allowing much 
individual choice. Yet a certain amount of 
freedom is essential to securing best use of 
special talents. And in certain very important 
studies, like history, it is hard to get the 
rigid drill needed in grinding a good tool. 
It is hard also in English, though a good 
teacher will demand precision and secure 
good results. Abbot had an excellent course 
of study even in my day, when science was 



27 



There is real joy in giving and . 



only beginning to be taught by anything 
except text-books committed to memory. 
Undoubtedly it is much better now, and will 
give equivalents to the classics in many 
points. However, to me the real education 
begins when the student, guided by an expert, 
begins to pull on the bit and take his own 
pace, waste a little time on the things he can 
do best and plan to prepare for some creative 
task. 

"Education is like food, only what you can 
digest does you any good. Therefore no 
system can be devised which will work 
equally well for all pupils; but what none 
can escape is the cultural, social background 
shared by all; and the spiritual uplift which 
many will derive from the feast offered is the 
real reward of the faithful teacher. Instead 
of telling you what it might be good to do, 
is it not better to tell you what Abbot of 




long ago did for me, even though I was but 
a bird of passage and not a graduate? With- 
out it I should probably have had no Greek! 
And my Greek has done me a great deal of 
good by not using it! Like food, it was turned 
into strength in other directions; and with 
that strength, I have done my work in the 
world." 

1886 
Sixtieth Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frank W. 
Darling (Mary Gorton), Hampton, Virginia. 

Reunion chairman, Harriet Raymond 
Brosnan, 70 Arlington St., Haverhill. 

1891 
Fifty-fifth Reunion 

Class of '91 will meet at the Alumnae 
Luncheon on June 8. Plan to be present. 

Annie Bull Hardenbergh 

Reunion chairman 
Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Daniel B. 
Hardenbergh (Annie Bull), 7 Orchard St., 
Middletown, N. Y. 

1892 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane B. Car- 
penter, School St., Andover. 



Mrs. Harry R. 
4 Rock Ledge 



MARY GORTON DARLING 

The Spirit of '86 



1893 

Class Fund Secretary: 
Miles (Anna Nettleton), 
Drive, Stamford, Conn. 

Judge Nelson P. Brown, husband of 
Margaret Tucker, died on April 10, in Bos- 
ton. Judge Brown was acting chief justice 
of the Mass. Superior Court and one of the 
state's most prominent legal authorities. 

1894 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Doremus 
Scudder (Mabel Bosher), 133 West Ninth 
St., Claremont, Cal. 

Mrs. Scudder is spending the next six 
months with friends in the Hawaiian Islands. 

1896 
Fiftieth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Lillian Franklin Carr, 
34 Russell St., Milton, who reports that six 
members of '96 expect to attend reunion. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Henry V. 
Conant (Ruth Loring), 914 High St., Ded- 
ham. 

May Toung Duffy's grandson is attending 
Phillips Academy, and her younger son 



28 



. . . here is an opportunity to prove it. 




THE CLASS OF 1896 



George has returned from India where he 
served with the Engineers. 

1897 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Alexander 
Bunce (Gertrude Ware), R.F.D. 1, Rock- 
ville, Conn. 

1898 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert W. 
Dunbar (Selina Cook), 3 Elk St., Apt. 7, 
Albany, N. Y. 

1899 

Frederick W. Hill, husband of Maboth 
Wolfenden, died on March 7, in Attleboro. 

1900 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur P. 
Spear (Grace Chapman), 156 Winchester 
St., Brookline. 

1901 
Forty-fifth Reunion 
Reunion chairman: Evelyn Carter Giles, 
South Woodstock, Vt. 

Delight Hall Gage is tutoring in Remedial 



Reading and in Mathematics at her home in 
Andover. 

Margaret Reed Stuttiford is anticipating 
her first class reunion in many years. She 
has recently retired from many years of 
teaching at the Kimberly School in Mont- 
clair, N. J., where she was head of the pri- 
mary department. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Helen Hale, 
86 Knox St., Lawrence. 

1902 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Hezekiah 
Poore (Mildred Mooers), 37 Ames St., 
Lawrence. 

1904 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. William O. 
Pettit (Elizabeth Winsor), 186 Livingston 
Ave., Brunswick, N.J. 

1905 

Mrs. John N. Cole, mother of Elizabeth 
Cole, died in Andover on February 9. 

Katherine Woods writes, "I am now 
doing the translation of Consuelo de Saint- 



29 



Your gift to the Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund 



Exupery's book, Oppede, it will have a 
different title in English, and (following my 
translation of Antoinne de Saint-Exupery's 
lovely allegory, The Little Prince), I hope to 
go on with work of this sort. In fact I have 
given up editorial work, and I hope to have 
a book of my own ready for 1947 publica- 
tion." 

1906 
Fortieth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Ruth Adams Downer, 
72 Mechanic St., Shelburne Falls, Mass. 

Alice Barbour Merrill says she hopes to 
attend reunion. Her daughter Martha 
Merrill Shattuck has a son Bradlee Merrill 
Shattuck, born August 20, 1945. 

Helen Ellis Rice will report six grand- 
children at reunion, "four girls and two boys 
ranging in age from six years to ten months 
and divided among four daughters. Two of 
the granddaughters are children of Helen 
Rice Wiles, Abbot '33." 

Molly Jordan Goodrich's daughter Joan 
Goodrich Lang has a son Frederic Jordan 
Lang, born February 7. 

George W. Mackintire, father of Persis 
Mackintire Carr died March 10 in Worcester. 

Maud Sprague hopes to be at the Alumnae 
Luncheon. 

1906 expects to have ten members present 
at their reunion. 

1907 

Earl J. Walker, husband of Margaret Hall, 
died on February 5, in Evanston, 111. 

1910 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Myron G. 
Darby (Ethel Reigeluth), 110 Tanglewylde 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

1911 
Thirty-fifth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Dorothy Bigelow 
Arms, 12 Beechmont St., Worcester. 

You have each received a personal letter 
urging thought about returning for our 
reunion! Five replies have been received so 
far. Where is yours? I hound the postman! 

Biggie 

Maud Gutterson Green says she will work 
on Rhoda and return with her for Com- 
mencement. Corinne says she hopes she can 
come and Rebecca says she will definitely 



be there. Also Jessie Jones, Margaret Cope- 
land, and Edith Donald. 

Charlotte Gowing Cooper is now head 
Occupational Therapist at the Veterans 
Administration Hospital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Frances Pray is working from 4 a.m. to 
7 p.m. at the Lynn Hospital, but will come 
to reunion. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Douglas 
Donald (Edith Johnson), 8 Carisbrooke St., 
Andover. 

1912 

Marion Willis Davidson lives at Sheffield, 
Mass. Her youngest boy is in the Navy, 
oldest is in the Army Air Force, "Bob" has 
seen service in the Canadian R.A.F., and 
another is an army Lt. She lost her only 
daughter. 

1913 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Margaret 
Wilkins, 279 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 

Helen Danforth Prudden's son Lt. (jg) 
Peter D. Prudden was married to Betsy 
Goodwin Pritchard, January 26. 

Mary Erving Lindsay announces the 
arrival of a grandson, John Walker Lindsay, 
born on January 6, to her son, Capt. John 
Abbott Lindsay. Capt. Lindsay is studying 
Chinese at the University of Cal. 

1915 

Mattie Larrabee Whittemore rejoices over a 
new granddaughter Jane Booth Fellows, 
born to Carol Whittemore Fellows '38, on 
March 26. 

Your correct address is your life line to 
Abbot. Keep the Alumnae Office informed! 

1916 
Thirtieth Reunion 

Reunion chairmen: Esther Kilton, 112 
Charles St., Boston 14; Eugenia Parker, 
Denmark, Maine. 

A great time is being planned for those 
who attend reunion, but only a few have 
replied to notices. Write the chairmen at 
once. 

Charlotte Eaton is Director of Volunteer 
Nurses at the Providence Lying-in Hospital. 
She plans to attend reunion. 

Marjorie Freeman Heck reports her 19 year- 



3° 



during this 75th Anniversary Celebration 



old son is still in the Air Service stationed in 
Naples. 

Dorothy Higgins Rand is boasting of a 
"grandson with red hair, will have another 
by June!" 

Ruth Laton Greesy's husband, Brig. Gen. 
Creesy has taken command of the Marine 
Corps Depot of Supplies at San Francisco. 

Dorothy Gilbert Bellows is proud of her 
daughter Barbara's work as a club Director 
of the Red Gross at the Tulln Air Base near 
Vienna. Her son James who was a Fighter 
Pilot in the Pacific is out of service and back 
in college. 

Frances Moses Schubert writes from Rock- 
ville Center, N. Y., "Our twenty-three-year- 
old son is still in service in Texas, after six 
months in Germany during the war as a 
corporal in the army. Our twenty-one-year- 
old son is now studying electrical engineering 
at Cornell University, after serving twenty 
months in England, France and Germany 
as a sergeant in the Signal Corps with the 
9th Air Force. Have a grand time celebrat- 
ing our 30th, I'll be thinking of you all and 
wishing I was there." 

Katharine Odell Randall's son, H. Harri- 
son Randall II, returned in January from 
two years' service overseas in the Normandy 
and European campaigns, and has now re- 
entered Bowdoin College. 

Dorothy Pillsbury Bartlett writes of en- 
joying a grandson, and her anticipation of 
reunion. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. James E. 
Downs (Laura Cheever), Bancroft Rd., 
Andover. 

Time to enter that daughter in Abbot for 
1947 and 1948! 

1917 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Oliver D. 
Wescott (Dorothy Small), 84 Main St., 
Nantucket. 

Married: Dorothy Baxter Reynolds to 
Joseph Singerly Lare, April 2. 

Esther Davis Smith reports her sons all 
safely out of the service. "Our son Andrew, 
was a corporal after five years of service; 
David, a Lt. Comdr. after four years, and 
Ensign Philip, a Navy combat Pilot of three 
years. The last two have returned to Wil- 



liams College. Esther (aff. .'44) is a student 
nurse at the Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, in New York City. 

Mary Shipman Mian's book, "My Country- 
in-Law," reminiscences of her life in Creuse 
in France, has just been published. 

1918 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George J. 
Cutler (Velma Rowell), 45 Eliot St., Jamaica 
Plain. 

Frank W. Atwood, father of Irene At- 
wood, died on March 5, in Pasadena, Cal. 

1919 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Grace L. 
Boynton (Grace Leyser), 30 Engle St., 
Tenafly, N. J. 

1920 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Beverly R. 
Hubbard (Muriel Moxley), 172 Putnam 
Ave., Hamden, Conn. 

Paula Miller Patrick's oldest son is attend- 
ing Deerfield Academy. Her husband has 
returned from Europe and is out of the 
army, but remains a reserve officer. 

1921 
Twenty-fifth Reunion 

A Twenty-fifth reunion comes only once 
in a life-time! Fifteen are definitely coming. 
Don't miss our reunion supper on June 8, 
following the big luncheon. Please write to 
the chairman if you are planning to come. 
Marion Kimball Bigelow, 
326 Highland St., 

West Newton 

Helen Roser is assistant executive secretary 
of the American Nurses' Association Pro- 
fessional Counseling and Placement Service, 
which is an educational project to improve 
the quality and quantity of nursing service 
throughout the country, and to improve 
personnel practices in nursing. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. David H. 
Bigelow (Marion Kimball), 326 Highland 
St., West Newton. 

1922 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. Evans Kep- 
hart (Ruth Hill), 23 Lyme Rd., Hanover, 
N. H. 

Juliet Haskell Carrington sends news from 
Washington of her family and work. Her 



3 1 



will be devoted to scholarships 



nineteen year-old daughter is a sophomore 
at Middlebury College, and son, seventeen, 
is in his last year at St. Albans School in 
Washington. She has a degree B.S. in Agri- 
culture with entomology major. She is now 
a marketing specialist with the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, working particularly 
on marketing agreement programs for citrus 
fruits. 



1928 



1923 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Sterling Dow 
(Elizabeth Flagg), 36 Holden St., Cam- 
bridge. 

1924 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. John 
Holden (Polly Bullard), 39 No. Pleasant St., 
Middlebury, Vt. 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Myron W. Roberts 
(Olive Mitchell) a daughter, Virginia 
Adams, February 12. This is the fifth girl in 
the family. 

1925 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George B. 
Beveridge (Charlotte Hanna), Sanfordtown 
Rd., Redding, Conn. 

1926 
Twentieth Reunion 

Hope to see you all at our 20th reunion 
on June 8. Plan to meet at the annual meet- 
ing and luncheon, and to have supper with 
the school. Be sure that you have sent in your 
reservations, so we may all sit together. 
M. Alice Perry, 
Reunion Chairman 
175 Florida St., Springfield 

Jane Hovey plans to return from a winter 
in California in time to attend reunion. 

Florence MacDougall Ranny is president 
of the White School P.T. A. in Springfield. 

Ruth Katzmann Pope returned to this 
country last year after four years internment 
in Germany with her son. She lives now with 
her father in Hyde Park. 

Patricia Goodwillie Blanchard sends her 
regrets that she cannot attend reunion. She 
has a busy life with three children, David, 
nine; Joan, seven; and Peter, six. Her hus- 
band is rector of the Episcopal Church in 
Columbia, Mo. 

1927 

Married: Aylmer Stantial to James A. 
Kempton on March 16. 



3 2 



Class Fund Secretary: Miss Emily Sloper, 
56 Russell St., New Britain, Conn. 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. John J. Parker 
(Frances Gould) a third child and first son, 
John Jackson 3rd, December 21, 1945. 

1929 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Charles O. Black 
(Louise Hollis) a daughter, Louise, March 7. 

Born to: Lt. and Mrs. Henry D. Tiffany 
Jr. (Cleone Place) a daughter, Cleone Gor- 
don, March 20. 

1930 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Jack R. War- 
wick (Mary Jane Owsley), 26 Ledgewood 
Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Leidy 
(Kathryn Dutton) a son, Thomas Dutton, 
February 23. 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. James L. Sullivan 
(Frances Sullivan) a daughter, Nancy Eliza- 
beth, October 13, 1945. 

Married: Elizabeth Walworth to Lt. 
Robert Ross, July 11, 1942. She would be 
"glad to welcome any Abbot friends to our 
first peace-time abode at 5 Crawford St., 
Cambridge." 

When you have found that house or apart- 
ment notify the Alumnae Office at once. 



1931 
Fifteenth Reunion 

There is still time to make plans for re- 
union! We want the class there one hundred 
per cent, if not in person, in spirit, so if you 
can not be with us, won't you write us a 
note. Many of the girls are planning to come 
back. Wouldn't you like to see Peg and 
Faith, Abby and Marcia, Ruth Cann Baker 
with her grown-up daughter, Mary Bacon 
and Emily Bullock? Emily is planning a 
get-together at her home. 

It's a date for June Eighth! 

Doris Allen Carroll, 
Reunion Chairman 
31 High St., Marblehead 

Hoping also to be present at reunion are 
Barbara Graham Holland, Mary Henderson 
Lee, and Marcia Rudd Kiel. Barbara writes, 
"We are civilians again and expect to locate 






for Abbot Alumnae Daughters. 



in Lansing, Mich., whenever we can find a 
house." 

Mary Henderson Lee has two daughters 
Nancy Elizabeth, three, and Barbara Ann, 
born June 18, 1945. 

Nancy Carr Holmes' husband has left for 
duty in Japan, where she expects to join him 
later. She is staying for the present with her 
parents in Bridgewater. 

Constance Chamberlaine Harris is moving 
to Charlottesville, Va., her husband being 
now out of the service. She has a daughter 
Constance Susan, two years old. 

Peggy O'Leary White hopes to come. 

Frances Scudder Glisson is living in At- 
lanta, Ga., where her husband is specializing 
in Obstetrics and Gynecology. They have 
two sons, Charles Stedman Glisson III, four 
years, and John Scudder just three years old. 

Janet Simon Smith wrote doubtfully of 
coming but may be urged. 

Gertrud Van Peursem Bell writes that 
present and anticipated family responsibil- 
ities will keep her at home. Her husband 
is with General Electric in Schenectady, and 
her home in Ballston Lake, N. Y. 

Class Fund Secretry: Mrs. Francis Hol- 
land (Barbara Graham), 218 West Marion 
Rd., South Bend, Ind. 

1932 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Dorothy 
Richardson, Boston Rd., Billerica. 

Engaged: Marietta Marshall to Dr. John 
A. Dudis. 

1934 

Anne Place Mason is living in New Canaan, 
Conn., after living "for the most part of 
seven years on ranches in Texas and Wy- 
oming breeding cattle, and have hunted big 
game in the Rockies when there was a 
scarcity of meat. Summers we always spend 
at Chatham, Cape Cod. I have been oc- 
cupied with the care of my platinum- 
haired son and daughter, Peter, six, and 
Pamela, four." 

1935 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McM. 
Hinshaw (Mary Barlow) a daughter, Anne 
Stuart, December n, 1945. 

Ann Hurlburt Bradley's husband has had 
two exhibitions of his work in New York 
City. She has two children, Lynn, five, and 



Rickie, two. At last report they were bound 
for Colorado for skiing and painting. 

Shirley Smith King reports a second child, 
a daughter, Avis Steele, born October 9, 
1945. Toddy is three and a half years old. 
She writes, "My husband and I have bought 
a little summer home in South Harpswell, 
Maine, where we will spend the month 
of August. If any friends are in that vicinity 
I would love to have them look us up." 

Engaged: Helen H. Tower to Joseph 
Stritmatter. 

1936 
Tenth Reunion 

Attention 36'ers. I do hope you have re- 
ceived and answered your cards and sent in 
lots of news for the next Bulletin. My 
apologies for not sending cards before, but 
ray husband got home, we found a house, 
started to settle and then took a two-week 
vacation in New England, stopping at Abbot 
to greet old friends, and showing my husband 
where I'd like one of our daughters to go. 
What terrific changes have been made in 
routine! And the new wing is beautiful. You 
have to see it to appreciate it. Do hope lots 
of you will return on June 8 for the Alumnae 
luncheon, after which we'll have a class tea 
at Fieldstones. Looking forward to seeing 

Anne Russell Loring, 
Reunion Chairman 
2 West Maple Ave., 
Morristown, N. J. 
Betty Jamison Crandell sends her regrets. 
"Have a four-year-old boy John Underhill 
Crandell Jr., and daughter nine months old, 
Cathy Wheeler Crandell. I am afraid I will 
have to miss our 10th as I will be away. 
Have fun and few laughs for me. 

Send personal news items for the October 
Bulletin. The editors depend on you: 

1937 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur W. 
Tucker (Martha Elizabeth Ransom), 632 
Great Plain Rd., Needham. 

Married: Nancy Burns to Lt. John Joseph 
McArdle, February 23, in Andover. 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Sydney P. Harrison 
(Jeannette Partridge) a son, Sydney P. Jr., 
March 17. 



33 



Its purpose and use are restricted . 



1938 

Jeanne Sawyer Faggi is living in Ballard- 
vale. 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Fellows 
(Carol Whittemore) a third child and second 
daughter, Jane Booth, March 26. 

Engaged: Marie Winsor Appleby to 
Malcolm Douglas Severance. Mr. Severance 
was with the Army Air Forces. 

1939 

Barbara Bellows is in charge of Red Cross 
work at Tulln Air Base, just outside of 
Vienna, where she has been since August 
1945. She recently had "leave" and went to 
Switzerland where she enjoyed the skiing at 
St. Moritz. 

Engaged: Mary Anne Patterson to Dr. 
William S. Hannan. 

Engaged: Audrey Rugg to Frank J. 
Shanaberg. 

Mary Woodman O'Hagan writes that she 
hopes to "come back to the states in a month 
or two. Practically the first place I shall visit 
after dumping the children in Granny's lap 
will be Abbot." Mary's address is 1 1 Watuk- 
loof Rd., Pretoria, So. Africa. 

1940 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Mary Howards 
14 Ware St., Cambridge. 

Engaged: Barbara Fowler to Robert 
George Borden Jr. 

Doris Sawyer Hoar and her husband have 
bought a house in North Acton, and antici- 
pate having a place for Stephanie and the 
dogs to roam. 

Ann Schoepflin Ryder's husband has been 
discharged from the Navy and they are living 
in California. 



A correct address is a life line. Have we 
yours? 

1941 
Fifth Reunion 

Hey group: I'm not complainin' and I'm 
not braggin', but move over and let the spirit 
of joy in — that's not I but the spirit of Abbot 
days. We've had a good turnout, now come 
on all you who have said "no", come cele- 
brate with us "yesses." We'll miss you if 



you're not at the reunion and for those who do 
arrive at the halls of Abbot — let the imagina- 
tion frame the picture. I wonder what was 
in that treasure we buried? See you soon. 

Sue Long Kremer, 
1 1 72 Park Ave., 
New York City 28 
Married: Jeannette Biart Scofield to Lt. 
David Warren, February 2. She expects to 
live in Norwich, Conn, as her husband works 
as a sales engineer in New York City. 

Ruth Bondy Lowry met her husband in 
California on his return from the So. Pacific. 
She is uncertain about reunion. 

Miriam Colder Dunn says, "For almost five 
years I've talked about going back to the 5th 
reunion at Abbot. If only we didn't live so 
far away in Garden City, Kan. Would so 
love to see you all and Abbot again but I'm 
afraid I'll only be there in spirit." 

Born to: 2nd Lt. and Mrs. Henry D. 
Altorfer (Mary Elizabeth Erkhart) a son, 
Stephen Henry, February 16. While her 
husband is serving overseas in the Philip- 
pines as navigator for a B-29 crew, she is 
living with her parents in Peoria, 111. 

Nancy Gerrish MacFayden and her hus- 
band are in Williamstown where he has 
resumed his studies at Williams College. 

Jo Hartwell Boddington says, "give all the 
Group my love and I'll be thinking of you 
in June." 

Dorothy Harvey sends her regrets. 
Doris Jones Hannegan plans to attend 
reunion. "Have lost contact with so many 
people I hope to see at reunion. Bob has 
been discharged and we're living a routine 
life trying to keep up with the two 'wild 
Indians,' and believe me it's a job in itself— 
but lots of fun." 

Betty Harris Day hopes to be at reunion. 
Nancy Kelley has started a two-year grad- 
uate course at Simmons School of Social 
Work in Boston. "Of course I shall be at 
every event of the reunion." 

Peggy Little Dice is teaching English to 
freshmen at the University of Michigan, is 
sorry to miss reunion. 

Mary Martin expects to be present. 
Julie Nelson Williams writes, "I will defin- 
itely be at Commencement. Wouldn't miss 
it for anything. Red has his old job back 
with a tobacco Co. He's going to South 
Africa in March for the market." 



34 



but its effect boundless! 



Vernice Moody has sent a most interesting 
account of her work at the Walter Reed 
General Hospital where she is on the staff 
of the Physical Therapy Dept. She teaches 
boys to use their artificial limbs. She says 
"whoever thinks such work would be de- 
pressing should see my prize patient with 
both legs amputated above the knee and 
right arm amputated at the shoulder stride 
across the floor on his wooden legs." 

Polly Packard Blackmore is in Madison, 
Wise, where her husband is in graduate 
school and doing some time teaching and 
recreation supervision at the Madison Civic 
Center. She is still taking voice lessons, and 
finds "homemaking a completely satisfying 
outlet for all my energies and talents." 

Emily Ruth Poynter expects to be at 
reunion. 

Eloise Perkins Blizzard and her husband 
have bought a plantation in Milledgeville, 
Ga., where they are planning to be truck 
farmers. 

Married: Jane Parrot to Arthur Kerr 
Brown Jr., March 2, in Summit, N.J. 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Floyd M. Shumway 
(Peggy Rabling) a second child, Jean Todd, 
February 24. Spencer Thomas is now almost 
three years old. Peggy has been all during 
the war and at present in charge of four Red 
Cross production rooms in and around Fair- 
field, Conn. She is also on the board of the 
Little Garden Club of Conn., and recently 
was general chairman of the annual flower 
show. 

Ellie Rafton says "will probably attend 
our 5th reunion. Hope to locate a job in 
social case work in or around Boston." 

Born to: Lt. and Mrs. Stanley M. Vermeil 
(Louella Sommer) a son, Donald Edward, 
February 1. 

Joan Waugh is working for an advertizing 
agency in Boston "and loves it. Am looking 
forward to the 5th reunion and hope most 
of the class of '41 will be on hand." 

Dotty White Wicker has been travelling 
around with Ed. and Johnny, fourteen- 
month -old child. Hopes she may attend 
reunion. 

Edith White is taking the Radcliffe Man- 



agement Training Course and expects to get 
her certificate around June 10, so may have 
to miss reunion. 

Nancy Whittier Atkinson's husband is with 
the Seabees in Manila. She hopes to come 
to Abbot for reunion. 

Bonney Wilson Hakanson plans definitely 
for reunion. 

1942 

Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Ray T. Hanson 
(Patricia Daniels) a son, Daniel Victor, 
January 28. 

Engaged: Juliette Weston to Lt. Robert 
B. Suhr USNAC. Juliette plans a June 
wedding after her graduation from Stanford 
University. 

1943 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Marion Bur- 
dine, 404 N.E. 26th Terrace, Miami, Fla. 

Married: Patricia Pierpont to Richard 
Whitaker Graves Jr., USNR, February 27, 
in Watertown, Conn. 

1944 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Nancy Mc- 
Ivor, 13 Auburn St., Concord, N. H. 

Esther D. Smith (aff. '44) is a student 
nurse at the Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, at Columbia Medical Center, 
New York City. 



Please send wedding announcements to 
the Alumnae Office. 



1945 
First Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Miss Hilary Paterson, 
Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

"Hope to see as many of the class of 1945 

as possible back on June 8. Being the 75th 

anniversary of the Alumnae Association and 

what's more important (to us) our First 

reunion, it would be wonderful if we could 

get a big number together to talk everything 

over as we used to in the Senior Parlor. 

Please try to make it." 

Hilary 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Shirley Som- 
mer, 1367 Brown Hills Rd., Rockford, 111. 



35 



news! NEWS! NEWS! 



Name 



Class 



Address 



Postal District Number 



Write news about yourself and others for the October Bulletin. Tear out 
and mail before September 15, to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, 
And over, Mass. 



36 



Record of War Service 

Please Jill out and return as soon as possible to the 
Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Andover, Mass. 



Maiden Name Glass 

Married Name 

Address 

Postal District No. . 



Branch and Name of Service: Army Navy Marines 

Coast Guard Medical Air Red Cross . 



Rank: Promotions : 

Date of Entering 

Date of Discharge 

Report on Type and Place of Work Enclose Photo in Uniform 



BOSTON-ANDOVER TRAIN SERVICE 

from 

NORTH STATION, BOSTON 



DAILY 












Lv. 


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Abbot Aratomg Vnllptm 



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&§».£** 




ABBOT ALUMNAE DAUGHTERS AND RELATIVES 

(See page 8) 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



OFFICERS, 1 946- 1 948 



President 

Mrs. Frank C. d'Elseaux 
(Virginia Gay) 
12 Sheffield Rd. 
Winchester, Mass. 

Vice-presidents 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
8 Carisbrooke Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Mrs. Russell T. Loesch 
(Polly Francis) 
3 Sears Ave. 
Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Tucker 
(Martha Elizabeth Ransom) 
632 Great Plain Rd. 
Needham, Mass. 



Clerk 
Mrs. George K. Sanborn 
(Frances Flagg) 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 

Mrs, Dino Olivetti 
(Rosamond Castle) 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 

Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
5 Morton Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 
Miss Marion McPherson 
33^ Summer Street 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 

1942-1948 i945~ I 95 I 

Miss Margaret Van Voorhis Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 

304 Lexington Avenue (Helen Allen) 

New York City, N. Y. 246 Glen Road 

Weston 93, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 

Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
50 Windsor Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. J. Allen Lind 
(Mary Simpson) 
1 239 Asbury Avenue 
Winnetka, 111. 

CONNECTICUT 

Miss Sara G. Peck 
20 Fair view Terrace 
Derby, Conn. 

DETROIT 

Mrs. Thomas Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
1 2 1 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Mich. 

MAINE, EASTERN 

Mrs. John H. McLoon 
(Frances McDougall) 
1 1 1 Beech St. 
Rockland, Maine 



MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Harold Robinson 
(Harriette Woolverton) 
Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

NEW YORK 

Miss Gertrude E. Holbrook 
Stonecrest Apartments 
Larchmont, N. Y. 

OHIO CENTRAL 
Mrs. Paul Meek 
(Louise Norpell) 
Worthington, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 

Mrs. George Worthington 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 

Mrs. A. Scudder Moore 
(Ruth Murray) 
96 South Elm Street 
West Bridgewater, Mass. 

PITTSBURGH 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
515 North McKean Street 
Butler, Pa. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 14 



OCTOBER, 1946 



Issue i 



Table of Contents 



Cover photograph, Alumnae daughters and relatives 
Frontispiece: The Abbot Academy Faculty 

Abbot's i i 8th Year 

The John-Esther Gallery .... 

School Events 

The Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund 

Honor A's 

Alumnae Daughters and Relatives (on cover) 

New Alumnae Relatives 

Alumnae Daughter Graduates 1946 

Class Reunion Photographs 

Alumnae Association 

Abbot Clubs .... 

In Memoriam .... 

Class News .... 



Page 
see page 8 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

8 

8 

8 

9 
10 

14 

i7 
18 

19 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 

Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, Editor-in-Chief 

Marion McPherson, 191 8 

Virginia Gay d'Elseaux, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 




THE ABBOT ACADEMY FACULTY 

First Row, left to right: Katherine Macdonald, Phys. Ed.; Dorothy Duff, Resident Nurse; 
Gerda Kaatz, Spanish; Mildred Hatch, Latin; Marie Baratte, French; Edith A. Grassi, Latin, 
Ancient History; Mrs. Frederick Porter, Asst. Nurse; G. Amy Goodman, Secretary. 

Second Row: Germaine Arosa, French; Kate Friskin, Piano; M. Elaine Dodge, Household 
Science; Alice C. Sweeney, Acting Principal; Idanelle McMurray, English; Pauline Anderson, 
Librarian; Marion McPherson, Business Principles. 

Third Row: J. Hope Baynes, Financial Secretary; Anna E. Roth, History; Harriet L. McKee, 
Latin, Greek; Isabel Hancock, Math.; Dorothea Wilkinson, English; Hilda R. Baynes, French; 
Gwendolyn Elroy, Asst. Phys. Ed.; Bertha Morgan Gray, Dramatics. 

Top Row: Barbara Humes, Administrative Assistant; Hope Coolidge, House Supt.; Eleanor 
M. Tucker, Chemistry, Math.; Louise L. Coffin, General Science; Lucile Tuttle, Director of Resi- 
dence, English; M. Dorothy Baker, English; Mrs. Marjorie F. Stevens, Math.; Mrs. Ruth C. 
Reeves, Administrative Assistant. 

Faculty not in photograph: W. Abbott Cheever, Art; Mary Gay, History of Art; Walter E. 
Howe, Director of Music; The Rev. Alfred Burns, Bible; Louise Robinson, Asst. Financial 
Secretary; C. Jane Sullivan, Remedial Reading; Gertrude Tingley, Singing. Marguerite Hearsey, 
Principal (on leave of absence). 



Abbot's 118th Year 



On the completion of Miss Hearsey's first ten years as Principal of Abbot, 
the Trustees, in recognition of her successful administration of the affairs of 
the school especially in consideration of the unusual difficulties which came 
with the war years, have granted her a year's leave of absence. Miss Hearsey 
remained at her desk throughout the opening days, greeting old girls and 
welcoming to Abbot new girls and their parents who came with them to 
enter their daughters on the opening day. It was during the first chapel serv- 
ice of the new term when the whole school was engaged that Miss Hearsey 
drove quietly off the campus to begin her holiday. With her go the affection- 
ate good wishes of her faculty, the students, Abbot alumnae and all her 
friends near and far not connected with the school. Already her presence is 
greatly missed, but all are of one accord in feeling a sense of gratification 
that she is to enjoy a highly deserved period of rest and refreshment. She has 
promised to have a "good time" and that is what we wish for her during the 
coming months of leisure. Her plans are not completed as yet but the proba- 
bilities are that she will travel in the United States and possibly Canada, and 
visit many schools and colleges as she goes. 

The administration of the school is in competent hands: Miss Alice 
Sweeney who has been Director of Studies has been appointed Acting 
Principal, and has taken up residence in the school with apartments in 
Draper Hall. Miss Sweeney will nevertheless continue to carry on her work 
as Director of Studies in addition to her new duties. Sharing the year's re- 
sponsibilities with Miss Sweeney is 
Miss Lucile Tuttle, a former teacher of 
English at Abbot whose office is that of 
Director of Residence. Both Miss Sween- 
ey and Miss Tuttle will conduct classes 
in English. Miss Tuttle is making her 
home at Sunset Lodge. 

Abbot has commenced her 1 1 8th 
year with a full registration, one of the 
largest in the history of the school. Girls 
have come from fifteen different states 
and the District of Columbia, and 
there are students from Puerto Rico; 
the Dominion of Canada; South Amer- 
ica, and Madras, India. Moreover, 
Abbot welcomed with special warmth 
fourteen new students who are daugh- 
ters and relatives of alumnae, and whose 
names appear elsewhere in this issue of 
the Bulletin. 
ALICE CURTISS SWEENEY New appointments to the faculty are 




as follows: Miss Mildred Hatch, A.B. 
Boston University, is to assist in the ad- 
ministration office and to teach two 
classes of Latin; Miss Pauline Anderson, 
of Broadalbin, N. Y., a graduate of 
Kenka College and of the Library 
School of New York College for Teach- 
ers at Albany, is to be the librarian; 
Miss Edith A. Grassi, of Haverhill, 
A.B. Tufts College, and M.A. Wellesley 
is to teach Latin and Ancient History; 
Miss Idanelle McMurray, of Cookeville, 
Tennessee, A.B. and M.A. Vanderbilt 
University is to teach English; Miss 
Gwendolyn Elroy of Waltham, gradu- 
ate of the Bouve-Boston School is to 
teach Physical Education; Mile. Marie 
Baratte is to teach French. Mile. Bar- 
atte whose sister Marthe was on the 
Abbot faculty last year (now teaching 
at Russell Sage College) has just arrived 
in this country from her home at Porni- 
chet, France. She has received her Baccalaureat des Lettres from the College 
Universitaire de Chateau-Gomtier, and had done graduate work at the 
University of Rennes. 

Mrs. Frederick Porter R.N. New England Baptist Hospital, has been 
appointed as assistant nurse, and the Reverend Alfred Burns of Grace 
Church, Lawrence, will teach Bible. Mr. Raymond Coon, of Needham, who 
has in other years been a member of the music faculty at Abbot will again 
join Miss Friskin and Mr. Howe as teacher of pianoforte. 




LUCILE TUTTLE 



The John Esther-Gallery 

Curator: W. Abbott Cheever 



October 1 5-3 1 , Retrospective Show by Alicia Waterston 

November 1 1-25, Fifteen Modern Watercolors lent by the Museum of 

Modern Art 
January 6-22, What is Modern Painting, lent by the Museum of Modern Art 



School Events 



Tuesday. September ij, Opening of School 

Saturday, September 21. School Picnic: Old Girl-New Girl Pa: 

Sunday. September 22, Vespers: The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin. School 

Minister, Phillips Academy 
Saturday. September 28. Senior Picnic at Ipswich: Salem sightseeing trip: 

Dancers, Katya Delakova and Fred Berk 
Sunday. September 2 r j. Vespers: The Reverend Raymond Calkins. D.D.. Pastor 

Emeritus. First Church. Cambridge 
Thursday. October 3, Gargoyle -Grifhn Initiation 

Saturday. October 5. Corridor Stunts: Abbey House. Homestead, and Sherman 
Sunday. October 6, Vespers: The Reverend Whitney Hale, D.D.. Church of the 

Advent, Boston 
Saturday. October 12. Corridor Stunts: Draper Hall excluding Seniors and Day 

Scholars 
Sunday. October 13, Vespers : Abbot Christian Association 
Saturday. October i<y. Dorothy Cra^sTord, Monologuist 
Sunday. October 20, Vespers: The Reverend Roy L. Minich, D.D.. The First 

Church, Maiden 
Saturday. October 26. Lecture: "Know Yourself," by Dr. Harry P. Van Walt 
Sunday. October 2j. Vespers: The Reverend James Gordon Gilkey, D.D.. 

South Congregational Church, Springfield 
Saturday. Xovember 2. Open Forum 
Sunday. Xozember 3, Vespers: The Reverend George L. Cadigan. Grace 

Church, Salem 
Sunday. November 10. Vespers: The Reverend .Allen \\ . Clark. The Calvary 

Church, Danvers 
Saturday. Xozember 16, Field Day 
Sunday, Xozember ij. Concert by Miss Kate Friskin. Mr. Einar Hansen. Mr, 

B. Pironchi 
Sunday. Xozember 24, Vespers: The Reverend Vivian T. Pomeroy. D.D.. The 

First Parish, Milton 
Thursday. Xozember 28. Thanksgiving Day 
Saturday. Xozember 30, Lecture on Current Events. Mrs. Frank Mansfield 

Taylor 
Sunday. December 1. Vespers: Abbot Christian .Association 
Saturday. December 7, A.D.S. Play 

Sunday, December 8, Vespers: The Reverend Howard L. Rubendall. Head- 
master, Mt. Hermon School 
Saturday, December 14, Recital by Mrs. Bertha Morgan Gray 
Sunday, December 13, Christmas Service, 7.30 p.m.. Davis Hall 
Monday, December 16, Christmas Carol Service 
Tuesday, December ij, Christmas Vacation to Wednesday. January 8 



THE ABBOT SECOND CENTURY ALUMNAE FUND 



Appeal in 1946 for Alumnae Scholarships 



Two $750.00 Grants 

In celebration of the 75th Anniversary of 
the Alumnae Association the objective for 
the year 1946 has been for Alumnae Scholar- 
ships. Two alumnae daughters are now re- 
ceiving grants and we anticipate additional 
gifts from you between now and the first 
of April 1947 from which grants may be 
made during the following school year. 

Unrestricted gifts to the school enable the 
Board of Trustees to use our contributions 
when and where a need exists, and for this 
reason we shall return in 1947 to the yearly 
unrestricted giving which is so very much 
appreciated by the school. 

Class Reunion Gifts 

These gifts are not requested, but we are 
happy to say, are always made. Contribu- 
tions from individual members to the Fund 
that are made during the year of a class 
reunion, are credited to the gift made by the 
class as a group. 



Class of 1881 
1886 
1891 
1896 
1901 
1906 
1911 
1916 
1921 
1926 
1931 
1936 
1941 
1943 
1945 



$ 5.00 

400.00 

35.00 

126.00 

50 00 

30 00 

85 00 

35 00 

13 00 

121 00 

168 00 

33 00 

46 00 

125 00 

36.00 



Special Gift of $200.00 

The Abbot Academy Alumnae Associa- 
tion voted at its annual meeting on June 8, 
1946 to make a 75th Anniversary Gift of 
$200.00 to the school through the Abbot 
Second Century Alumnae Fund. 



One Yearly Appeal 

Annual gifts are solicited once each year 
through Class Fund Secretaries. The appeals 
tagether with a personal note are mailed 
during the month of March and contribu- 
tions are sent directly to the Alumnae Office 
at Abbot Academy from April 1st of the 
current year to April 1 st of the year follow- 
ing. 



Total Gifts 

Contributions 1945 $2,014 04 

Contributions $3,240 50 



(since April 1, 1946) 



Class Fund Secretaries 

Class Fund Secretaries are now elected 
by each senior class before graduation and 
continue to serve until the fifth reunion when 
another secretary is elected. When the Abbot 
Second Century Alumnae Fund was first 
organized in 1939 all secretaries were ap- 
pointed by the Alumnae Office but gradually 
secretaries elected at reunion meetings are 
taking their places. Several classes have no 
Class Fund Secretary for the coming year 
and appointments will be made by the 
Alumnae Office. 



A Word of Appreciation 

"I have a very special interest in the scholarship gifts and it is our hope that 
we shall be able to make increasingly substantial contributions to the Fund as the 
years go along. I was a scholarship student at Abbot and as I look back on my 
experiences I can say with real conviction that the contribution Abbot made to 
my growth and development is second only to the unusually thoughtful and fine 
guidance I received in my family. 

It must be true for many other Abbot girls as it was for me— Abbot served as a 
splendid transition between the dependent and sheltered life of a child in the family 
group and the independent, responsible life of an individual in her own com- 
munity." 

Member of the Class of 1933 



Class Fund Secretaries 



1874-1891 Ruth Childs (Mrs. Ernest C. Toung '09) 1918 

1886 Mary Gorton (Mrs. Frank W. Darling) 1919 

1892 Jane B. Carpenter 1920 

1893 AnnaNettleton (Mrs. Harry R. Miles) 1921 

1894 Mabel Bosher (Mrs. Doremus Scudder) 1922 

1896 Ruth Loring (Mrs. Henry V. Conant) 1923 

1897 Gertrude Ware (Mrs. Alexander Bunce) 1924 

1898 Selina Cook (Mrs. Robert Dunbar) 1925 

1899 Lilian Mooers (Mrs. Brainerd E. Smith) 1928 

1900 Grace Chapman (Mrs. Arthur P. Spear) 1930 

1901 Helen Hale 1931 

1902 Mildred Mooers (Mrs. Hezekiah P. Poore) 1932 
1904 Elizabeth Winsor (Mrs. William O. Pettit) 1933 
1906 Constance Parker (Mrs. Reeve Chipman) 1937 

1910 Ethel Reigeluth (Mrs. Myron G. Darby) 1940 

1911 Edith Johnson (Mrs. Douglas Donald) 1943 
1913 Margaret Wilkins 1944 

1916 Laura Cheever (Mrs. James E. Downs) 1945 

1917 Dorothy Small (Mrs. Oliver D. Westcott) 1946 



Velma Rowell (Mrs. George J. Cutler) 

Grace Leyser (Mrs. Grace L. Boynton) 

Muriel Moxley (Mrs. Beverly R. Hubbard) 

Marion Kimball (Mrs. David H. Bigelow) 

Ruth Hill (Mrs. A. Evans Kephart) 

Elizabeth Flagg (Mrs. Sterling Dow) 

Polly Bullard (Mrs. A. John Holden, Jr.) 

Charlotte Hanna (Mrs. George B. Beveridge) 

Emily Sloper 

Mary Jane Owlsey (Mrs. Jack R. Warwick) 

Barbara Graham (Mrs. Francis Holland) 

Dorothy Richardson 

Margaret Chase (Mrs. Robert E. Johnson) 

Martha E. Ransom (Mrs. Arthur W. Tucker) 

Mary Howard 

Marion Burdine 

Nancy Mclvor 

Shirley Sommer 

Mary Burton 




HONOR A'S 
Left to right: Mary Burton, Virginia Finney, Miss Hearsey, Barbara Graf, Dorothy King 

ALUMNAE DAUGHTERS AND RELATIVES 

{Photo on front cover) 

First Row: Martha Ball, Janet Mclvor, Felicia Tavares, Nancy Hamilton. 

Second Row: Mary Alice Dodge, Mary Farrar, Helen Sinclaire, Paula Flowers. 

Third Row: Joyce Griffin, Joanne Campbell, Nancy Nalle, Carolyn England, Jane Brown, 

Frances Brumback, Lee Booth 
Fourth Row: Carolyn Jenkins, Sally Humason, Nancy Brumback, Elizabeth Ann Mitchell 
Fifth Row: Rosemary Jones, Harriet Lattin, Nancy Barnard, Mackay Selden, Mary Rich 
Top Row: Nancy Newhall, Mary Carroll Sinclaire, Mary Lo White, Helen Taylor 



NEW ALUMNAE RELATIVES, SEPTEMBER 1946 

Martha Ball, sister of Barbara Ball 1945; Fredericka Brown, sister of Elizabeth Brown 1945; 
Mary Alice Dodge, granddaughter of Alice Stebbins Dodge, 1883; Mary Farrar, grand- 
daughter of Mary Carter Righter 1889, daughter of Elizabeth Righter Farrar 1925, niece of 
Katharine Righter Morris 1918; Carolyn Jenkins, daughter of Louise Kimball Jenkins 1916; 
Rosemary Jones, daughter of Jessie Wightman Jones 191 1, sister of Virginia Jones Garvan 
1938, and Doris Jones Hannegan 1941; Harriet Lattin, granddaughter of Harriet Chapell 
Newcomb 1876, daughter of Cornelia Newcomb Lattin 191 7, and niece of Ruth Newcomb 
1 9 10; Elizabeth Merrick, sister of Joyce Merrick 1946; Nancy Nalle, daughter of Harriet 
Balfe Nalle 191 7; Helen Sinclaire, daughter of Mary Swartwood Sinclaire 1923, sister of 
Mary Carroll Sinclaire, now attending Abbot; Gloria Yoffa, sister of Joyce Yoffa Rudolph 
1 943 ; Elizabeth Moss, sister of Marguerite Moss, aff. 1 948. 

8 




Sally V. Allen 
daughter of Mary Button 
Allen 1 91 9 



Georgia Lee Mills 

laughter of Lee Wickersham 
Mills 1920 



Alumnae 

Daughter 

Graduates 

1946 







Mary Louise Howe 

daughter of Esther Van 
Dervoort Howe 1916 



Barbara Biddle 

granddaughter of Winifred 
Brownell Freeman 1896 



Carolyn M. Teeson 

daughter of Marion Martin 
Teeson 191 3 





CLASS OF 1886 

Left to right: Jennie Lan- 
phear Buck, Frances Swazey 
Parker, Mary Gorton Dar- 
ling, Alice Jenkins, Harriet 
Raymond Brosnan. 



CLASS OF 1896 

Left to right: Sara Jackson 
Smith, Lillian Franklin Carr, 
Ruth Loring Conant, Grace 
Pearson Preston, Harriet 
Dockrill Bennett, Helen 
Marland Bradbury. 



CLASS OF 1906 

First Row: Ri Pillsbury 
Hawks '07, Persis Mackin- 
tire Carr, Maud Sprague, 
Alice Barbour Merrill, Ruth 
Adams Downer, Constance 
Parker Chipman. 

Second Row: Rena Porter 
Hastings, Evelyn Korn, 
Helen Ellis Rice. 

Top Row: Helen Jones 
Bliss, Louise Richards Rol- 
lins '07, Clara Hukill Leeds 
'07. 



CLASS OF 1911 

Left to right: Jessie Wight- 
man Jones, Ruth Niks 
Thompson, Margaret Cope- 
land, Dorothy Bigelow 
Arms, Marion Brown, Re- 
becca Newton W e e d o n , 
Edith Johnson Donald, Eth- 
el Swain Smith, Henrietta 
Wiest Zaner. 



CLASS OF 1916 

First Row: Grace Merrill 
Emery, Louise King Childs, 
Dorothy Higgins Rand, 
Louise Kimball Jenkins, El- 
eanor Frary Rogers, Esther 
Van Dervoort Howe. 

Second Row: Charlotte 
Eaton, Esther Kilton, Eu- 
genia Parker, Katharine 
Odell Randall. 

Top Row: Emma Stohn 
Larrabee, Vera Allen, Mil- 
dred Jenkins Dalrymple, 
Dorothy Pillsbury Bartlett. 



CLASS OF 1921 

First Row: Henrietta 
Thompson Beal, Elizabeth 
Thompson Winslow, Mild- 
red Peabody, Helen Bruno 
Clegg, Marion Cleveland 
Botsford, Dorothy Martin 
Buracker, Helen Norpell 
Price. 

Second Row: Marion Kim- 
ball Bigelow, Eunice Meigs 
Pease, Eleanor Voorhees, 
Elizabeth Bulkeley. 

Third Row: Edith Page 
Bennett. Julia Guild Dan- 
ielson, Margaret Ailing 
Ward, Agnes Titcomb Hen- 
derson, Louise Van Dervoort 
Sweet. 

Top Row: Frances Gasser 
Stover, Elizabeth McClellan 
Stefani, Alice Hallett Brad- 
ley, Dorothy Carr, Lydia 
Kunkel Eldredge. 








CLASS OF 1926 

First Row: Louise Douglas 
Hill, Jane Hovey, Elinor 
Mahoney Smith, Ruth Dead- 
man McLennan. 

Second Row: Frances 
Flagg Sanborn, Priscilla 
Perkins Leach, Ruth Katz- 
mann Pope, Anstiss Bowser 
Wagner, Alice Perry, Caro- 
lyn Bridgham Ricard. 

Top Row: Barbara Bloom- 
field Wood, Katharine Clay 
Sawyer, Frances McDougall 
McLoon, Florence Allen 
Needham. 



CLASS OF 1931 

First Row: Monica Keith, 
Doris Allen Carroll, Peggy 
O'Leary White, Faith Chip- 
man Parker, Marcia Rudd 
Keil, Mary Bacon. 

Top Row: Katherine Al- 
len Babson, Jane Sullivan, 
Emily Bullock, Ruth Cann 
Baker. 




CLASS OF 1936 

First Row: Clara Holland 
Chase, Marion Mo oney 
Starr, Mary Dooley. 

Second Row: Polly Spear 
Chapin, Sylvia Wright 
Poole. 

Top Row: Lucy Hawkes 
Lamson, Mary Trafton 
Simonds, Mary Swan, Sally 
Scates Phelan. 





CLASS OF 1941 

First Row: Sue Long 
Kremer, Nancy Kelley Park, 
Joan Waugh, Addie Water- 
house McKay, Bonnie Wil- 
son Hakanson. 

Second Row: Emily Ruth 
Poynter, Alda Grieco Cesar- 
ini, Frances Troub, Julie 
Nelson Williams. 



Alumnae Association 



ALUMNAE DAY, JUNE 8, 1946 




Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 

Dear Alumnae : The Fall seems to find the 
world still in a state of confusion, but I hope 
that with you individually, life has become 
normal. I hope that many of you will be 
able to attend the Alumnae meetings and 
the local Abbot club meetings this coming 
year, and that I shall have the pleasure of 
seeing you at these events. 

My best wishes for a happy winter. 

Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 
President, Abbot Alumnae Association 

Annual Meeting 

Alumnae Day brought an enthusi- 
astic return of over two hundred 
D.O.G's, many celebrating their 
class reunions, and seeing with eager 
interest the new buildings and im- 
provements. The program com- 
menced with the Annual Meeting of 
the Alumnae Association at 1 1 .30 
a.m. in Abbot Hall, the president, 



Mrs. Roberta Kendall Kennedy 
presiding. The usual annual reports 
were read and approved. The Alum- 
nae Trustees Helen Allen Henry 
and Margaret Van Voorhis spoke 
appreciatively of their responsibili- 
ties as representatives of the alumnae 
on the Board of Trustees. The Boston 
and New York Abbot Clubs were 
represented by their presidents, 
Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson and 
Gertrude Holbrook respectively. The 
entrance of the senior class was 
watched with interest as there were 
several alumnae daughters in the 
group. Miss Hearsey presented the 
class to Mrs. Kennedy, who ac- 
cepted them in the name of the 
Association as most promising new 
members. 

The Association then voted a gift 
of $200. to the 75th Anniversary 
Scholarship Fund, which is the ob- 
jective of the Second Century Alum- 
nae Fund this year. Miss McPherson 
had announced the total amount 
received since April 1, to be $2738. 

Mrs. Helen Abbott Allen, chair- 
man of the Nominating committee, 
presented the report of the commit- 
tee with the slate of new officers. 
The secretary was empowered to 
cast one ballot and the following 
were declared elected to serve terms 
of two years. Pres. Mrs. Virginia 
Gay d'Elseaux 1928; Vice-pres. Mrs. 
Edith Johnson Donald, 191 1, Mrs. 
Polly Francis Loesch 1929, Mrs. 
Martha Elizabeth Ransom Tucker 
1937. Clerk, Mrs. Frances Flagg 
Sanborn 1926; Treas. Mrs. Rosa- 



14 




*T' 




•v. 



J- 











>••.•. HSe.'" -.- - : V ' *<"> 



.*.':'. •*&•'■ 



"MADAME ABBOT RETURNS" 

Z*/* to ng/z*: Mary Rockwell, GzV/ c/"'j?/; Esther Van Dervoort Howe, Girl of '16; Helen Abbott 
Allen, GzV/ of '01; Helen Marland Bradley, Girl of '96; Grace Holden, Girl of 'gr; Mary 
Dooley, Girl of '46; Carol Paradise, Madame Abbot; Phyllis Campbell Bradley, Girl of 
'36; Molly Jordan Goodrich, Girl of '06; Nancy Harrison, Girl of '41; Katherine Kennedy 
Beardsley, Girl of '86; Frances Butler, Girl of '26; Lee Wickersham Mills, Girl of '21; 
Edith Johnson Donald, Girl of 'u; 

(Voice of the Abbot Spirit, Helen Danforth Prudden) 



mond Castle Olivetti 1930. Mrs. 
Kennedy introduced the new presi- 
dent who then took the chair and 
declared the meeting adjourned. 

Alumnae Luncheon 

At one o'clock all alumnae met in 
the John-Esther Art Gallery for the 
75th Anniversary luncheon. The 
tables were beautifully decorated 
with garden flowers by Ruth Clark 
Weaver and her committee. The 
seating arrangements by classes were 
arranged by Marion Mellor Dean, 
Cornelia Sargent Battershill and 
Helen Hamblet Dyer. At the head 
table were seated Miss Hearsey, 
Mrs. Kennedy, Mrs. d'Ekeaux; past 
presidents of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion and the Alumnae Trustees. A 
large appropriately decorated 75th 
anniversary cake occupied a con- 
spicuous place in the decorations. 



In spite of a delicious luncheon the 
heat grew so oppressive that it was 
necessary to move to Abbot Hall for 
the Anniversary program. Miss Hear- 
sey was enthusiastically greeted fol- 
lowing her introduction by Mrs. 
Kennedy, and then gave an inter- 
esting talk on Abbot's past, present 
and prospects for future develop- 
ment, announcing at the close the 
plan for her coming year's leave of 
absence. Then followed the reports 
of the reuning classes, many an- 
nouncing reunion gifts to the school. 

The climax of the program was 
the presentation of "Madame Abbot 
Returns," a skit written by Helen 
Danforth Prudden 1913. Characters 
representing the reunion classes, 
dressed in costumes of each period 
(see photo), report to Madame 
Abbot the contributions made by 
alumnafc to the school she founded. 
At the conclusion she says, 



15 



'I've heard enough to know my 

friends, 
My gift has paid rich dividends 
In wit, achievement, human 

good — 
I'm proud of Abbot womanhood! 
To you old girls, to new girls 

everywhere, 
I leave the school's future in your 



care 



55 



The program closed with the singing 
of "Alma Mater." 

Around seventy-five alumnae met 



for dinner in the Bailey Dining room, 
as guests of the school. They fully 
appreciated this opportunity of en- 
joying the beautiful room with its 
views of the Quadrangle Garden 
and down the Maple Walk. 

And so ended another successful 
Alumnae Day. In spite of oppressive 
heat, and a terrific thunderstorm in 
the evening, everyone had a grand 
time, and expressed genuine pride 
and satisfaction in her beloved 
school. 



Receipts 
June i, 1946 



Treasurer's Report, 1945-46 

(condensed for Bulletin) 

Balance in Andover National Bank $903 . 76 

Interest from Invested Funds 251 .56 



30.00 

12.22 
34-53 

24.24 



; n55-32 



Total 
Expenditures 

Alumni Council dues (1945- 1946) 

Alumnae Office Secretaries' trip to Alumni Council 

Meeting in Exeter, N. H. 
Mrs. Chipman's trip to New York Abbot Club 
President of Alumnae Association's trip to Boston 

for Board Meeting 
Andover Press Ltd. 1000 cards for joint meeting 

of Alumnae Asso. and Boston Abbot Club 
Rental of College Club for joint meeting 
Speaker's fee for joint meeting 
J. H. Playdon (Commencement flowers) 
Senior Coffee Party 

Total 
June 3, 1946 Cash on hand in Andover National Bank 



$ii55-32 
Respectfully submitted 

Laura Cheever Downs (Treas.) 

I have examii^pd the within accounts and find the balance of 

$000.25 correct. T _ _, , . .. N 

J ^ Jean David Blunt (Auditor) 



13-50 




15.00 




25.00 




6.00 




4-58 






165.07 




* 


990-25 



June 6, 1946 



16 



Abbot Clubs 

"Thanks to the Abbot Club luncheon this spring I met /" That is 

the happy report from several who have attended club meetings. Won't 
you plan to attend the next scheduled event in your vicinity? 



BOSTON (1892): President, Mrs. Ernest 
F. Tillson (Gwendolyn Bloomfield) '22; 
Vice-presidents, Mrs. Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 
'28; Mrs. Elizabeth Sage Batchelder '33; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. Louise Risley Stever 
37; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Nancy 
Kelley Park '41; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret 
Nay Gramkow '27; Auditor, Mrs. Mary Piper 
Sears '28; Program Chairman, Mrs. Faith 
Chipman Parker '31; Directors 1946- 1948, 
Barbara Goss '22, Mary Howard '40, Mrs. 
Jacqueline Proctor de Brun '40. Directors 
1 945- 1 947, Mrs. Lydia Kunkel Eldredge '21, 
Miss Irene Atwood '18, Mrs. Ruth Baker 
Johnson '30. 

The fall meeting of the Boston Abbot 
Club will be on Saturday, November 2, at 
the College Club. A buffet luncheon will be 
served at one o'clock. 

Madeleine Proctor 1938, recently a Capt. 
in the WAC will speak on her varied ex- 
periences in this country and abroad. 

CHICAGO (1921): President, Mrs. J. 
Allen Lind (Mary Simpson); Secretary, Mrs. 
Edith Bullen Creeden, 461 Hill Rd., Win- 
netka; Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Hall Walker. 

CONNECTICUT (1923): President, Miss 
Sara Peck, 20 Fairview Ter., Derby; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Lawton Cheney, 
36 Morse St., Hamden. 

DETROIT (1922): President, Mrs. Thom- 
as Nalle (Harriet Balfe) ,1211 Willow Lane, 
Birmingham. 

MAINE, EASTERN (1926): President, 
Mrs. John H. McLoon (Frances McDougall), 
in Beech St., Rockland, Maine; Secretary 
and Treasurer, Mrs. Herbert L. Bryant (An- 
netta Richards), 64 State St., Brewer, 
Maine. 

A meeting of the club was held at Cam- 
den on Sept. 5, with an attendance of eight. 

MAINE, WESTERN (1922): President, 
Mrs. Harold Robinson (Harriette Woolver- 
ton), Cape Elizabeth; Treasurer, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Baldwin Frohock. 



NEW YORK (1898): President, Miss 
Gertrude Holbrook '25; Vice-presidents , 
Mrs. Laura Scudder Williamson '24, Mrs. 
Helga Lundin Buttrick '23; Recording Secre- 
tary, Mrs. Grace Leyser Boynton '19; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, Mrs. Jane Owsley War- 
wick '30; Treasurer, Mrs. Ruth Cann Baker 
'3 1 ; Directors, Mrs. Helen Bradley Hodgkin- 
son '19, Mrs. Eunice Meigs Pease '21, Mrs. 
Ethel Thompson James '24; Auditor, Mrs. 
Despina Plakias Messinesi '29. 

The fall meeting of the club will be held 
on Saturday, December 7; place to be 
announced. Save the date. Date a classmate! 

Miss Friskin gave a delightful recital at 
the spring meeting. Class hostesses made each 
alumna feel especially welcome at her special 
class table, and an unusually friendly atmos- 
phere prevailed. 

OHIO, CENTRAL (1921): President, 
Mrs. Paul Meek (Louise Norpell), 5600 
Meek Rd., Worthington. Secretary: Mrs. 
Coburn R. Wheeler (Bettina Rollins), 2644 
Berwyn Rd., Columbus 8, Ohio. 

A meeting of the club was held on May 20, 
a* the Maramor Restaurant in Columbus. 
Those present were Louise Norpell Meek, 
Peg Graham Greenleaf, and Bettina Rollins 
Wheeler of Columbus. From Newark came 
Alice Hinckley Black, Alice Fleet Miller, 
Alice Miller Spaulding, Kate Winegarner 
Spencer and Laura Beggs. 

OHIO, CLEVELAND (1927): President, 
Mrs. George Worthington (Madeleine Fiske), 
Chesterland, Ohio. 

OLD COLONY (1924): President, Mrs. 
A. Scudder Moore (Ruth Murray), 96 So. 
Elm St., West Bridgewater; Sec.-Treas., Mrs. 
Oscar Finger (Martha Wind), 90 Belcher 
Ave., Brockton. 

The annual fall luncheon meeting will 
be held on Saturday, October 26, at "The 
Merrymans," near Brockton. 

PITTSBURGH (1921): President, Mrs. 
George H. Jackson (Gertrude Miller), But- 
ler, Pa.; Secretary, Mrs. Joseph M. Browne 
(Eliza Atwell), 529 Pine Rd., Sewickley. 



17 



In Memoriam 



1873 

Sarah E. Sands (Mrs. Daniel W. Little- 
field) died on December 28, 1943. 

1874 

Harriet Parks Baldwin died on August 22, 
in her 91st year. 

1879 
Mary Noyes died on November 19, 1945. 

1880 

Emma Chadbourne, widow of Rev. Sum- 
ner G. Wood, died October 8. 

1889 

Mary Burr Hutchings died September 6. 
For many years Miss Hutchings taught 
English and literature in the Bangor, Maine, 
high school. "She had the art of moulding 
her pupils, who admired and loved her." 

1891 

Annie Brown, widow of Leonard H. 
Campbell, died on April 25. 

Louise Goldsmith, wife of Arthur G. 
Clark, died on April 22. 

1892 

Edith Croll (Mrs. Frank Brown), died on 
October 31, 1940. 

1896 

Sara Knowles Jackson, widow of Albert 
G. Smith, died on September 9. She was the 
granddaughter of The Rev. Samuel C. 
Jackson, who was a member of the original 
Board of Trustees of Abbot, and who con- 
tinued in that office for fifty years. She taught 
arts and crafts for many years, as well as 



practicing occupational therapy. She at- 
tended her 50th reunion at Abbot last June. 
Her daughter, Susanna Smith Bowles '24, 
represented the 4th generation in a direct 
line to attend Abbot. 

Mrs. Smith bequeathed a fine portrait of 
The Rev. Samuel Jackson to Abbot. 

1902 

Mercer Mason, wife of the late Major 
James B. Kemper, died on August 13. She 
was the sister of Anne Mason Gregory 1903, 
and Ruth Mason Dunlop 1905. 

1908 

Marian Allchin, wife of Paul Rowland, 
died on May 30. 

1933 

Betty Ballantyne, wife of David W. Murch- 
ison, died on June 15. 

Past Faculty 

Dr. Faith L. Merserve died on July 19. 
She was Examining Physician from 1931- 
1942. 

Prof. Joseph N. Ashton died August 2. 
From 1907 to 191 2 Prof. Ashton was director 
of Music at Abbot. He was the author of 
"Music in Worship," and of other books, 
and had been organist in several churches. 

The Staff 

Oscar Hammer died on August 21. 
Since 1928 he had been the painstaking 
craftsman who accomplished with meticu- 
lous care, the many large and small car- 
pentering jobs in the school. 



Alumnae Visitors at Abbot During the Summer 

Nancy Emerson '44, Barbara W. Johnson '42, Florence Fitzhugh Phelps 
'28, Elizabeth Barnes Callender '34, Elizabeth Burtnett Horle '25, Esther 
Wood Peirce '23, Marilyn Tapper Mountain '43, Anna Nettleton Miles '93, 
Cecile Van Peursem Lane '35, Barbara A. Hill '42, Helen Weber Mitchell 
'09, Doris McGlintock Taylor '19, Nancy Baylor '44, Nellie L. Campbell 
'96, Lisette Micoleau Tillinghast '31, Barbara B. Ball '45, Harriet Balfe 
Nalle '17, Molly Hubbard '44, Betty Colson '44. 



18 



Class News 



1874-1890 

Class Funds Secretary: Mrs. Ernest C. 
Young (Ruth Childs), 6 Emerson St., Brook- 
line. 

1876 

Harriet Chapell Newcomb's granddaughter 
Harriet Lattin, has entered Abbot. Her 
mother is Cornelia Newcomb Lattin, 191 7. 

1883 

Alice Stebbins Dodge's granddaughter 
Mary Alice Dodge, is a new student this fall. 

1886 

The class of 1886 has now nine members, 
just half its eighteen original members, and 
six of these nine, came to the reunion to 
celebrate its sixtieth anniversary. 

We have come through these years re- 
markably well, and went to all the regular 
events of commencement time including the 
75th anniversary luncheon of the Alumnae 
Association. We had supper in the school 
dining room Saturday night, breakfast with 
Miss Hearsey at Sunset Lodge, and our own 
class dinner Sunday noon. 

The best part of it all was our being to- 
gether as classmates on the sixtieth anniver- 
sary, and we hope, that at the end of this 
next five years, there will be some members 
who can come to a reunion, and who will 
represent and report about this class of 1886. 
Harriet Raymond Brosnan 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frank W. Dar- 
ling (Mary Gorton), Hampton, Virginia. 

1889 

Mary Carter Righter's granddaughter 
Mary Farrar, has entered Abbot. She is the 
daughter of Elizabeth Righter Farrar 1925. 

On September 6, Mary B. Hutchings, a 
beloved member of the Class of '89, passed 
away in Brewer, Maine. 

As a class, we mourn her passing. She was 
a most faithful friend and loyal member of 
the Alumnae Association, who cannot be 
replaced. 

Annis Spencer Gilbert 

1891 

'91 was represented by one member (the 
reunion chairman), at its fifty- fifth reunion. 



I know the members of '91 will enjoy reading 

of Commencement in the October Bulletin. 

Annie Bull Hardenbergh 

1892 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane B. Car- 
penter, 32 Shepard St., Apt. 22, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

1893 

Myrtie Woodman Lane is living with her 
daughter in Fond du Lac, Wise. She keeps 
up her study in piano besides some concert 
playing. She hopes to start teaching her 
grandson 2^ years old! 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Harry R. 
Miles (Anna Nettleton), 4 Rock Ledge 
Drive, Stamford, Conn. 

1894 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Doremus 
Scudder (Mabel Bosher), 133 West Ninth 
St., Claremont, Cal. 

1895 

Marian Hall Bailey and her husband Albert 
E. Bailey, celebrated their golden wedding 
anniversary on June 23, with a gathering of 
children and grandchildren. 

1896 

The Fifty year class met for its reunion in 
And over with seven present; Helen Mar land 
Bradbury, Harriet Dockrill Bennett, Lillian 
Franklin Carr, Ruth Loring Conant, Florence 
Holt, Grace Pearson Preston, and Sara Jack- 
son Smith. 

We were 19 strong in 1896 with two col- 
lege preparatory students who were not 
then considered worthy of receiving diplo- 
mas. Five of our number have died and of 
the sixteen living, two are invalids, two at 
too great a distance to attend reunion. Of a 
possible twelve there were here seven. To 
look forward to fifty years of living under 
any circumstances would seem like climbing 
a mountain with the road rising steeply up- 
hill all the way. But to look back as we have 
done the resting places on the terraces are so 
much more in our memories. There have 
been gains and losses; why, after careful 
inquiry I do not find that any one of us owns 
a pretty little white flannel petticoat now! 
As for gains, who among us has not added 
pounds. We have had twenty children and 



19 



the list of grandchildren is not yet complete. 
We have lived through two wars with all the 
griefs and sorrows. How we have done our 
best to save, knit and garden. We have sent 
a few of our sons to this last war. 

What Abbot contributed to our strength 
of body, mind and spirit we all know, for 
each of us learned lessons here that have 
kept us upright and outgiving. Miss Kelsey 
was amused when I told her that what I 
learned in her geometry class helped me to 
cut out my little children's clothes. 

I could tell you of many fine accomplish- 
ments of different members of '96, of social 
service workers; of teachers who were the 
inspiration of their pupils; of those with no 
children of their own who were wonderful 
mothers to the children of others. Of hobbies 
and travels, one of us even went to Scotland 
to play her favorite game of golf; of one who 
has been seeking a red iris; one collects 
modern poetry. One beloved member has 
made our class her hobby and kept us all 
informed of each other with her letters of 
golden gossip, our secretary through the 
whole fifty years! 

So here in brief is the tale of some loyal 
Abbot daughters. 

Lillian Franklin Carr 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Henry V. 
Conant (Ruth Loring), 914 High St., Ded- 
ham. 

1897 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Alexander 
Bunce (Gertrude Ware), R.F.D. 1, Rock- 
ville, Conn. 

1898 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert W. 
Dunbar (Selina Cook), 3 Elk St., Apt. 7, 
Albany, N. Y. 

1900 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur P. 
Spear (Grace Chapman), 156 Winchester 
St., Brookline. 



Have we your correct address? Please 
send with news notes to the Alumnae Office. 



1901 

Twelve of our original group of twenty- 
three members were present for our 45th 
anniversary reunion. In addition Miss Nellie 
Mason and Miss Helen Chickering, whom 
we proudly claim as honorary members, 
met with us for the Alumnae Luncheon, and 



Mercer Mason Kemper and Honora Spalding 
of 1902, close friends of past and present 
years, joined in our reminiscences and de- 
liberations. The thoughtful generous hospi- 
tality of Delight Hall Gage was a very special 
feature throughout. She and Miss Twichell 
made us feel as if their home was ours, too, 
for rest, refreshment, or good company. 

Our class "get together" at Delight's 
with its renewal of friendships, shared inter- 
ests and present-day news was a heart-warm- 
ing experience. Letters brought absent mem- 
bers near. Teaching, administration, medi- 
cine, painting, mountain climbing, home 
making, community interests in great variety 
have kept us busy through the years. 

Faith Leonard Holden and Katharine 
Clark Canfield rejoice in the safe return of 
their sons from over-seas war service, Kath- 
arine's son after a long imprisonment in 
Japan. 

The changes and improvements in the 
school interested us greatly, confirming our 
belief that all is in good hands. The delicious 
dinner in the new dining hall so charmingly 
served by the present students, gave an ap- 
preciated chance to participate in the life 
there today; and later, Miss Chickering' s 
room in the Library seemed to bring to us 
something of her welcome as we settled our- 
selves to further reminisce, to plan for a class 
reunion gift in her memory and to talk about 
coming back the next time. 

Evelyn Carter Giles 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Helen Hale, 
86 Knox St., Lawrence. 

1902 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Hezekiah 
Poore (Mildred Mooers), 37 Ames St., Law- 
rence. 

1904 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. William O. 
Pettit (Elizabeth Winsor), 186 Livingston 
Ave., Brunswick, N.J. 

1906 

The class of 1906 had a very happy 40th 
reunion, ten members being present with 
three from the class of 1907. Nineteen chil- 
dren have produced a goodly number of 
grandchildren to the credit of the class, so 
photographs were much in evidence, and 
past and present were closely entwined in 
reminisences, and the complex problems of 
life today. 



20 



These enduring friendships, begun so 
many years ago, are evidence of the truth 
of Disraeli's words, "Friendship is the gift 
of the gods, and the most precious boon to 
man." 

Persis Mackintire Carr has joined the 
ranks of the grandmothers with the arrival 
of a daughter Christine, to her son Lt. 
Winthrop W. Carr, on July 19. Lt. Carr is on 
duty on the cruiser Juneau, with home base 
at Portland, Maine. 

Persis' husband, Homer D. Carr, died 
suddenly September 29. 

1908 

Winifred Ogden Lindley sends a report of 
her family. "On June 1, Winifred Jr. was 
married to Richard Snyder. John Lindley 
Jr. now out of the army is working in Spring- 
field, Vt. Nelson lives in Natick but plans to 
go to Columbia to take a graduate degree in 
Hospital Administration. 

1909 

Helen Mills Farnsworth's daughter Re- 
becca, was married to Shailer Avery on 
September 14. 

1910 

Ruth Murray Moore's daughter Barbara, 
was married to Richard W. Hersey, on 
June 8. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Myron G. 
Darby (Ethel Reigeluth) 100 Tanglewylde 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

1911 

Dear 191 1 : Well we did talk about all you 
absent people — but what we said were the 
nicest things; how we missed you, and how 
we hoped that next reunion you would be 
with us. 

Those present were: Henrietta Weist Zaner, 
Jessie Wightman Jones, Ethel Swain Smith, 
Rebecca Newton Weeden, Margaret Cope- 
land, Marion Brown, Ruth Miles Thompson, 
Edith Johnson Donald and Dorothy Bigelow 
Arms. We spent the afternoon relaxing and 
reading letters you had sent. It was wonder- 
ful to catch up on news from some who had 
been silent for 35 years. Miss Hearsey gave 
us a real treat, in inviting us to the Saturday 
night dinner in the lovely Bailey Dining 
room, and we had a big round table all to 
ourselves. 

It is a happy memory, and hearing from 
all but one member of our class was a fine 



record; one which we were proud to report 
at the Alumnae meeting. Now we have found 
some of you again please don't let us lose 
touch, but begin to plan for 1951 ! 

Biggie 

Persis Bodwell Millspaugh has done a great 
deal of Red Cross and Motor Corps work. 
Doris Brown Ayers sent a picture of her hand- 
some son, Bill, who was shot down and made 
a prisoner of war in Germany, but who is 
now home. Marion Brown is Lt. Gov. in the 
4th district of Quota. She is also Head of the 
Romance Language Dept. in the Lawrence 
High School. Dora Hays Pym lives on a 99 
acre estate, her son and daughter manage 
the farm end, and she is very husy. Borghild 
//o/Lyman, another from whom we had not 
heard in years, has 4 children, two girls and 
two boys, and three grandchildren, imagine 
that! She sends love to all. 

Miriam Howard Bushnell could not come 
since her son, John was married at reunion 
time. Mary Hull Lewis's husband is with the 
Washington Board of Trade. Frances Husel- 
ton Shaw lived in Florida for five years and 
is now back in Pittsburgh. Katharine Ord- 
way Parker's two sons are owning and editing 
the Chicopee Herald, a weekly paper. At the 
time she wrote she was housing and feeding 
ten people and two dogs! In these days of 
food shortages. 

Edith Seccomb Young's three grandchildren 
spent the summer with her, so she couldn't 
leave to come to reunion. Jessie Wightman 
Jones' daughter Doris Jones Hannegan was 
celebrating her 5th reunion at same time as 
her mother's reunion. Jessie's youngest 
daughter Rosemary, has entered Abbot this 
fall. Corinne Willard Dresser's son W 7 illard, 
has just returned from three years in Europe. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Douglas Don- 
ald (Edith Johnson), 8 Carisbrooke St., 
Andover. 

1913 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Margaret 
Wilkins, 279 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 

1916 

"My part in our 30th reunion started 
early when on Wednesday morning Emmie 
Stohn Larrabee picked me off a train at 
Manchester for a beautiful drive across the 
end of Lake Winnipesaukee to Denmark, 
Maine, where Eugenia had opened 'Blazing 
Trail' (her camp for teen age girls), for our 
pre-reunion reunion. 



21 



"Hardly had we time to stake our claims to 
the two best beds in camp and don dungarees 
before climbing into the truck with 'Uncle 
Harry,' Chum and Skipper, the two dogs 
plus every one else in camp to go to the res- 
cue of Louise King Childs who arrived shame- 
facedly on foot to report her car in a ditch 
down the road apace. Getting Louise out of 
the mud was but the opening chapter of 
three jolly days of camp life not the least 
bit dulled by the rainy weather and a mud 
rutted road to town. Grace Merrill Emery 
and 'Dot Pill' Bartlett and Mildred Jenkins 
Dalrymple, Charlotte Eaton and Ada 
Brewster Brooks arrived singly and in pairs 
to make a total of the nice number often. 

"On Saturday our cavalcade of six cars 
reached Andover in time for part of the 
morning annual meeting, and I think we 
were fairly orthodox for the rest of the day at 
Abbot. Other members of the class joined us 
at Abbot; Vera Allen, Helene Hardy Bobst, 
Esther Van Dervoort Howe, Louise Kimball 
Jenkins, whose daughter Carolyn is one of 
the new girls, Katherine Odell Randell and 
Eleanor Frary Rogers. 

"The class supper at 'Fieldstones' was 
noisy with wagging of tongues and seems to 
have talked me right out of reunion, for 
Saturday evening found me calling on Miss 
Mason who produced a most wonderful 
thunder storm to knock out lights and tele- 
phone and down a live wire in front of my 
sleeping quarters. Very exciting! Sunday 
morning 'Pilly' and I disappeared in the 
direction of the North Shore for visit with 
Marian Bayley Buchanan '13. 

"All of which tells little of Abbot and re- 
union, so my best advice is that you com- 
plain to one or more of the above mentioned 
classmates and ask for more and better de- 
tails. 'Love'n' kisses' just the same." 

Ted 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. James E. 
Downs (Laura Cheever), Bancroft Rd., 
Andover. 

Are you moving? Please send correct ad- 
ress to Alumnae Office. 

1917 

191 7 has two daughters in Abbot this fall. 
Harriet Lattin, daughter of Cornelia New- 
comb Lattin; and Nancy Nalle, daughter of 
Harriet Balfe Nalle. 



Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Oliver D. 
Wescott (Dorothy Small), 84 Main St., 
Nantucket. 

1918 

Phoebe Reese, daughter of Martha Miller 
Reese was chosen president of Baldwin 
School last spring. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George J. 
Cutler (Velma Rowell), 45 Eliot St., Jamaica 
Plain. 

1919 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Grace L. 
Boynton (Grace Leyser), 30 Engle St., 
Tenafly,N.J. 

1920 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Beverly 
Hubbard (Muriel Moxley), 172 Putnam 
Ave., Hamden, Conn. 

1921 

The class of 1921 celebrated its twenty- 
fifth reunion and thoroughly enjoyed every 
moment. There were twenty- three present 
at the alumnae luncheon and it was wonder- 
ful to be together again! The years rolled 
away and before we knew it we picked up 
each friendship just where we had left it, 
a day, a month, or years before. 

We found we needed no wheel chairs, nor 
canes, and had no grandchildren; however 
we did claim thirty-seven children. Louise 
Van De Voort Sweet came all the way from 
Kansas City (her daughter was in the gradu- 
ating class), and Helen Norpell Price from 
Chicago. 

As we sat together in Abbot Chapel during 
the alumnae meeting many a thought went 
back to chapel service twenty-five years ago 
and in memory we saw Miss Bailey, Miss 
Kelsey and many other dear faces. 

We had our picture taken and regardless 
of how we look to others, to one another we 
seem, at least, remarkably "well preserved." 

The class had twenty-one present at the 
reunion banquet at "Fieldstones," to which 
the Thompson twins came wearing the 
garden party hats worn to their graduation 
garden party twenty-five years ago. 

The only business was to elect Frances 

Gasser Stover reunion chairman for 1951 ! 

Everyone was full of praise for Miss Hearsey, 

and proud to proclaim herself an Abbot girl. 

Marion Kimball Bigelow 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. David H. 
Bigelow (Marion Kimball), 326 Highland 
St., West Newton. 



22 



1922 

Alice Tower Kirby writes that her husband 
is manager of the Travel Service in Orange, 
and she is one of the proofreaders for the 
Athol Daily News. Afternoons she takes 
charge of the circulation, and of the news 
boys in Orange. 

1923 

From the Harvard Alumni Bulletin we quote 
the following: "In the combined field of 
History and Greek, Sterling Dow (husband 
of Elizabeth Flagg), now advances to full 
professional status. Already, at the age of 
forty-three, an outstanding scholar in this 
country in Greek history and epigraphy, he 
was recently elected president of the Archae- 
logical Institute of America." 

Dee Osborne Hall's son Jack has made the 
varsity baseball team at Lawrenceville 
School. 

Helen Sinclaire, younger daughter of 
Mary Swartwood Sinclaire, has joined her 
sister Mary Carroll at Abbot. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Sterling Dow 
(Elizabeth Flagg), 36 Holden St., Cam- 
bridge. 

1924 

Margaret MacDonald Vester's daughter 
Johanna is attending Stephens College, and 
Gerhard, ten years, is in school in Clear- 
water. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. John 
Holden (Polly Bullard), 39 No. Pleasant 
St., Middlebury, Vermont. 

1925 

Mary Farrar, daughter of Elizabeth 
Righter Farrar, has entered Abbot. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George B. 
Beveridge (Charlotte Hanna), Sanford- 
town Rd., Redding, Conn. 

The Alumnae Office is glad to answer any 
request for names or addresses. Be sure your 
correct address is listed. 

1926 

Sixteen members of the class attended the 
Alumnae Luncheon and their class business 
meeting held later at the home of Frances 
Flagg Sanborn. Alice Perry was elected the 
new secretary. It was voted to send red roses 
to the class of '86, which class in turn sent 
red roses to' 2 6 for their table at the luncheon. 



Thirty-one in the class arc married, and 
there were reported thirty-five children. 

Ruth Katzmann Pope gave a very interest- 
ing talk about her terrible trip home from 
Germany a year ago in January. Anstiss 
Bowser Wagner is working in a research 
laboratory in a hospital in Boston. Elinor 
Mahoney Smith's husband is an architect, 
they have one son aged seven, she is on the 
board of the Salem Home for Aged Women, 
the Salem Animal Rescue League and on 
the Wenham Village Improvement League. 

Florence MacDougall Ranney had planned 
to go to the reunion, but her husband was 
ill. She is a past president of the White Street 
School P.T.A., and is now on the Executive 
Board of the Council of P.T.A.'s in Spring- 
field. She has two girls. Olive Rogers Smith 
had planned to attend but was called to 
Chicago because of the death of her sister 
Gladys. She has one little girl. 

Jane Ruth Hovey had just returned from a 
three months trip to Cal. She is active in 
Republican politics. Flossie Allen Needham 
is president of the Manchester, N.H. Wom- 
en's Club. Faunty Flagg Sanborn has just 
finished her term as president of the Benevo- 
lence Society of the Phillips Andover Facul- 
ty. Flora Skinner and Alice Perry have been 
very active in the Mass. Women's Corps. 

Letters from the following were read, all 
expressing their disappointment in not being 
able to attend. Gretchen Vanderschmit 
wrote her class-summer school was so crow- 
ded she couldn't leave. Emily Gage is parish 
secretary at St. Paul's Church, Norwalk, 
Conn. She is doing some writing and had a 
vignette in the American Magazine in Decem- 
ber. Sue Loizeaux was very busy dismant- 
ling her large home which she was trying to 
sell. 

Dorothy Pease worked for the U.S.O. 
Travellers Aid for 4^ years, had resigned in 
January and now has a temporary child wel- 
fare job. 

Gracie Griffin Westmore is living in Presque 
Isle, Maine, where her husband is managing 
the Northeastland Hotel. She has three 
girls, Lucy Jane 12, Cynthia Ann 10, and 
Nancy 7. Her niece Joyce Griffin has entered 
Abbot. Adelaide Black is now Dean of 
Women at the Katharine Gibbs School in 
New York. Dorothy Gillette Henley couldn't 
attend because she was going to Georgia 
where her husband was to receive a D.D. 



23 



degree. She has two girls, one 15^ who 
attended the Northfield School for Girls, 
and one 12. Carlotta Sloper was assistant 
hostess at the Y.W.G.A. Snack Bar in New 
Britain. 

Helen Larson has four dogs of her own 
and runs a beauty shop for Kerry Blues. She 
owns the champion Kerry Blue in her section 
of the country. Edith Bullen Creden said she 
had been doing war work connected with 
the A.W.V.S. branch in Chicago. She has 
a 93^ year old boy Jack, two Scotties and 
eight goldfish! Jean Donald is a medical 
Social consultant for the State Health Dept. 
of N.C. She recently resigned from the Red 
Cross where she was assigned as Field Di- 
rector at Camp Upton Convalescent Hos- 
pital. 

Gertrude Craik Barna went to Monte 
Carlo last January with her mother and 
husband. Her address is Villa Carmellia, 
Ave., St. Roman, Monte Carlo, Monaco, 
France. She is raising oranges, olives etc., 
and extends a cordial invitation to all 26ers 
to visit her there. 

M. Alice Perry 
1927 

Kay Farlow Hutchinson and her family are 
back "in the gold mining game in the high 
Sierras, in quite the most magnificent 
country we have yet found. My husband is 
Supt. of the Brush Creek Mine at Goodyears 
Bar, Cal." 

. Helen Dyer Peirce writes that her husband 
is still in the service. They have bought a 
house in Auburndale, on the Charles River. 

1928 

Josephine Paret Barrett's husband has 
rejoined the Air Corps, as a regular Army 
officer. She is living for the present in Ham- 
den, Conn. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Arm- 
strong (Elizabeth Schuh) a third child and 
second daughter Ellen, January 25. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Emily Sloper, 
56 Russell St., New Britain, Conn. 

1930 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Frank Johnson 
(Ruth Baker) a second son, Alan Baker, 
April 1 1 . Frank Jr. is eleven, and Nancy Lee 
is eight years old. 

Married: Donna Brace Latham to Louis 
Francis Kroeck, June 29. She is living in 
Chicago. 



Born: To Mr. and Mrs. George Guild 
(Betty Brown), a second child, a daughter 
Barbara, July 31. Betty says, "Please put 
Barbara on the entrance list for the appro- 
priate year!" 

Barbara Lord Mathias is in New Haven 
where her husband is Director of Yale 
Studies for Returning Veterans. 

Marianna Smith Hile wrote of the death of 
her youngest daughter Sarah in April, after 
a prolonged illness. She is living in Ann 
Arbor where her husband is in business. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Jack R. War- 
wick (Mary Jane Owsley), 26 Ledgewood 
Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 

1931 

The ten of us who returned to Abbot for 
our fifteenth, are already making plans for 
our twentieth reunion. In spite of the heat 
we all had a wonderful time. Mary Bacon, 
Ruth Cann Baker and her daughter Marjorie. 
Kit Allen Babson and I stayed with Emily 
Bullock, where we stayed up until the wee 
small hours talking over news of our class- 
mates. After the Alumnae luncheon, and 
picture taking, the class went to Emily's for 
tea, and an informal business meeting. Mary 
Bacon was made co-treasurer with Gertrud 
Van Peursem Bell. We voted a gift from the 
class treasury to start a scholarship fund for 
the benefit of an Abbot daughter. Faith 
Chipman Parker was elected re-union chair- 
man for our twentieth. Will see you then! 

Doris Allen Carroll 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. James D. Holmes 
(Nancy Carr), a daughter Alice Davidson, 
June 7. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Philip G. Bell 
(Gertrud Van Peursem), a daughter, 
Margaret Graham June 12. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Francis Hol- 
land (Barbara Graham), 644 Orchard St. 
East Lansing, Michigan. 

1932 

Isabel Arms is studying at the New Eng- 
land Conservatory of Music in Boston. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Dorothy 
Richardson, Boston Rd., Billerica. 

1933 

Margaret Chase Johnson sends news of her 
family now living at St. George, Staten 
Island, N. Y. "In December '45 my husband 
returned from overseas duty with the Marine 



24 



Corps, and returned to his civilian job. J 
Continued as educational consultant with 
i lie New York Association ol I Jay Xurseric- . 

Spring found us well launf bed on a strenuous 
ichedulc of political activics and on August 

20th he won the Republican nomination 
lor the State Senate 'when In < rved horr; 

IO40-I942) " 

Frames Mcdarry Ogg has three children 
Robin 9, Duncan 6, and Caroline 1 j/£ years 
old. Her husband is Sales Engineer at the 
.Norton (Jo. in Worcester. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert D. 
Johnson ^Margaret Chase;, 100 Stuyvesant 
Place, St. George, Staten Island, X. Y. 

1936 

On June H, nine of our class of twenty- 
eight returned for our tenth reunion. None 
of us could actually realize that it had been 
ten short years since we joined the ranks of 
Abbot alumnae. The seven were: Mary 
Dooley, Lucy Hawkes Larnson, Sally Scales 
Phelan, Polly Spear Chapin, Mary Swan, 
Mary Trqfton Simonds and Sylvia Wright 
Poole. 

After all the planned alumnae activities 
we gathered at Fieldstones where we gleaned 
all possible news of our class. Charlotte Dane 
was married this spring in Rhode Island, 
Ann Dodge is living in New York and loving 
her newspaper work. Eleanor Wells is also 
in New York working. Barbara Reinhart Liv- 
ingston has found a house at 41 Kent Place, 
Summit, X. J., and was just getting settled. 
Anne Russell Loring is still living in Moores- 
town, X.J. but now has her husband home, 
and a new address at 2 W. Maple Ave. Mary 
Trajton Simonds is with her husband at 40 
Andover St., Cambridge, where John is 
finishing graduate work, and Sylvia Wright 
Poole is also settled after the war at 121 
Farrington Ave., Phillipse Manor, Xo. 
Tarrytown, X. Y. We all had a wonderful 
reunion but missed you who could not be 
with us. Let's plan now on getting back for 
our 15th! 

Sylvia Wright Poole 

Married: Charlotte Dane to John Egbert 
Breton, April 20. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Wetherbee Lam- 
son (Lucy Hawkesj a daughter Fay, June 7, 

1945- 

Betty Jamieson Crandell reports a son John 

Underhill Jr., four, and a daughter Cathy 
Wheeler, a year old. 



Mary Murray was married on January 2, 
[944 to Loyal Martin Griffin Jr., a ( 

mate in Medical School. I completed 

their coursa together, and live now in San 

Franr 1 < >,. 

Engaged: Harriott Cole to Paul I . I 

1937 

Lucy Hulburd is in London where ihi 
technical assistant to the architect of tl 
London County Council, She graduated 
from the Harvard Architectural School in 
January 1945. 

Married: Elizabeth McArdle to John 
Richard McDerrnott. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Porter C. Srnith- 
Petersen ''Mary Emily Pettingill] a second 
child, a daughter Patricia Cushing, August 
26. 

Married: Louise Ridey Floyd to Dr. Hor- 
ton Guyford Stever, June 29. 

Married: Priscilla Wonson to Clifford 
Hitchcock Hahn, June 1 1 . 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur W. 
Tucker (Martha E. Ransom;, 632 Creat 
Plain Rd., Xeedham. 

1938 

Married: Marie Appleby to Malcolm D. 
Severance, June 1. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Fred Van Buren 
Archer Jr., f Marian Lawson; a fourth son, 
Robert Gould, July 1 1 . 

Married: Virginia Rice to John William 
Dunn, June 15. 

Married: Muriel Wood to John Winet, 
April 27. 

School catalogues mailed on request. 
Have you news for February Bulletin'. 

1939 

MaryAWzDanos has a Graduate Assistant- 
ship in Geology in Penn State College, while 
her husband is completing his degree in 
Physics. 

Born: to Mr. and Mrs. W. Selby Harney 
Jr. f Jeanne Waughj a daughter, Joan Waugh 
June 15. 

1940 

Married: Eleanor Balcke to Harry Charles 
Thompson, May 25. Mr. Thompson is doing 
publicity and public relations work for the 
Xewell-Emmett Co., in Xew York. Eleanor 
is working for the Smith College 75th An- 
niversary Fund in Xew York. 



25 



Married: Carolyn Bittner to William B. 
M. Duane August 29. She will live in Con- 
necticut while her husband resumes his 
studies in Wesleyan University. 

Married: Frances Chandler to Charles 
Warren Partridge Jr. June 8, 1945. She is in 
Munich, Germany, for three years, while her 
husband has a tour of duty. 

Married: Sarah Cole to Herbert Sears 
Tuckerman, June 15. Her attendants were 
her sisters, Ann Cole Gannett '33, Harriott 
'36 and Eleanor '41. 

Married: Phyllis Crocker to Clifford 
Wadsworth England, April 6. 

Married: Carolyn Cross to Roger Wel- 
lington Robbins, May 18. Mr. Robbins is a 
administrative engineer at the Submarine 
Signal Co. in Boston. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Boutin 
(Charlotte Downey) a daughter Sue Louise, 
March 29. Dr. Boutin has been assigned to 
the Walter Reed Hospital in Washington. 

Engaged: Barbara Fowler to Robert 
George Borden Jr. 

Married: Marguerite Hall to Jesse Win- 
fred Crum USN October 5, in Washington, 
D. C. 

Engaged: Mary Howard to Edmund W. 
Nutting. 

Married: Dorothy Garry to Louis May- 
nard War lick, May 18. 

Engaged: Anne Rivinius to Robert Pres- 
cott Wild. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Franklin R. Hoar 
(Doris Sawyer), a second child, and son 
Franklin Rockwood Jr., August 18. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Mary Howard, 
213 Commonwealth Ave., Apt. io, Boston. 

Put the Alumnae Office on your list for 
wedding announcements. 

1941 

Dear Group: 'Tis I again with a wee bit of 
news. The turnout for the Fifth Reunion was 
not as good as we expected. I certainly 
would like to have seen a lot more of my old 
friends. Those who came for the celebration 
were Julie Nelson Williams (she's lost 45 lbs., 
her hair is much darker and she curls it) 
golly, she's an attractive girl, her bouncing 
baby boy appears to be extremely healthy. 
Her hubby will be back from Africa next 
month and then Julie says he'll roam no 
more alone. Addie Waterhouse McKay (pro- 



nounced McKi — it's Scotch) has gained 38 
lbs., she and her hubby are living with the 
Waterhouses at present. Addie, Julie, Gumpy 
my cocker spaniel, and I drove up for the 
reunion in Julie's brand new 1946 Mercury. 
First we were greeted by Nancy Kelly, Joan 
Waugh, Franny Troub (they haven't 
changed a bit), Bonney Wilson (snapshots 
of her baby girl are beautiful, and Phil 
Campbell Bradley — her 2^ year old son 
couldn't have more personality. Phil and 
her hubby are happily settled in their own 
home. Emily Ruth Poynter and Helen 
Stott joined us, it was good to see them plus 
Alda Grieco. Stotti's family has moved into 
a dream house all their own up on "the 
hill." 

Friday night was Rally Night, we had a 
chance to greet our old friends like Miss 
Hearsey, Miss Sweeney, Miss Hancock, Miss 
Tucker, Miss Humes and numerous others. 
We missed Miss Rath and it was a happy 
day to see Miss Carpenter on Sunday. 
Saturday we all gathered for the tremendous 
Alumnae luncheon. Afterwards we went to 
dip up the treasure — rather Theodore did 
the digging — it was in vain. . .we couldn't 
find it. Dorie Jones Hannegan arrived; we 
saw her youngest son on our return trip to 
New York. The treasure was found later, but 
half the class jumped the gun and missed the 
sentimentality of all gathering around for the 
peep. 

If an Abbot girl is truly an Abbot girl I 
sincerely believe she can find a certain peace, 
understanding and warmth that can't be 
bought or obtained at any price anywhere 
except at Abbot. I found it for those few 
days. . .and that's all the gush I'll say for 
now. 

Keep us posted, group, by your postcards, 
letters, newspapers clippings, announce- 
ments, the Bulletin can keep us informed 
about each other. Wishing you all the best 
of what the world has to offer and hoping 
that another five years won't elapse before 
we meet again. 

Sue Long Kremer 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Burr 
(Charlotte Eaton) a son, Robert Eaton, 
May 26. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Addison L. Win- 
ship 2nd (Christine Hill) a daughter Sarah, 
July 24. 

Married: Nancy Kelley to David Chap- 
man Park August 24. 



26 



Margaret Little Dice is living in Austin, 
Texas, where her husband is teaching in the 
University. 

Married: Barbara Robjent to Capt. Her- 
bert Pickford Moore, August 1 7. Among her 
attendants were Mary Carroll O'Connell 
'43, and Margaret McFarlin '42. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frederick S. 
Kremer (Sue Long), 130 East 75th St., 
New York, N. Y. 

1942 

Married: Irene Abbott to Kenneth Paul 
McPherson, September 7. 

Marilyn Barlow was awarded the Helen 
Wieand Cole Graduate Scholarship at her 
graduation from Wheaton College in June. 
She is now with a group of twenty-five stu- 
dents under the guidance of the University 
of Delaware studying French at the Univer- 
sity of Geneva, Switzerland. 

Married: Mary Margaret Boynton to 
Robert Clouston MacPherson, June 19. 

Married: Mary Elizabeth Dunaway to 
Donald Love Burnham, July 5. 

Married: Diantha Hamilton to Com- 
mander Joseph Matthew McDowell, May 3. 

Married: Virginia Fong to Edward Yue 
Chan, May 1 2 . 

Married: Elizabeth Gorsuch to Daniel 
David White. 

Elizabeth Lytle graduated from Cornell 
University in June. She is attending Katha- 
rine Gibbs School in New York. 

Married: Theodora Manning to Herbert 
Maurice Alexander, April 27. 

Married: Edith Ninomiya to Louis Hague, 
January 13. Edith's address is: Counseling 
Unit 2, Separation Center, Camp Beale, 
Cal. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John A. Hemlet 
(Emma Ann Todd), a son, Gregory Todd- 
Eaton, August 23. 

Married: Juliette Weston to Robert Bow- 
en Suhr, June 29. 

Engaged: Ann Zeitung to Nathan Strong 
Hale. 

Sally Zimmermann is Society Editor and 
general handyman on the Daily Journal, in 
the pioneer lumber town of International 
Falls, Minnesota. 

1943 

Married: Amelia Daves to S. L. Kopald 
Jr., August 5. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Davis 



(Alva Houston) a son, Richard Houston, 
July 26. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Lancer R. \\ 'in- 
rich (Louise Swcnning) a son, Lancer Rich" 
ard Jr., October 12, 1 945. 

1944 

Engaged: Ruth Kirstein to Daniel Tur- 
kanis. 

Charlotte Leland is taking the course in 
Occupational Therapy at Milwaukee Down- 
er College. 

Married: Cynthia Teel (aff.) to David 
Jameson Vail, August 12. 

1945 

Married: Gretchen Fuller to Donald 
Frazier, July 28. Her classmates, Sally Leav- 
itt, Marjorie Milne and Helen Norris were 
bridesmaids. 

Engaged: Barbara Haserick to Alan 
Howard Johnson. 

Engaged: Edith Walker (aff.) to Francis 
Bourne Upham III. 

Holly Welles writes of an interesting sum- 
mer. "I was with the American Youth 
Hostel group that went over to do recon- 
struction work on European Hostels. We 
worked in Holland, Luxembourg and South- 
ern France, in the Pyrenees, getting a chance 
to bike through Belgium and also to spend 
two nights in Geneva. We were a group of 
100 to begin with but this divided into di- 
visions of 34 as soon as we reached Europe, 
each division starting in one of the three 
countries I mentioned, working there two 
weeks, and then passing on to another coun- 
try for another two weeks, and so forth. We 
took over our own food and bicycles, the 
idea being to hostel in between work pro- 
jects. It certainly was an interesting and 
worthwhile summer. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Shirley Som- 
mer, 1367 Brown Hills Rd., Rockford, Illin- 
ois. 

1946 

Engaged: Gertrude Stearns (aff. '46) to 
John Heywood. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Mary Burton, 
33 Afterglow Way, Montclair, N. J. 

CLASS OF 1946 

Sally Allen, Briar cliff Junior College 
Barbara Biddle, Connecticut 



27 



Patricia Bowne, Public Relations work, Tele- 
phone Co. 
Ellen Brumback, Wellesley 
Nancy Burns, Radcliffe 
Mary Burton, Scripps 
Noma Clayton, Vassar 
Jenny Copeland, Wells 
Louise Doyle, Regis 
Virginia Finney, Wellesley 
Florence Fry ling, Briar cliff Junior College 
Frances Gorham, Katharine Gibbs, Boston 
Barbara Graf, Russell Sage College 
Muriel Greene, Smith 
Nancy Hellweg, Bennington 
Elsa Hinchman, Bennington 
Patricia Hogan, Bennington 
Mary Howe, Mt. Holyoke 
Katherine Johnson, Wheaton 
Patty Keefer, Wellesley 
Dorothy King, Wheaton 
Greta Leinbach, Bennett Junior College 



Frances Little, University of Michigan 

Joyce Merrick, Wheaton 

Georgia Lee Mills {college not reported) 

Cynthia Noone, Boston University 

Sally North, Wellesley 

Sally Power, Smith 

Phyllis Rairdon, Connecticut 

Luetta Robertson, Wellesley 

Elizabeth Ross, Elmira College 

Marjorie Sommer, Rollins 

Gail Sullivan, Mt. Holyoke 

Carolyn Teeson, Syracuse University 

Polly Thomas, Vassar 

Nancy Thomas, Wellesley 

Marian Troub, Barnard 

Mavis Twomey, Katharine Gibbs, Boston 

Hope Whitcomb, Finch Junior College 

Elizabeth Woodruff, University of Louisville 

Genevieve Wright, Rollins 

Susan Wright, Wellesley 



Record of War Service 

Please fill out and return as soon as possible to the 
Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Andover, Mass. 



Maiden Name Class 



Married Name 



Address 



Postal District No. 



Branch and Name of Service : Army Navy Marines 



Coast Guard Medical Air . 



Red Cross 



Rank: 



Promotions: 



Date of Entering 



Date of Discharge 

Report on Type and Place of Work 
28 



Enclose Photo in Uniform 



u 



RITE news about yourself and others for the February Bulletin. 
Tear out and mail before January 10, to the Alumnae Office, Abbot 
Academy, Andover, Mass. 



Married Name 

Maiden Name Class 

Address Postal District No. 



A 




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Abbot Academy Bulletin 






February 



1947 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



OFFICERS, 1 946- 1 948 



President 

Mrs. Frank C. d'Elseaux 
(Virginia Gay) 
12 Sheffield Rd. 
Winchester, Mass. 

Vice-presidents 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
8 Carisbrooke Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Mrs. Russell T. Loesch 
(Polly Francis) 
3 Sears Avenue 
Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Tucker 
(Martha Elizabeth Ransom) 
632 Great Plain Road 
Needham, Mass. 



Clerk 

Mrs. George K. Sanborn 
(Frances Flagg) 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 

Mrs. Dino Olivetti 
(Rosamond Castle) 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 

Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
5 Morton Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 

Miss Marion MgPherson 
%}/2 Summer Street 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 



I942-I94 8 
Miss Margaret Van Voorhis 
304 Lexington Avenue 
New York City, N. Y. 



I945-I95I 
Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 
(Helen Allen) 
246 Glen Road 
Weston 93, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 

Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson 
(Gwendolyn Bloomfield) 
50 Windsor Road 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. J. Allen Lind 

(Mary Simpson) 
1239 Asbury Avenue 
Winnetka, 111. 

CONNECTICUT 

Miss Sara G. Peck 
20 Fair view Terrace 
Derby, Conn. 

DETROIT 

Mrs. Thomas Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
1 2 1 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Mich. 

MAINE, EASTERN 

Mrs. John H. McLoon 
(Frances McDougall) 
1 1 1 Beech St. 
Rockland, Maine 



MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
Portland, Maine 

NEW YORK 
Miss Gertrude E. Holbrook 
Stonecrest Apartments 
Larchmont, N. Y. 

OHIO CENTRAL 
Mrs. Paul Meek 
(Louise Norpell) 
Worthington, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 
Mrs. George Worthington 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 
Mrs. A. Scudder Moore 
(Ruth Murray) 
96 South Elm Street 
West Bridge water, Mass. 

PITTSBURGH 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
5 1 5 North McKean Street 
Butler, Pa. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 14 



FEBRUARY 1947 



Issue 2 



Table of Contents 



Alumnae Association Luncheon Invitation 
Abbot Academy Alumnae Clubs . 

Principal News 

Past Faculty Notes 

Grace Amy Goodman 

International Relations at Abbot 
The John-Esther Gallery . 

School Events 

The Senior Glass at Intervale . 

A Letter 

In Memoriam 

Alumnae Association 

Class News 



Lee Booth '48 



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THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 

Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, Editor-in-Chief 

Marion McPherson, 1918 

Virginia Gay d'Elseaux, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 




The Abbot Alumnae Association 

The Boston Abbot Club 
cordially invite you to attend a 

Spring puncheon 

Saturday, March the first 

at twelve-thirty o'clock 

Hotel Beaconsjield, Brookline 

SPECIAL GUESTS 

Miss Alice C. Sweeney, Acting Principal 

Miss Lucile Tuttle, Dean of Residence 

Members of the Senior Class 

PROGRAM 

Mile. Avant, Hollywood stylist, will give 

a one woman style revue, showing how to achieve 

economical smartness of dress and hats 



Luncheon $2.50. Please send reservations to Mrs. Margaret Nay Gramkow, 
609 Washington St., Wellesley, Mass., before February 26. 

To reach the Hotel Beaconsfield, 1731 Beacon St., take Beacon St. Reservoir 
car at the North Station. Ample parking space. 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Clubs 

WHY CLUBS? To bring together once or twice a year those who have Abbot as a 
common interest; who wish to keep in touch with the school, and maintain the friend- 
ships formed there. If there is any community in which live a number of alumnae who 
would like to organize and have a representative of the school visit them, please so inform 
the Alumnae Office. 

Note and attend the activities of clubs this year. 



THE BOSTON ABBOT CLUB (est. 1892) 
jjth Anniversary 

President, Mrs. Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson; Vice-presidents, Mrs. Vir- 
ginia Gay d'Elseaux, Mrs. Elizabeth Sage Batchelder; Recording Secretary, 
Mrs. Nancy Kelley Park; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Marion Ireland Conant; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Nay Gramkow; Auditor, Mrs. Mary Piper Sears; 
Program Chairman, Mrs. Faith Chipman Parker; Directors 1946-1948, Barbara 
Goss, Mrs. Mary Howard Nutting, Mrs. Jacqueline Proctor de Brun; Direc- 
tors 1945-1947, Mrs. Lydia Kunkel Eldredge, Miss Irene Atwood, Mrs. Ruth 
Baker Johnson. 

Wednesday, January 29, Miss Kate Friskin gave a piano recital at the 
College Club, at 2.30 p.m. A social hour with tea followed. 

Saturday, March 1, luncheon with the Abbot Alumnae Association, at 
the Hotel Beaconsfield, Brookline. Miss Alice C. Sweeney, Miss Lucile 
Tuttle and the Senior Class will be the special guests. Program by Mile. 
Avant, Hollywood stylist. 

Saturday, April 12, Annual meeting at the College Club. Dessert-Coffee 
at 1.30 p.m. 

THE CHICAGO ABBOT CLUB (est. 1921) 

President, Mrs. Mary Simpson Lind; Secretary, Mrs. Edith Bullen Creeden; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Hall Walker. 

A luncheon meeting will be held Wednesday, March 19, at Marshall 
Field's. Mrs. Chipman will bring the news from Abbot. 



THE CONNECTICUT ABBOT CLUB (est. 1923) 

President, Miss Sara Peck; Secretary- Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Lawton 
Wolfe. The annual meeting will be held in the spring. 



THE DETROIT ABBOT CLUB (est. 1922) 

25th Anniversary 

President, Mrs. Harriet Balfe Nalle. The Detroit alumnae entertained 
Miss Margaret Van Voorhis, alumna trustee, at luncheon on January 3, 
at the Women's City Club. Ten alumnae, who came despite bad weather, 
greatly enjoyed meeting her, and hearing her report of the school. A business 
meeting will be held later. 

THE MAINE EASTERN ABBOT CLUB (est. 1926) 

President, Mrs. Frances McDougall McLoon; Vice-president, Mrs. Louise 
Douglas Hill; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Annetta Richards Bryant. A meeting 
will be held in the summer. 

THE MAINE WESTERN ABBOT CLUB (est. 1922) 

25th Anniversary 

President, Mrs. Louise Houghton Wells; Treasurer, Miss Gladys Merrill; 
Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude Shackleton Hacker. The Club held a delightful 
meeting and tea on November 15, 1946, at the Country House, Falmouth. 
Twenty alumnae were present to welcome Mrs. Chipman and Mrs. Helen 
Allen Henry, alumna trustee. Mrs. Chipman spoke of the present day school, 
and Mrs. Henry "introduced" the members of the Board of Trustees. The 
club hopes to have a late spring meeting. 

THE NEW YORK ABBOT CLUB (est. 1898) 

President, Miss Gertrude Holbrook; Vice-presidents, Mrs. Laura Scudder 
Williamson, Mrs. Helga Lundin Buttrick; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Grace 
Leyser Boynton; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Mary Jane Owsley Warwick; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Ruth Cann Baker; Auditor, Mrs. Despina Plakias Messinisi; 
Directors, Mrs. Helen Bradley Hodgkinson, Mrs. Eunice Meigs Pease, Mrs. 
Ethel Thompson James. 

The Club held a luncheon meeting on December 7, at the Hotel Roose- 
velt. Special guests were Mrs. Mary Gorton Darling 1886, and Mrs. Virginia 
Gay d'Elseaux, president of the Alumnae Association. Miss Holbrook, presi- 
dent, read a letter from Mrs. Harriet Raymond Brosnan telling of the as- 
sembling of their famous collection of class letters, on exhibition at the club. 
These letters have kept an unbroken sequence for sixty years, comprising a 
large volume now. Mrs. Darling reported on the class, as well as bringing her 
own greetings. Mrs. d'Elseaux brought the alumnae and school news. 
Mrs. Carol Perrin Dunton 1921, then gave a delightful program of readings. 
Thirty were present. 

The annual meeting will be held on Saturday, April 19, at the Park Lane 
Hotel. Miss Margaret Van Voorhis, '18, alumna trustee, will give a song 
recital. 



THE OHIO CENTRAL ABBOT CLUB (est. 1921) 

President, Mrs. Louise Norpell Meek; Secretary, Mrs. Bettina Rollins 
Wheeler. A meeting will be held Saturday, March 15, in Columbus, to meet 
Mrs. Chipman. 

THE OHIO CLEVELAND ABBOT CLUB (est. 1927) 

20th Anniversary 

President, Mrs. Madeleine Fiske Worthington. On January 2, a few of 
the Cleveland group braved bad weather conditions and met Miss Margaret 
Van Voorhis at tea at Shaker Square Tavern. She reported a great eagerness 
from the alumnae to meet again, and the club hopes to have an annual 
meeting later. 

THE OLD COLONY ABBOT CLUB, (est. 1924) 

President, Mrs. Ruth Murray Moore; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Martha 
Wind Finger. The annual meeting will be held in October. 

THE PITTSBURGH ABBOT CLUB (est. 1921) 

President, Mrs. Gertrude Miller Jackson; Secretary, Mrs. Eliza Atwell 
Browne. 



Principal News 

Miss Hearsey is enjoying her varied vacation. She was at Abbot for the 
two opening days of school in September in order to greet the new girls and 
their parents and to see the old girls. Afterwards she went to Wellesley to 
be with her friend, Miss Ella Keats W 7 hiting, Dean of W r ellesley College. 
The middle of October she departed for Quebec and lived with a French 
family for six weeks. While there she made a trip to New York and back the 
early part of November for meetings of the Headmistresses' Association of 
the East. Just before Thanksgiving Miss Hearsey returned to Wellesley and 
then spent the Christmas holidays with her sister in New York. From there 
she went South visiting in Washington, Maryland, and at Hollins College in 
Virginia, her Alma Mater where she had taught before coming to Abbot. 
From February twelfth through the fifteenth she will be presiding at meetings 
in Atlantic City of the National Association of Principals of Schools for Girls, 
of which she has been President these past two years. On the nineteenth of 
February she and Miss Whiting, who also will be on a leave of absence, will 
sail from New York for Bermuda where they will have a house for three 
months. To the delight of all, Miss Hearsey will return in time for Commence- 
ment at Abbot. 



Past Faculty Notes 



Mile. Marthe Baratte, who was at Abbot last year, and whose sister, 
Mile. Marie Baratte, is at Abbot this year, is teaching French at Russell 
Sage College. 

Miss Florence Butterfield has been a recent welcome visitor at Abbot. 

Mrs. Alexander Calhoun with Mr. Calhoun left New York the middle 
of October and finally sailed from Vancouver to Manila, on a Swedish 
freighter, with only ten other passengers. According to present plans Mr. 
and Mrs. Calhoun will remain in Manila for some months and may not leave 
for India until summer. Their address is % The National City Bank of New 
York, % American Consul- General, A.P.O. 501, San Francisco, California. 

Miss Mary Carpenter is Dean at the Bouve-Boston School of Physical 
Education. 

Miss Helen Chickering lives at 1 Punchard Ave., Andover. 

Madame Marie Craig lives at 109 Main St., Andover. Greetings and 
calls from Abbot friends cheer her greatly. 

Miss Ruth Eager, who substituted in the English Department last year, 
is at Chatham Hall, Virginia. 

Miss Ruth Elvedt, who is with the Physical Education Department at 
Mount Holyoke, has published a book on canoeing, entitled "Canoeing 
A-Z." 

Miss Edith Hedin is working toward her Ph.D. degree from Radcliffe 
and Harvard in English and German. She is also teaching two classes of 
German at Radcliffe. 

Miss Martha Howey is living in San Francisco, with many interests to 
keep her busy. Twice a week she returns to the Branson School in Ross, to 
teach History of Art. During the summer she and Mrs. Agnes Slocum Biscoe 
paid a surprise visit to Andover. 

Miss Eleanor Little is on the Radcliffe Library staff this year. 

Miss Nellie Mason celebrated her eightieth birthday on January 14. The 
many cards, flowers and callers she received all helped to make it a very 
happy day. 

Miss Ivar Lou Myhr, who substituted in English last year, is head of the 
English Department at Ward Belmont Junior College, Nashville, Tennessee. 
Miss Jean Nevius is studying this year in New York. 

Mrs. Roberta Poland has been teaching science at Deerfield Academy, 
Deerfield, Mass., since 1943, when she went there to join her husband who 
had become a member of the faculty there the previous year. 

Miss Anne Rechnitzer is a member of the German Department at 
Wheaton College. 

Miss Helen Robinson has entirely recovered from her accident. She 
greatly enjoyed a visit at Abbot in the fall. 

Mrs. Lucretia Hildreth Saxl has travelled extensively throughout the 
United States with her husband on a combined business and pleasure trip 
this year. At present they are living at 6 Linnaean St., Cambridge. 



Grace Amy Goodman 

Secretary to the Principal, September ig^o — December ig^.6 

On December twenty-second Miss Goodman died in Pittsburgh, at the 
home of her brother where she had gone to spend the holiday. Although she 
had appeared to be in good health when she started her journey on the 
nineteenth, she was ill with a cold when she arrived, and after only a few 
days she suffered a heart attack which proved fatal. 

In announcing her death to the students on their return from the 
Christmas vacation, Miss Sweeney said : We who worked closely with her and 
knew her well are deeply conscious of the difference her absence makes be- 
cause we had grown to depend very much on her unique personality, on her 
bright and ready presence in the school. 

Miss Goodman was a truly punctilious person; she was punctilious not 
only in regard to the performance of her duties, but also in the details of her 
private living, and in her loyalties. She had the best interests of the school 
very much at heart. For instance she had planned to retire, and she would 
have given up her work here last summer if she had not seen that we had 
particular need of her services this year, if she had not felt that Miss Hearsey 
would go away with greater ease of mind and with more confidence in the 
smooth running of the offices if she stayed at her post part of this winter. So 
the plan was made for her not to leave until March when the enrolment for 
next year would be practically completed. 

She had thought not to announce her impending departure but simply 
to go away, as for the Easter holidays, and not return; because she was a very 
selfless and modest person, and she really believed that her absence would 
matter or be of interest to very few besides her immediate associates and her 
closest friends. Well, she slipped away; and the appreciation we would have 
liked to express to her remains unsaid ; but perhaps because she was a person 
of unusual reticence it is better so. Certainly I think that we shall retain 
longer a sense of her small, neat figure and bright, birdlike ways because they 
are etched a little more sharply on our minds and memory through the shock 
of her sudden death, because, too, the manner of her going was, in a way, 
as quick and considerate and detached as was her living. 




INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AT ABBOT 

Premi Arsirvatham, Madras, India; Genevieve Young, New York City; Felicia 
Tavares, West Indies; seated, Ines Herrera, Bogota, Colombia. 



The John-Esther Gallery 

Curator: W. Abbott Cheever 

February 1-15, Seventy-five Latin American Prints 

February 20, Tentative, Exhibition with Phillips Academy Art classes of Still 
Life arrangement contest 

March , Exhibition from Abbot's collection of paintings 

April 10-24, Nineteenth Century Leaders of Modern Painting 

May 15-June 10, Abbot Student Show 



8 



School Events 



Saturday, January n, Lecture, Mrs. Bonaro Overstreet, "The Art of Gracious 
Living." 

Sunday, January 12, Vespers, The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, Minister at 
Phillips Academy 

Saturday, January 18, Free evening, skating party 

Sunday, January ig, The Episcopal Church Tea 

Talk, Miss Elizabeth Reser, Representative of the Save the Children 
Federation, French Schools 

Friday, January 24 to Tuesday, January 28, Mid -Year Examinations 

Sunday, January 26, Vespers, Hymn Singing 

Tuesday, January 28 to January 30, Seniors at Intervale 

Saturday, February 1, Free evening, skating party 

Sunday, February 2, Vespers. The Reverend Alfred W. Burns, Lawrence 

Saturday, February 8, Concert, Miss Kate Friskin, Pianist 

Sunday, February g, Lecture — Mrs. Edward C. Carter, "International As- 
sembly of Women" 

Saturday, February ij, Abbot Fidelio-Governor Dummer School Concert, and 
Dance at Abbot 

Sunday, February 16, The Reverend James T. Cleland, D.D., Duke University 

Saturday, February 22, Concert, Ralph Sheldon, Pianist 

Sunday, February 23, 

Friday, February 28, French play, "Les Jours Heureux" by Andre Puget, Ab- 
bot and Phillips Academy at Phillips Academy 

Saturday, March 1, Second Open Forum 

Sunday, March 2, Students Recital 

Saturday, March 8, Senior Promenade 

Sunday, March g, Vespers, The Reverend John Wallace, Trinitarian Congre- 
gational Church, Concord 

Saturday, March 15, Students Recital 

Sunday, March 16, Vespers, Abbot Christian Association 

Saturday, March 22, Senior Play, "Quality Street" 

Sunday, March 23, The Reverend John T. Golding, Church of The Redeemer, 
Chestnut Hill 

Monday, March 24, Gym and Dance Exhibition 

Wednesday, March 26 to Tuesday, April 8, Spring Vacation 

IMPORTANT SPRING EVENTS 

Saturday, April 12, Recital by Miss Kate Friskin and Dorothy Minty, Violinist 
Saturday, April ig, Concert by Fidelio and the Exeter Glee Club at Exeter 
Saturday, May 3, Abbot Birthday Bazaar 
Friday, May 30 to Monday, June 2, Commencement 




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A Letter to a Girl 
"Who Has Always Heard About Abbot" 



Abbot Academy 
Dear Janey: 

I have heard that you don't want to come to Abbot, and that, as an 
alumna daughter you are rather tired of hearing about it. I am an alumna 
daughter, too, but the difference is that my Mother made Abbot sound 
awfully exciting because she was rather "bad" when she was here. In addi- 
tion, she used to tell me lots of anecdotes about the teachers and girls back 
in the twenties. So, if you think you're tired of hearing about Abbot ask your 
Mother for some of these, You'll love the stories. They so completely won me 
over to the idea of coming here that I made Mother send in my application 
as soon as I entered high school. Of course Abbot wasn't exactly like her 
stories, but I wasn't disappointed with the school. 

I don't love Abbot because it's old and has tradition. I don't like the 
school because I'll have an easier time getting into college from here than 
some other schools. Neither are the varied sports, the educational and cul- 
tural opportunities of going to school near Boston the magnets which keep me 
here. I realize the advantages of all this, nevertheless, and no doubt you've 
been hearing an awful lot about this angle of the school. That is the kind of 
thing that makes parents pick a school like Abbot, to be sure, but they aren't 
anything without the girls. 

Yes, the one best thing about coming to Abbot is meeting so many 
wonderful girls. You make "life friendships" here, or at least, lasting ones. I 
believe Mother still keeps in touch with some Abbot friends. In high school 
you just can't get to know people as well because you don't live with them. 
Simple things like playing tennis and going down town with people do much 
more to cement friendships than all the parties and things at home. Abbot is 
big enough to invite all types and kinds, but, nevertheless, our average girl is 
just plain nice, no different from girls most places except that you know her 
better. 

I don't see what else I can say to change your mind about Abbot, but if 
I have said all this right, you should be "rarin' to come. 



5? 



Sincerely, 

Lee Booth '48 



11 



In Memoriam 



1877 

Ellen Emerson, widow of Dr. Otis Cary, 
died on December 26, 1946, in Bradford, at 
the age of ninety years. 

Mrs. Cary's long life was one of notable 
service in the missionary field in Japan. She 
sailed as a bride in February, 1878, to Japan, 
and until 1920 she and her husband worked 
and taught among the Japanese people. 
She specialized in work among Japanese 
women and children, and was lovingly 
known among them as "Mother Cary." 
After their retirement from the American 
Board she and Dr. Cary served among the 
Japanese Churches in California and Utah. 
Dr. Cary died in 1932, and she returned to 
Japan for six years. After that she resided 
for a number of years at the Walker Mis- 
sionary Home in Auburndale, and more 
recently made her home in Bradford. She 
leaves three sons and one daughter. Rev. 
George E. Cary of Bradford, Dr. Walter Cary 
of Dubuque, Iowa, Rev. Frank Cary, Kobe 
College, Kobe, Japan and Miss Alice Cary, 
secretary for Japan with the American 
Board, now in Tokyo. Her granddaughter 
Helen Cary May graduated from Abbot in 

1935- 

> Gifts are being received for a simple me- 
morial for Mrs. Cary to be built somewhere 
in Japan, a room in a school, or help in re- 
storing some church. 

1880 

May Woodman, widow of Albert Swazey, 
died on October 16, 1946, in Portland, 
Maine. 

1883 

Caroline McCandless, widow of Edward 
P. Greeley, died September 17, 1946, in 
Sewickley, Pa. 

1884 

Fannie Hardy, widow of Rev. Jacob A. 
Eckstorm, died December 31, in Brewer, 
Maine. 

Mrs. Eckstorm's books on the Indians of 
Maine are considered authoritative on that 



early history. From her father she inherited 
a deep interest and knowledge, which in her 
books is made invaluable to readers and re- 
search workers interested in that period in 
the history of the state. 

1886 

Ann G. King died December 13, 1946, in 
Red Bluff, Cal. 

1888 

Sarah Foster, wife of the Rev. Frederick 
D. Greene, died suddenly in Florida, on 
January 31. For many years she and her 
husband were missionaries to the Armenians. 
She was an unusually friendly person, one 
of deep loyalties to her many friends and to 
her school. 

Besides her husband she is survived by four 
sons and fifteen grandchildren. Her oldest 
son Joseph, is a chemist in the Lederle Labor- 
atory at Peace River, N. Y. David is assistant 
principal in a school in Stockton, Cal., Ed- 
ward is assistant professor in psychology at 
the University of Michigan, and Dr. Phillips 
Greene, formerly with the Yale-in-China 
hospital, is now Dean of the Long Island 
College and Hospital. 

1890 

Mary L. Sanborn died in 1945. 



December 18, 



1897 

Mary E. Richards died 
1946, in Andover. 

1916 

Rachel Foster, wife of George W. Shaw, 
died in August 1 946. Besides her husband she 
leaves one daughter Sylvia. 

1921 

Sylvia Nicholson, wife of the Rev. Val- 
entine S. Alison, died on September 22, 
1946 in Addison, New York. Besides her 
husband she leaves three children, Valen- 
tine Jr., Mary Katherine and Thomas Keith 
Alison. 



12 



The Abbot Alumnae Association 

Commencement dates: May 30 to June 2; Alumnae Day May 31. 

Each yem returning alumnae are enth itic ovei the experience of 
"catching up" with the school and friends. A most sincere invitation u ex- 
tended to all alumnae tvho may find it possible to come back this year. Don't 
waif, for a special reunion, there is always someone present near your time, 
ready to greet you. A warm welcome awaits you from Abbot and the officers 
of the Alumnae Association. 

I he Alumnae Luncheon wif) be held in Bailey Hall, the beautiful school 
dining room at 1 p.m. At 2.45 the Annua) Meeting of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion will take place in Abbot Hall. An informal dinner will be served in the 
school dining room with the students. Special class reunions may be held at 
the luncheon, or arrangements made to be held elsewhere. The Draper 
Dramatics will provide a fitting close to the day. 

Special notices will be sent out in April, with the full Commencement 
program, but it is wise to make room reservations early. 

The Board of Trustees 

The Hoard of Trustees will hold their next meeting on April 1 1, in An- 
dover, at which time opportunity will be provided for them to meet the 
faculty of Abbot. 

Alumnae Trustees 

Margaret Van Voorhis and Helen Allen Henry have greatly enjoyed 
their recent meetings with alumnae groups. They hope for further oppor- 
tunities. 

Coffee Party 

The Alumnae Office gave its annual coffee party to the senior class, on 
Saturday, January 11. The girls, as usual appreciated the opportunity of 
getting acquainted with the office and its facilities, and realizing its signifi- 
cance to them when they have become alumnae. 

AMERICAN ALUMNI COUNCIL 

District 1 of the American Alumni Council will meet at Dartmouth 
College, Hanover, N. H., April 24 and 25. 



13 



Class News 



1884 

Eliza Newton Frary sends the following 
'welcome news of herself and family. "I was 
very much interested in the reunion picture 
•of the class of 1886, and especially that of 
Hattie Raymond, my close friend while at 
Abbot. News of myself includes my marriage 
on September 20, 1893 to George Frary, a 
graduate of Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 
We have three living children and eleven 
grandchildren, and three great grand- 
children. Most of my married life has been 
spent in Charlemont, where my husband 
•owned and conducted a wood turning 
business. My two sons are engaged in a wood 
turning business in Maine, and my daughter 
married a teacher and lives in Connecticut. 
I am now 81 years old." 

1886 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frank W. 
Darling (Mary Gorton), Hampton, Virginia. 

Mrs. Darling attended the meeting of the 
New York Club on December 7, when the 
famous class letter collection maintained by 
Mrs. Harriet Raymond Brosnan all the sixty 
years was on exhibition, and a letter from 
.her was read. 

1887 
Sixtieth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman : Miss Harriet Thwing, 
975 East Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Miss Thwing sends the following news of 
■classmates: 

Last summer Angie Dunton Purrington and 
•daughter Hilda had an interesting call on 
Sophia Walker Piper and gave her '87's an- 
nual class letters. I continue to hope that 
Hilda can take Angie and Sophia to our 
Sixtieth. Anna Bronson Root cannot be there 
for last week she fell and fractured her left 
hip. Jean Jillson and her sister are occupied 
with their home in California, gardening, 
church work and Red Cross work. Jeanie 
Carter Prall is the busiest member of '87. She 
helps her daughter Marion in her large 
nursery school, home cares, and church 
work. Eliza Atwell Browne fears it would be 
impossible for her to attend reunion. 



1892 

Fifty-fifth Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane B. Car- 
penter, 32 Shepard St., Apt. 22, Cambridge. 

1893 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Harry R. 
Miles (Anna Nettleton) , 4 Rock Ledge Drive, 
Stamford, Conn. 

1894 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Doremus 
Scudder (Mabel Bosher), 133 West Ninth 
St., Claremont, Cal. 

Mrs. Scudder who has had "eight glorious 
months visiting friends in Hawaii," is now 
back home in Claremont. 

1895 

Grace Simonton Young has a new grand- 
son, Timothy Castle, born in December to 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Young. 

1896 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Henry V. 
Conant (Ruth Loring) 914 High St., Ded- 
ham. 

Helen Marland Bradbury is recovering 
from a broken hip, at Clearwater, Florida. 

May Toung Duffy has a new grandson, 
George Jr., son of her younger boy. 

1897 

Fiftieth Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Alexander 
Bunce (Gertrude Ware), R.F.D. 1, Rock- 
ville, Conn. 

1898 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert W. 
Dunbar (Selina Cook), 3 Elk St., Apt. 7, 
Albany, N. Y. 

1900 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur P. 
Spear (Grace Chapman), 156 Winchester 
St., Brookline. 

Eleanor Thomson Castle shares grand- 
mother honors with Grace Simonton Young 
in the birth of a son, Timothy Castle to her 
daughter Lorna Castle Young. 



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1901 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Helen Hale, 
86 Knox St., Lawrence. 

1902 
Forty-fifth Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary and Reunion Chair- 
man: Mrs. Hezekiah Poor (Mildred 
Mooers), 37 Ames St., Lawrence. 

1903 

Mrs. Sarah Burnham French, mother of 
Helen B. French died on November 13, 
1946, in Nashua, N. H. 

1904 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. William O. 
Pettit (Elizabeth Winsor), 186 Livingston 
Ave., Brunswick, N.J. 

Mary Davis Lee and Marion Cooper met 
unexpectedly at the Boone Tavern Hotel at 
Berea College, on New Year's Day. From 
there they drove on to Florida together. 

1905 

The Rev. Charles H. Cutler, father of 
Frances Cutler Knickerbocker, died on 
November 10, 1946. Dr. Cutler was a trustee 
of Abbot from 1913 to 1940; and from 1926 
to 1 93 1 he taught the senior classes in Chris- 
tian Theism. 

1907 
Fortieth Reunion 

All Abbot girls know that five goes into 
forty eight times. So all you members of '07 
plan now to renew your youth by attending 
our eighth! reunion, May 30 to June 2. 
Alice Webster Brush 
1 108 Adams St., 
Dorchester Lower Mills, Mass. 
Reunion Chairman 

1909 

Helen Mills Farnsworth's oldest daughter, 
Helen Worthen, has a second son, born 
November 22, 1946. 

1910 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Myron *G. 
Darby (Ethel Reigeluth), 110 Tanglewylde 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Please send any change of address to the 
Alumnae Office! 



1911 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Douglas 
Donald (Edith Johnson), 8 Carisbrooke St., 
Andover. 

Marion Brown has been elected governor 
of the fourth district of Quota International, 
an organization of professional and business 
women. 

Loea P. Howard, father of Miriam Howard 
Bushnell died December 25, 1946. 

1912 
Thirty-fifth Reunion 

1913 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Margaret 
Wilkins, 279 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 

1914 

Class Fund Secretary Mrs. Lowell Sloan 
(Elsie Gleason), 65 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. 

1916 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. James E» 
Downs (Laura Cheever), Bancroft Rd. r 
Andover. 

1917 
Thirtieth Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Oliver D, 
Wescott (Dorothy Small), 84 Main St., Nan- 
tucket. 

Greetings to you girls of 191 7. Believe it 
or not we are nearing our 30th Reunion. 
Plan now to be back at Abbot, May 30 to 
June 2, especially May 3 1 , for Alumnae Day. 

Miriam Bacon Chellis 
15 Raymond Ave., 
Beverly, Mass. 

Reunion Chairman 

1918 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George J. 
Cutler (Velma Rowell), 45 Eliot St., Jamaica 
Plain. 

Katharine Righter Morris's daughter Mary- 
Ann attends Randolph-Macon College. 

Mary Davis Irwin writes of her family 
move to Cornish Flat, N. H., where her son 
George Jr., bought an automobile agency 
in Claremont. Her daughter Melissa and 
son George, are planning weddings in June. 
Marjorie attends a Junior College in New 
Haven, Conn, and John goes to Claremont 
Junior High. 



15 



QUESTION AND ANSWER!!! 

"I have been wondering why I was not receiving my copies of 
The Abbot Bulletin, when suddenly the last issue, October, 1946, 
arrived having been forwarded from several former addresses. 
Only then did I understand the reason. I had failed to let the 
Alumnae Office know of change of name and various addresses." 

Graduate of 1943 



1919 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Grace L. 
Boynton (Grace Leyser),30 Engle St., Ten- 
any, N. J. 

Elizabeth Luce Moore is chairman of the 
Round-the-World Y.W.C.A. Reconstruction 
Campaign. 

Margaret Taylor Stainton's husband, Rob- 
ert Stainton, is teaching at Case School in 
Cleveland where he is Professor of Mechan- 
ical Engineering. Her son Bob attends The 
Putney School in Vermont. 

1920 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Beverly Hub- 
bard (Muriel Moxley), 172 Putnam Ave., 
Hamden, Conn. 

1921 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. David H. 
Bigelow (Marion Kimball), 326 Highland 
St., West Newton. 

1922 
Twenty-fifth Reunion 

Well girls (or are we, still?) this is it. Yes 
sir, twenty-five years have elapsed since our 
then, sylph-like figures adorned the learned 
halls of Abbot and it seems altogether fitting 
and proper that those still able to perambu- 
late should cast their husbands loose from 
their apron strings for a couple of days and 
join in celebrating this memorable occasion. 

Be ye warned, therefore, to set aside the 
three days from May 30 to June 2nd, with 
special emphasis on May 31st, Alumnae 
Day. Tell your husband you need the car 
then and not to ask a lot of questions. 

In the meantime be thinking of the news 
you're going to give me when I write you all 
individually later on. Full and complete 
particulars of everything that has happened 



to you since you left, whether it seems im- 
portant or not, will be grist for the mill. 

So — circle the dates on the calendar, warn 
your kith and kin they'll have to shift for 
themselves, that you'll come back (probably) 
sadder, perhaps, but a little wiser and with 
many happy memories of days well spent in 
the fond embrace of your old Alma Mater. 
See you then. 

Janet Warren Winslow 
57 Pinewood Road, 
Needham, Mass. 
Reunion Chairman 

Olive Howard Vance writes of their move 
to a newly purchased home at 52 W. Central 
St., Natick, and all the problems of moving. 
"The joy of our days is the beautiful grand- 
son, William Bradford, born to Gale (my 
class baby) and Jeanne on August 10. Car- 
olyn our oldest daughter was graduated 
from Sargent College last May, and is now 
at the V. A. Hospital in Bedford. Peter and 
Polly are both in senior high and busy all 
the time. My husband, Bill, opened a shop 
in the Charlesgate Hotel. He has a beautiful 
showroom and carries a line of gifts. I have 
made most of the slip covers and draperies 
for Bill's business. With those orders, and 
the normal demands of an eleven-room 
house and a family of seven, you can see why 
my social life is limited! I wonder if I am the 
first to be a grandmother in the class of 1922. 
I was first married and had the first child. 

Elizabeth Hutchinson Graham was in these 
parts in September, entering her eldest at 
Endicott Junior College. During the Christ- 
mas shopping I met Peg Potter Kensinger 
looking as sweet and pretty as ever." 

Marian Rugg Cay wood says, "There's 
nothing exciting about what I'm doing but 
I always look under our class notes for any 
news of the other girls so I can say 'Hello' 



16 



anyway. My 'worthwhile' leisure goes 
chiefly to 'drive' work. Symphony, Opera, 
Red Gross, Community Chest, etc. Our one 
child, Abby, now 14, is a freshman at Mary 
Institute, old enough to wish she were at 
Abbot." 

Elizabeth Whittemore is Executive Direc- 
tor for the Girl Scouts of Oahu and Kauai, 
two of the islands of the Hawaiian group. 
"It's been fascinating for I have lived thru 
the ten o'clock blackout and frequent air 
raid alarms, the tensions of getting ready for 
the victory push, peace and terrific after 
peace adjustment. I've come out with a 
tremendous respect and liking for the peoples 
of these islands. You should see some of my 
training courses. In the same group we'll 
have whites, Hawaiians, Chinese, Japanese 
(whom I like by the way), Portuguese, 
Filipinos, and half a dozen mixtures of 
each." 

1923 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Sterling Dow 
(Elizabeth Flagg), 36 Holden St., Cam- 
bridge. 

Sybil Kidder was married last August to 
Irvine H. Paris, Address: Bank of Hawaii, 
Honolulu 2. 

Engaged: Miriam Sweeney to Frank 
McArdle. 

1924 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. John 
Holden (Polly Bullard), 39 Mt. Pleasant St., 
Middlebury, Vermont. 

Barbara Loomer is president of the Mer- 
rimack Valley Wheaton Club. 

1925 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George B. 
Beveridge (Charlotte Hanna), Sanfordtown 
Rd., Redding, Conn. 

Time to enter that daughter in Abbot for 
1947 and 1948. Write for a catalogue. 

1927 
Twentieth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Sydna White, 391 
Bleecker St., New York City, 14. 

Katharine Keany is Information Assistant, 
office of International Information and Cul- 
tural Affairs of the American Embassy in 
Buenos Aires. 



Lucy Sanborn writes, "Since early in 
November I have been working as supervisor 
for Child and Family Service, a private 
social work agency in Honolulu." 

Sydna White is still in New York promot- 
ing her filmstrip on world government, 
called "How to Conquer War." There are 
900 prints of it in circulation, and in the last 
year it has been shown in several foreign 
countries. It was shown at the first interna- 
tional conference of world government or- 
ganizations in Luxumbourg in October. 

1928 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Emily Sloper, 
36 Russell St., New Britain, Conn. 

Helen Leavitt Fisher and her husband are 
now living in Blooming Grove, New York. 
They are serving a church there, while they 
both take graduate work at Union Seminary 
in New York. "We are finding the study of 
Hebrew and Greek intensely interesting 
with better years to come as we delve in the 
fascinating subjects of Biblical study. Wilkin c 
now four years old, is fine and very active.', 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Coggins 
(Marion Quin) a daughter Ann Beecher, 
October 16, 1945. 

1929 

In the January Atlantic appeared a charm- 
ing letter written by Louise Hollis Black to 
Mr. Weeks, the Editor. 

Rosamond Wheeler says, "Not a single 
note about 1929 in the last Bulletin! Re- 
cently I flew down to New York for a reun- 
ion of Smith College Juniors in France, 
getting back just in time to lecture in Sever 
Hall, Harvard, for the University Extension 
Course on "Enrichment of Adult Life." 
I also write for the jobs and futures depart- 
ment in Mademoiselle magazine in addition 
to my regular work in the society depart- 
ment of the Boston Herald. Polly Francis 
Loesch looked younger then ever recently, 
in spite of her lively twins." 

1930 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Jack R. War- 
wick (Mary Jane Owsley), 26 Ledgewood 
Rd., Bronxville, New York. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. W. Gardner 
Barker 2nd. (Milda Allen), a son, Bruce 
Allen, November 9, 1946. 

Alma Hill writes, "My days are quite full 
with women's club activities. I am chairman 



17 



of the Department of American Home and 
Division of Family Finance for the New 
Hampshire Federation of Women's Clubs." 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Hol- 
land (Barbara Healey) a daughter Elizabeth 
Anne, December 12, 1946. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. George R. Struck 
(Christine Hollands), a second son, George 
Christian, September 27, 1946. 

Katharine Phelps Richardson lives now 
in Arlington, Virginia. Col. Richardson 
served five years in the war, and is now Ad- 
ministrative Analyst in the office of the 
Quartermaster General in Washington. She 
has two children, Sally and Nancy. 

1931 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Francis Hol- 
land (Barbara Graham), 644 Orchard St., 
East Lansing, Mich. 

Flora Collins has been living in Santa 
Monica, Cal., since 1943. At present she is 
secretary to Jose Iturbi. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Fernando Aldana 
(Barbara Kidder), a daughter Patricia, 
November 13, 1946, in Guatemala City. 

1932 
Fifteenth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Miss Betty Boyce, 
i'54 Main St., Andover. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Dorothy 
Richardson, Boston Road, Billerica. 

Born: To Major and Mrs. John E. Love- 
lock (Cynthia James), a daughter Mary 
Rutherford, September 18, 1946. Cynthia 
writes, "We have recently moved to this 
address, and it would appear to be reason- 
ably permanent, though we have hopes of 
crossing the Atlantic from time to time. I 
wish I could be at reunion this year." Ad- 
dress: 34 Devonshire Place, London, W.i, 
England. 

Married: Virginia Lawton Cheney to 
Lieut, (jg) LeRoy S. Wolfe Jr., November 
30, 1946. Lieut. Wolfe is stationed at the 
N.O.B. Dispensary, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 

Married: Julia Wilhelmi Dodane to Major 
George Lindahl, U.S.A., September 26, 
1946. 

1933 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert D. 
Johnson (Margaret Chase), 100 Stuyvesant 
Place, St. George, Staten Island, N. Y. 



Clara Shaw is working as secretary to the 
Headmaster of the Pomfret School, in Pom- 
fret, Conn. 

1934 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Savage Jr. 
(Mary Flaherty), a daughter, Ellen Draper, 
December 26, 1946. 

Born: To Dr. and Mrs. George S. Robin- 
son (Dorothy Lambert) twin daughters, 
Bradlee Ellen and Merrilee Ann, December 
19, 1946. 

1935 

Married: Lenore Buckley to Major Vin- 
cent A. Hurley, July 13, 1946. She lives at 
1620 Enderly Place, Fort Worth, Texas, 
where Major Hurley is an insurance under- 
writer. 

Helen Cary May's husband is case super- 
visor of the Department of Welfare in Green- 
wich, Conn. They live in Riverside, Conn. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John H. McClen- 
nan (Jane Dawes), a daughter Susan, 
October 17, 1946. 

Patricia Smith Magee writes that she has 
been married six years, has one son Mark, 
and lives in Marblehead. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon L. Land 
(Ernestine Look) a second child, a son, 
November 5, 1946. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Lin- 
coln (Barbara Waite) a third son, Jeffrey 
Charles, July 20, 1946. Anthony Seabury 
was born January 15, 1944. The first son 
died January 1, 1943. 

1936 

Married: Harriott Cole to Paul F. Fox 
January 25. Her sister Ann Cole Gannett 
was matron of honor, Eleanor Cole (aff. '42) 
and Hope Humphreys were among the 
maids of honor. 

Notify the Alumnae Office at once of any 
change of address. 

1937 
Tenth Reunion 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur W. 
Tucker (Martha E. Ransom), 632 Great 
Plain Rd., Needham. 

Dr. John J. McArdle Jr., husband of Nancy 
Burns, has opened an office in Andover for 
the practice of medicine and surgery. 



18 



1938 

Elise Duncan writes that she and her 
sister Virginia (aff. '41) are working at Lord 
and Taylor in New York. 

Engaged: Madeleine Proctor to the Rev. 
Donald R. Woodward, rector of the Church 
of the Incarnation, Lynn. 

1939 

Frederick A. Peterson Jr., husband of 
Nancy Lee Burnett, has been appointed in- 
structor in the department of English at 
Phillips Academy. 

Engaged: Frances Cross to Dr. Francis 
Seymour Jones. 

Married: Patricia Goss to James Scott 
Rhodes, September 14, 1946. Address: 3 
Giffard St., Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

From Dorothy Heidrich we learn: "At 
present I am an assistant teacher in a nur- 
sery school of eighteen youngsters and am 
enjoying this work immensely, but hope to 
slip away for two weeks in February for a 
trip to Wyoming to ski. I'm also working 
with the Children's Theatre Series here 
which is sponsored by our Junior League. 
For this year I 'caught' the job of chairman 
of the Ticket Committee." 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. William W. Town- 
son (Eleanor Martin) a son, Douglas Castle 
II, October 11, 1946. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm K. 
Smith Jr. (Lloyd Pierce) a second daughter, 
Diana Gates, October 20, 1946. "Cynthia is 
three years old, very large and active and 
full of chatter, and is enjoying nursery 
school immensely." The Smiths have bought 
a house in Darien, Conn. 



Keep the Alumnae Office informed of 
changes of address! 



1940 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Edmund W. 
Nutting (Mary Howard), 213 Common- 
wealth Ave., Boston. 

Frances Chandler Partridge writes: "We 
are very well situated here in Germany. We 
are living in an Army Community just out- 
side the base and have a typical stucco Ger- 
man house. Right now our life is a bit prim- 
itive since we have no heat in the house 
except for fires that we built in our two little 



stoves. I cook on a wood stove and heat all 
of our water in a boiler in the bathroom. 
Naturally this is not what we are used to, 
but we manage very well. We have a marvel- 
ous German maid who is very agreeable. 
Most of the Germans are nice, but you have 
to watch them pretty closely. We are taking 
German lessons. My husband is with the 
Replacement Depot for all Army Air Force 
men in the European Theater. New men 
come in here every day to be assigned to a 
permanent base in the theatre. He also does 
some flying, so is kept pretty busy. 

We are pretty free to go where we want 
and when we want. Naturally there is not 
much we can buy in the German stores as it 
all is rationed. The Army offers you a won- 
derful opportunity as far as travel goes. We 
have just returned from Switzerland and 
Italy. Every six months we can take a leave 
and thus enable us to see quite a lot of 
Europe. 

I think there are a couple other Abbot 
graduates who are over here." 

Married: Mary Howard to Edmund 
Washburn Nutting, November 26, 1946. 

Married: Nadene Nichols to Robert 
Douglas Lane, January 4. 

Married: Anne Rivinius to Robert Pres- 
cott Wild, November 2, 1946. Her sister, 
Ellen Rivinius Hill '35, was one of her at- 
tendants. 

Married: Priscilla Russ to John P. Shan- 
non Jr., August 18, 1946. 

Frank M. Travis, father of Elizabeth 
Travis Sollenberger 1940 and Margaret 
Travis 1944, died on November 25, 1946 in 
Torrington, Conn. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Donald Bramley 
(Joan Wyatt) a son, Peter Wyatt, November 
7> 1946. . 

1941 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frederick S. 
Kremer (Sue Long), 130 East 74th St., 
New York City. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. William W. Bod- 
dington (Jo Hartwell) a son, John Hartwell, 
September 24, 1946. 

Jane Philbin graduated from Radcliffe 
last September, and is now enjoying her 
work as an assistant secretary in the office of 
Nelson Rockefeller in New York. 

Engaged: Eleanor Rafton to Harold N. 
Gordon. 



19 



1942 
Fifth Reunion 

Married: Helen Craig to Jerome Thomas 
Jarrold, November 30, 1946. Her sister 
Janet '45, was her maid of honor. 

Married: Margaret Janssen to Joseph 
Rockhill Gray, December 27, 1946. 

Engaged : Janice Lenane to Walter Irving 
Scott Jr. 

Engaged: Louise Leslie to Alfred J. Oxen- 
ham. 

Married: Barbara Sanders to Wilton Wells 
Dadmun, January 1 7. 

Engaged: Margaret Stuart to James Mar- 
tin Beale. 

Rose Wind is a case worker in the Brock- 
ton Family Service Organization. 

Married: Ann Zeitung to Nathan Strong 
Hale, December 21, 1946. 

1943 

Helen Barss received her diploma from 
the Boston School of Occupational Therapy 
on December 14, 1946. 

Engaged: Mary Alice Beckman to Peter 
Huidekoper. 

Engaged: Nancy Corwin to William A. 
Wintter. 

Married: Elizabeth Garratt to Frank Ed- 
ward Taylor, May 25, 1946. 

Engaged: Gertrude Hamper to Edward 
Hearsey Barry Jr. 

Engaged: Marjorie Ann Lehmann to Ben 
Moats. 

Married: Anne Locke to Howard Haman 
Jr., September 20, 1946. Mr. Haman is a job 



analyst in the Kingsbury Ordnance Plant 
in LaPorte, Ind. 

Lt. Col. and Mrs. Louis B. Hess (Betty- 
Lou Monett) are spending the winter in 
Miami Beach, Florida. They made the trip 
in their cruiser the "Amity," via the Intra- 
coastal Waterway from New Jersey to 
Florida. 

Married: Winifred Tucker to Marvin 
Hibshman, January 16, 1946. 

1944 

Married: Aagot Hinrichsen to John E. 
Cain Jr., August 17, 1946. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. James A. Wilson 
(Patricia Chandler) a son, Jeffrey James, 
September 17, 1946, in London, England. 

Engaged: Charlotte Trow to Earl Albert 
Young. 

Alva Houston Davis with her small son, 
has recently joined her husband in China. 

1945 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Shirley Som- 
mer, 1367 Brown Hills Rd., Rockford, 111. 

Please send wedding announcements to 
the Alumnae Office. Keep the office in- 
formed on changes of address. 

1946 
First Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Sally V. Allen, Briar- 
cliff Junior College, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Mary Burton, 
33 Afterglow Way, Montclair, N. J. 



20 



u 



RITE news about yourself and others for the May Bulletin. Tear out 
and mail before April i, to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, 
Andover, Mass. 



4° 

O' 



Married Name 

Maiden Name Glass 

Address ' Postal District No. 




gfobot &catiemp bulletin 



Mm 1947 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 

Mrs. Frank C. d'Elseaux 

(Virginia Gay) 
12 Sheffield Rd. 
Winchester, Mass. 

Vice-presidents 

Mrs. Douglas Donald 
(Edith Johnson) 
8 Carisbrooke Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Mrs. Russell T. Loesgh 
(Polly Francis) 
3 Sears Avenue 
Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Tucker 
(Martha Elizabeth Ransom) 
632 Great Plain Road 
Needham, Mass. 



OFFICERS, 1 946- 1 948 

Clerk 



Mrs. George K. Sanborn 
(Frances Flagg) 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 

Mrs. Dino Olivetti 
(Rosamond Castle) 
Andover, Mass. 

Social Secretary 

Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker) 
5 Morton Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Executive Secretary 
Miss Marion McPherson 
3^2 Summer Street 
Andover, Mass. 



ALUMNAE TRUSTEES 



I943-I94 8 
Miss Margaret Van Voorhis 
304 Lexington Avenue 
New York City, N. Y. 



I945-IQ5 1 
Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 
(Helen Allen) 
246 Glen Road 
Weston 93, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 

Mrs. Arthur W. Tucker 
(Martha E. Ransom) 
632 Great Plain Rd. 
Needham, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. Roger Robbins 
(Carolyn Cross) 
800 McKinley St. 
Geneva, Illinois 

CONNECTICUT 

Mrs. Russell Haigis 
(Martha Tuttle) 
30 Liberty St. 
New Britain 

DETROIT 

Mrs. Thomas Nalle 
(Harriet Balfe) 
121 1 Willow Lane 
Birmingham, Mich. 

MAINE, EASTERN 

Mrs. John H. McLoon 
(Frances McDougall) 
1 1 1 Beech St. 
Rockland, Maine 



MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
Eastland Hotel 
Portland, Maine 

NEW YORK 
Mrs. Grace L. Boynton 
(Grace Leyser) 
30 Engle St. 
Tenafly, N.J. 

OHIO CENTRAL 

Mrs. Coburn Wheeler 

(Bettina Rollins) 

2644 Berwyn Rd. 

Columbus, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 
Mrs. George Worthing ton 
(Madeleine Fiske) 
Chesterland, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 
Mrs. A. Scudder Moore 
(Ruth Murray) 
96 South Elm Street 
West Bridge water, Mass. 

PITTSBURGH 
Mrs. George H. Jackson 
(Gertrude Miller) 
515 North McKean Street 
Butler, Pa. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 14 



MAY 1947 



Issue 3 



Alden Obeying ig^y 



3 

5 

7 
8 



Table of Contents 

Page 
Cover Photograph: . . Phyllis Rairdon, Joyce Merrick 1946 

Frontispiece: Abbot Dolls at Hindman School Elizabeth Watts 

Hindman Settlement School 

Photograph: Students at Hindman School 

Abbot Christian Association 

World Student Service Fund 

Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe 

Christine von Goeben ig^y 

Meals for Millions 

Cum Laude Society 

Events Spring Term 

Photograph: Abbot Academy, 1946 

Abbot Alumnae Association 

A Memory 

Abbot Clubs 

In Memoriam 

Class News 



Elizabeth Watts igoy 

Virginia Eason ig^y 
Barbara Turner ig^y 



Carolyn McLean ig^y 



9 
10 

10 

1 1 

12 

*3 

13 

15 

18 

18 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 

Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, Editor-in-Chief 

Marion McPherson, 1918 

Virginia Gay d'Elseaux, 1929, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



Abbot Dolls 
on Christmas 
Morning 




" 








Elizabeth Watts, 
Abbot '07, standing 

in the doorway 

of Uncle Solomon's 

house 



Hindman Settlement School — Where the 

Dolls Go 

Elizabeth Watts, Abbot 1907, Executive Director 

Abbot Academy has known about Hindman longer than I have! A thing 
I never lived down with Miss Pettit and Miss Stone, the founders of Hindman 
Settlement School, was that they came to Abbot one Saturday afternoon, 
while I was a student there, to tell about Hindman and I have absolutely no 
recollection of it! It would have been wonderful to be able to tell them that I 
got inspiration for my life work from their talks. Instead, when they spoke 
of having been there, I looked blank. I must have been absent that day. I 
know I couldn't have heard them and forgotten. But, in my case, opportunity 
knocked twice. The next time, I heard, and in 1909 I came to Hindman to 
stay for one year. I have been here ever since. 

The journey to Hindman in 1909 was very different from the comfortable 
drive over a good road you would have if you came here now. I was met at 
the railroad by sixteen-year-old Shadrach who had never seen a train before. 
He had brought a horse for me to ride the forty miles to the school and I had 
never been on a horse's back in my life. Each of us thought the other very 
queer! How I wish I had a picture of us as we started out! I was riding side- 
saddle, wearing a dark blue foulard silk dress, and jauntily carrying my 
umbrella, while Shadrach balanced my suit-case in front of his saddle on the 
other horse. It seemed to me as I left the single street of the little railroad 
town that I was going into a veritable maze of hills, and I didn't see how any 
one could find his way, certainly not a boy who had already told me he had 
never been there before. My fears were increased when — after jogging along 
a while — he said we had made a wrong turn and would have to go back. 
After we had retraced our steps and made another turn, we came to a wide 
stream, and there was no bridge. I was sure we were lost, but not so! Fording 
a creek was part of the journey, and we plunged in until the water came to 
our stirrups. Fortunately it came no farther, and we were on our way. As we 
couldn't make Hindman that day, we "took the night" on Goose Creek. The 
next morning riding was agony for my sore muscles, especially when the 
horses speeded up as we drew nearer the Settlement where they knew, and I 
soon found, a warm welcome awaited us. 

I have loved Hindman and its people ever since that day. Gathered 
around the open fire in the beautiful Log Settlement House, I heard from 
Miss Pettit and Miss Stone the story that I had missed that day at Abbot. 
They told of Uncle Solomon Everage and his plea: "When I was just a chunk 
of a boy hoeing corn on the steep hillsides, I used to look up Troublesome 
Creek and down Troublesome Creek and wonder if anybody would ever 
come in to larn us anything. I cain't read and write; some of my children 



cain't read and write; but I've got grandchildren and great-grandchildren 
just as bright as any in the world and I want them to have a chance." They 
told of their response to that plea, of their starting in tents, cloth houses, the 
people called them — and of the growth of the school since then. 

I had come to help out in any way I could; but after a month or so the 
primary teacher left because of illness at home and I took over her work — the 
first three grades with over a hundred enrolled and an average attendance of 
ninety! But I loved it! After a big fire in January when we lost practically 
everything we had, the people expressed their need of the school so whole- 
heartedly that I changed my feeling that I had come for one year to one of 
wanting to "take up" here indefinitely. Fire, flood, epidemics, depression and 
two wars haven't changed me, for I have seen the school and community 
grow, and watched our graduates go forth to take their places in the world in 
a manner that would be gratifying to any school anywhere. 

From the beginning the Settlement has supplemented the work of the 
local public school. At first the supplement part was many times greater than 
what the County was able to supply. The Settlement chose all the teachers 
and paid most of them. It provided the buildings and equipment. Gradually 
through the years, as many of our young people graduated from Hindman 
and from college, they became qualified to take more of the positions. A 
quotation from a paper written by the wife of the County-appointed principal 
of the Hindman Schools tells the story of the change the years have brought. 

She says: "The theory of the Settlement seems to be that the community 
should take all the responsibility that it can as soon as it is capable of doing 
so. Dr. Rubado who is assistant supervisor of the Louisville City Schools once 
made the statement in a class which I had under him, that the Hindman 
Settlement School was one of the few organizations in the country to have 
successfully coordinated with a county school system. They have done a 
remarkable job of nurturing the school system until the day when it could 
stand on its own feet. With the set-up as it now stands, the school could run 
with its own machinery, but without the aid of the Settlement it would be 
just another ordinary county school system. With the aid of the Settlement it 
is much more than that. The Settlement provides — a wonderful up-to-date 
library with a most capable librarian; it provides for home economics, weav- 
ing, manual training, art, music, a Fireside Industries Department and super- 
vised recreation. 

In addition to provisions for these finer arts, the Settlement provides a 
home for many boys and girls from throughout Knott and adjoining counties. 
For a small fee the student receives much more than he himself realizes. To 
many of them it means the only opportunity for a High School education. 
The school busses which run only along the main highways can serve only 
those students within walking distance of the highway. In the dormitories, the 
children find not only a comfortable room, but also a housemother with a 
personal and genuine interest in each of her charges. Here they learn to live 
and work together harmoniously and here they learn those little niceties and 
courtesies that a public school alone could never teach." 



Hindman 
Girls Canning 




rf? ,T '^' r " 



mm 

. :- :.'. 












Elizabeth Watts with a group of Settlement boys 



Our Recreation Director reaches more children than anyone else on our 
staff. She visits the country schools, driving the station wagon up creeks and 
hollows and playing with all the children she finds. They look forward to the 
coming of the "Play Lady" and because they expect to find her in it, whether 
she is or not, the station wagon is hailed with joy by any children it passes. 
Here in Hindman she has an extensive Folk Dance program and is in charge 
of dramatics, presenting one or two good plays each year. At Christmas there 
is always a Nativity Play. With the music department helping her, they make 
it an altogether lovely thing. 

Speaking of Christmas brings me back to Abbot, for Abbot's share in 
Hindman's Christmas has been great as long as I have been here. I'll never 
forget the thrill I had the first time I helped open boxes that Abbot girls had 
sent. There were so many lovely things for boys and girls of all ages. And then 
there were the dolls! Each year they have come, and each year we marvel as 
we unpack them and look at their dainty, or jaunty, costumes, and think of 
the endless time that Abbot girls have put into them. Then we think of the 
endless pleasure they will give to the girls who get them, and we know that if 
the girls who dressed the dolls could have gone all the way with them to 
their new homes, they would have felt that the time they put into them was 
worth while. 

Some of them go to big girls and some to little ones, for mountain girls 
of all ages love dolls. We have to plan carefully, so many for the girls who will 
be in the Settlement to hang their stockings Christmas Eve, so many for the 
Baby Party at Kindergarten, so many for the Possum Trot Sunday School, 
and we mustn't forget some for the Recreation Director to take out to the 
schools. Then of course there are the families — families who will have little 
or no Christmas unless we play Santa Claus. When there are four, five, six, 
or seven girls in one family — and there often are — it has to be decided whether 
more than one doll can go to a family and, if so, what ages will be the lucky 
ones. Care had to be taken this year for the two families that had had their 
homes, and as one man put it "all I owned but my wife and children," burned 
up. A pretty one went to the little girl who leads her blind father everywhere 
he goes. Her mother is blind, too. 

Abbot girls will never know the joy their dolls have given. A Settlement 
girl who didn't stay for the stocking hanging on Christmas Eve said, when she 
came back and saw the doll one of the girls was playing with, "I reckon I'll 
stay here for Christmas next year instead of going home. It seems as if I 
couldn't stand it not to have one of those dolls." 

All through the years the dolls have strengthened my link with Abbot. 
When the Christmas gifts come, and in the spring when the check to help pay 
a scholarship arrives, I am made happy in knowing that the school that did 
so much for me is interested in helping the girls and boys in the Hindman 
Settlement School. Even though I didn't first hear about Hindman at Abbot, 
as I should have, the two schools will always be closely associated in my heart. 



Abbot Christian Association 

Virginia Eason, 1947, President 

From year to year the A.C.A. work changes a little, but, on the whole, it 
stays pretty well the same. We still appoint "old girls" to "new girls" and ask 
them to look after the "new girls" the first days of school and escort them to 
the "Old Girl-New Girl" picnic and party. The Athletic Association has 
charge of the picnic, but the Christian Association gives the party. This year 
we had a "Hairdressing and Hat Contest" in Davis Hall with charades and 
refreshments following, and we ended the evening by listening to Miss Friskin 
play. 

We turned the making of the dolls, usually done by the seniors, to send to 
the Hindman School in the mountains of Kentucky, for Christmas, over to 
the underclassmen this year. Ninety dolls were dressed, and we exhibited 
them in the lobby, outside the library, so that the three best dressed dolls 
could be chosen by vote. 

Early in December the dolls and the presents, both the useful gifts and 
toys which the girls bought and wrapped for Hindman, were sent. As usual, 
we received a lovely letter of thanks from Miss Elizabeth Watts, treasurer and 
executive director of Hindman. 

The Saturday before Christmas vacation we gave the annual Christmas 
Party for the underprivileged children of Andover. At least fifty children 
arrived for the games, the Christmas play given by the senior-mids, the re- 
freshments, and, best of all, the presents which were delivered by Santa him- 
self from the big tree on the stage. We sent each beaming child home with his 
present, a shiny penny, and an orange for remembrance. 

The next day, Sunday, the A.C.A. officers delivered a basket of fruit and 
some Christmas dollars to the old folks at the Andover Infirmary. There were 
only five men there this year, but they appreciated our gifts a great deal. 

We also gave the Christmas Vesper Service early in December. The 
candlelight service was conducted by two of the officers of the Christian 
Association. Carols, and the Christmas story which was read gave us the first 
feeling of the Christmas spirit. 

After Christmas we raised $478.09 for the Red Cross by a one hundred 
per cent contribution from both the faculty and the employees, and almost 
one hundred per cent from the girls. 

About this time the "Meals for Millions" and C.A.R.E. packages, about 
which you will read later, were started. 

Usually the donations to various organizations, except for the Commu- 
nity Chest, are not sent out until after we have received our share of money 
from the Abbot Birthday Bazaar. This year we had so many appeals and the 
treasury was so well filled that we sent them out before spring vacation. The 
contributions were as follows: Hindman Settlement School $100.00; National 
Conference of Christians and Jews $25.00; Yenching University $25.00; 
Atlanta University $25.00; Athens College $25.00; Save the Children Fed- 



eration $25.00; Boston City Mission $15.00; Golden Rule Foundation 
$15.00; Pine Mountain Settlement School $10.00. 

Just before spring vacation a clothing drive was held and two big boxes 
of clothing and shoes were collected to be sent to Europe. 

As you know, Abbot sponsors the College Classique des Jeunes Filles, 
Cherbourg, France. Last year Mademoiselle Arosa, of the faculty, took 
supplies and food over to them on her trip to France. This seems the best plan 
since their needs can be bought in this country, but not in France. Many 
Abbot girls are corresponding with students at the college and many are 
sending packages of food to individual girls. There has been some talk of 
exchanging students, and, perhaps, one of these years that will come to pass. 

A.C.A. has given three vesper services this year: one in the fall on the 
World Student Service Fund; the Christmas service, and a hymn sing in 
February. Another service is scheduled for the end of the year. Last term 
A.C.A. held three morning chapels and we are going to give several more 
between now and the end of school. Both chapels and vespers given by A.C.A. 
are well-liked by all. 

There are very few things left this year for A.C.A. to do, but we have had 
a full and happy year. Innovations have been made, old practices discarded, 
but we feel that a lot of good has been accomplished, and we intend to con- 
tinue it during the summer by collecting enough money for C.A.R.E. pack- 
ages, to send several during the summer vacation. 



World Student Service Fund 

Barbara Turner, 1947, Secretary A.C.A. 

The World Student Service Fund is an international organization of 
students whose purpose is to promote international bonds of friendship and 
to aid one another in times of hardship. Today, the students on this continent 
are unique in that we are still in a position to help those who have been 
crippled as a result of the war. We consider it not only our duty but a priv- 
ilege and honor to help those in other lands who so heroically fought for the 
principles for which we also stand. 

Last year Abbot contributed almost $2,000 to this worthy organization. 
This was the largest sum donated by any secondary school in the country. 
The money was raised in a variety of ways; the principal source is a collection 
which is taken up three times a year and it amounts to approximately three- 
fifths of our total contribution. The girls are urged to make these donations a 
personal gift from their own allowances. The faculty also contributes sub- 
stantially. 

Since the shortage in domestic help started which every establishment 
faces, Abbot girls have done most of the dining-room work, such as setting 
the tables. Each girl is assigned a new duty each week. The most dreaded of 

8 



all these duties is "dawn patrol", or setting tables for breakfast, because ii 
requires an extra early start. Several girls volunteer to do this job and othei 
in return for a small fee which goes to the W.S.S.F. Others do sewing, such 
attaching name tapes and cleaning silver jewelry and ironing. The money 
which they earn in this way is also given to the fund. (Money thus earned has 
amounted to almost $200.) In addition to this, Abbot and Phillips presented 
last year an operetta, Iolanthe. Abbot's share in the profits went to the fund. 

Each year, early in May, Abbot has an annual birthday bazaar. This is 
one of the major events on the school calendar. It is an outdoor affair which 
is very gay and attractive with decorated booths around the Abbot Circle, 
all types of games, flowers, balloons and there is a tea room. There have been 
booths for each of several allied nations on which are sold war relief articles. 
There are raffles and a wishing well and other attractions that make the Ab- 
bot Circle resemble, in a large sense, a country fair. It is estimated that about 
six hundred people come. In all about $2,000 was taken in last year, and the 
profits which remained after all the expenses had been paid and money given 
to the relief societies for whom we had sold articles, amounted to five hundred 
dollars which were added to our donation to the World Student Service 
Fund. Another method used to raise the funds, one which we especially like 
because of its significance of denying ourselves something for the good of 
others, is a golden rule meal. This is a wholesome but economical meal of 
beans or some other inexpensive dish. The difference in cost between this 
meal and the kind of dinner we usually have is about $30. Several of these 
meals enable a fairly large sum to be added to our contribution. 

Abbot was proud to hold first place last year among the secondary schools 
in aiding this organization in its important work, and it hopes to be able to 
make as substantial a contribution again this year. 



Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe 

Christine von Goeben, 1947, Vice-President A.C. A. 

This year the school is helping to feed the starving in Europe in many 
ways. One of these ways is in sending C.A.R.E. food packages. These are put 
out by Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe, Inc. Each package 
costs ten dollars and weighs thirty pounds. The advantage of sending relief 
in this manner is that the food is already in Europe. Delivery is made right 
from the stockpiles, but, if the package cannot be delivered, the money is 
returned to the sender. 

To collect the money for these packages we have placed two boxes 
around the school in which people drop pennies, quarters and sometimes 
dollars. The corridors and day scholars are also collecting among themselves. 
So far, two packages have been sent, and we have nearly collected enough 
for another. 



Meals for Millions 

Carolyn McLean, 1947, Treasurer A. C. A. 

A means of helping Europe new to Abbot came this year: the Meals for 
Millions Foundation. The purpose of this fund is principally to supply Euro- 
pean children through large shipments of concentrated food, designed to 
meet the basic needs of its recipients. Donations from Abbot for this cause 
are not used to support the organization itself, but go directly to purchasing 
the food, each three cents given buying one meal for a child in an Austrian 
school. 

Instead of collecting specified amounts through corridor proctors or the 
Christian Association representatives, four jars have been put in places 
which we pass every day: one of the Draper stair landings, Homestead, 
Sherman and Abbey. So far Abbot has sent a little over twenty-six dollars 
to the Foundation. The positions of these jars are constant reminders of their 
purpose, and the remembrance that every few cents dropped into them pro- 
vide a complete meal has encouraged voluntary and more frequent indi- 
vidual giving at Abbot. 



Cum Laude 

Frances Flint 1942, cum laude, now in Radcliffe, spoke in Abbot Chapel, 
April 21, on "The Reward of Scholarship." Following her talk the names of 
the fourteen students receiving the award this year, were announced. 



Emily Gierasch 
Barbara Flues 
Jane Brown 
Corallie Hanly 
Sally Humason 
Margaret Kimball 
Mildred Kreis 



Elizabeth Ann Mitchell 
Jean Ritchey 
Susanne Robbins 
Carolyn Sackett 
Geraldine Treadway 
Christine von Goeben 
Marion White 



10 



Spring Term, 1947 



Friday, April ri, Meeting of the Board of Trustees at the School 

Saturday, April 12, College Board Examinations for Seniors. Concert by Miss 

Kate Friskin and Dorothy Minty, Violinist 
Sunday, April 12, Vespers, The Reverend Gardiner M. Day, D.D., Christ 

Church, Cambridge 
Saturday, April ig, Abbot Fidelio-Phillips Exeter Glee Club Concert at Exeter 
Sunday, April 20, Vespers, The Reverend Allan K. Chalmers, D.D., Broadway 

Tabernacle Church, New York 
Saturday, April 26, Tea Dance for Preps and Juniors 
Sunday, April 2J, Vespers, Abbot Christian Association 
Saturday, May 3, Abbot Birthday Bazaar 
Sunday, May 4, Vespers, Miss Friskin and the Choir 
Saturday, May 10, Third Open Forum 
Sunday, May 11, Organ Recital by Mr. Walter Howe 
Saturday, May iy, Cum Laude Lecture, Mrs. Wilma A. Kerby-Miller, Dean 

of Instruction, Radcliffe College 
Sunday, May 18, Vespers, The Reverend Sidney Lovett, D.D., Chaplain Yale 

University 
Saturday, May 24, Field Day. Speech Recital 
Sunday, May 25, Vespers, The Reverend A. Grant Noble, Chaplain, Williams 

College. 



Commencement Program 



SCHOOL RALLY 

Friday, May 30, 7.30 p.m. 

ALUMNAE DAY 

Saturday, May 31 

Alumnae Luncheon, 1. 00 p.m. 
Annual Meeting of the Alumnae 
Association, Abbot Hall, 2.45 p.m. 
Dinner with the school, Bailey Hall, 
6.30 p.m. 

DRAPER DRAMATICS 

The Tempest, Davis Hall, 8.00 p.m. 



BACCALAUREATE 

Sunday, June 1, 10.45 a - m -j South 
Church. Sermon by The Rev. Don- 
ald B. Aldrich, D.D., Dean-Elect of 
the Chapel, Princeton University. 

TREE AND IVY PLANTING, 5.30 
p.m. 

COMMENCEMENT CONCERT 

7.30 p.m. 

GRADUATION EXERCISES 

Monday, June 2, 10.00 a.m., South 
Church. Address by Dr. Lewis 
Perry, Headmaster Emeritus, Phillips 
Exeter Academy. 



11 




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Abbot Alumnae Association 

Reunions are friendly events, important every year, regardless of a five- 
year interval. Alumnae are most cordially invited to return to Abbot for 
Commencement, May 30 to June 2, and especially on May 31, Alumnae 
Day. Come, not only to renew your youth, but to receive the greater satis- 
faction of experiencing a mature appreciation of Abbot, and your Abbot 
friends. 

The Alumnae Luncheon will be a buffet lunch served in Bailey Hall, the 
beautiful school dining room. The annual meeting of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion will take place in Abbot Hall, and the Draper Dramatics, produced so 
successfully by Mrs. Bertha Morgan Gray for thirty years, will provide a 
delightful finish to the day. 

Please return your applications for rooms and meals, at once, to the 
Alumnae Office. 

Chairman of committee on luncheon arrangements, Mrs. Mildred Frost 
Eaton. 



A Memory 



Although I old and wrinkled be, 
Age cannot dim my memory. 
I well recall it, to this day: 
The rug was wine; the walls were gray; 
The little benches stood in line 
Like Christian soldiers marking time. 
And portraits hung in gilded frames 
Upon which could be read the names 
Of those who helped to pave the w r ay 
To make my school what 'tis today. 
Serene and hallowed was this room, 
Refreshment in the darkest gloom. 
Of me it's always been a part. 
It owns a corner of my heart. 

Alden Obering 1947 



13 



Class Reunion Chairmen 

1887 Harriet H. Thwing, 975 East Boulevard, Cleveland 8, Ohio 

1902 Mildred Mooers Poore (Mrs. Hezekiah), 37 Ames St., Lawrence, Mass. 

1907 Alice Webster Brush (Mrs. R. Warner), 1 108 Adams St., Dorchester 24, 
Mass. 

1 91 2 Barbara Moore Pease (Mrs. Maurice H.), Lincoln Lane, New Britain, 
Conn. 

191 7 Miriam Bacon Chellis (Mrs. Myron S.), 15 Raymond Ave., Beverly, 
Mass. 

1922 Janet Warren Winslow (Mrs. Gordon B.), 57 Pinewood Rd., Need- 
ham, Mass. 

1927 Sydna White, 391 Bleecker St., New York 14, New York 

1932 Elizabeth Boyce, 154 Main St., Andover, Mass. 

1937 Joan Todd Wilkinson (Mrs. Warren S.), Tinton Ave., Eatontown, N.J. 

1942 Jeanne Bowersox, 287 Willow St., New Haven, Conn. 

1946 Sally V. Allen, Briarcliff Junior College, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 

Abbot Circle Award 

The Abbot Circle, the Senior class yearbook, won in competitive criticism, 
the highest award given by the National Scholastic Press Association, that of 
All American Superior rating. This is the first time the book has received the 
top national rating, but on two other occasions, in 1939 and 1940, it received 
First Class rating. 

Ready! Abbot Playing Cards! 

Exceptionally attractive playing cards with Abbot view, blue and yellow 
backs. Perfect for gifts at any season. Priced at standard retail price. Order 
one pack, or a set, through the Alumnae Office. 

Centennial Plates! 

Not many left, so they are in the antique class. Order now if you wish to 
own one. 

Books from Miss Emily Means' 1 Library 

Last August Mr. Flagg, with Theodore and Bill to assist him, drove to 
Miss Means' Island at Christmas Cove, Maine. They brought back around 
500 books, from her personal library, a collection of French, German, Spanish 
and Italian books, as well as many on art subjects (of which the Abbot library 
has duplicates). These books have been carefully examined and appraised, 
and the school has found it can place 266 on the library shelves. The rest are 
worthless for present-day use. 



Abbot Clubs 






BOSTON (1892): President, Mrs. Martha Ransom Tucker '37; Vice- 
Presidents, Mrs. Mary Piper Sears '28, Helen S. Barss '43; Recording Secretary, 
Mrs. Dorothy Garry Warlick '40; Corresponding Secretary, Frances Flint '42; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Nay Gramkow '27; Auditor, Helen Stott '41; Pro- 
gram Chairman, Mrs. Gertrude Wind Schefft '40. Directors 1947-1949, Kather- 
ine Harris '39, Mrs. Doris Sawyer Hoar '40, Joan Webster '40. 

The annual meeting was held on April 12, at the College Club, Boston. 
After dessert-coffee refreshments and the social period, the election of new 
officers took place. The club voted a gift of $50. to the Abbot Scholarship 
Fund. A special tribute was paid to the memory of Enid Baush Patterson, 
Abbot 191 3, who died on February 25. From 1932- 1934 she was president 
of the Boston Club, and always kept a devoted interest in its welfare. Two 
poems written in appreciation of her life and friendship by Abbot friends, 
were read (see page 26). 

Mrs. Josephine Osgood gave a reading of a hilarious English Comedy. 

CHICAGO (1921): President, Mrs. Carolyn Cross Robbins '40; Secretary- 
Treasurer, Judith Hawkes '43. The club met for luncheon with Mrs. Chipman 
on March 20, at the Hotel Pearson. Nine alumnae from Chicago and suburbs 
were greatly interested to hear direct news from Andover, and decided to try 
to meet- once a year. 

Those present were: Margaret Hall Walker '08, Dorothy Gilbert Bellows 
'15, Mary Simpson Lind '25, Edith Bullen Creden '26, Donna Brace Kroeck 
'30, Alice Eckman Mason '30, Barbara Bellows '39, Carolyn Cross Robbins 
'40, Judith Hawkes '43. 

CONNECTICUT (1923): President, Mrs. Martha Tuttle Haigis '27; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Virginia Jones Garvan Jr. '38. 

The Connecticut Club held a delightful luncheon meeting at the Shuttle 
Meadow Club, New Britain, on April 18. Thirty-nine alumnae were present 
to hear the latest news from Abbot from Mrs. Chipman, and new officers 
were elected. Appreciation was expressed to Mrs. Barbara Moore Pease who 
acted as hostess, and who had made the arrangements. 

Those present were: Mabel Stone Griffin '94, Ethel Brooks Scott '01, 
Julia Rockwell Bancroft '01, Katherine King '02, Rena Porter Hastings '06, 
Gladys Dudley Stephan '07, Esther Parker Lovett '08, Marian Towle Sturgis 
'08, Katherine Raymond Andrews '08, Ruth Newcomb '10, Emily Silsby 
Morgan ' 1 o, Katherine Ordway Parker '11, Jessie Wightman Jones '11, Ruth 
Draper Hyde '12, Barbara Moore Pease '12, Dorothy Simpson Faith '12, 
Norma Allen Haine '15, Cornelia Newcomb Lattin '17, Ruth Allen Healy 
'18, Judy Sherman Tibbetts '18, Harriette Harrison '19, Muriel Moxley 
Hubbard '20, Louise Robinson '20, Katherine Damon Kletzien '22, Eleanor 

J 5 



Warren '23, Eleanor Bodwell Pepion '25, Carlotta Sloper '26, Emily House 
'27, Martha Tuttle Haigis '27, Emily Sloper '28, Dorothy Newcomb Rogers 
'29, Barbara Lord Mathias '31, Kathryn Ingram Rowe '31, Shirley Smith 
King '35, Barbara Waite Lincoln '36, Virginia Jones Garvan '38. 

DETROIT (1922): President, Mrs. Harriet Balfe Nalle '17. 

MAINE, EASTERN (1926): President, Mrs. Frances McDougall Mc- 
Loon '26; Vice-President, Mrs. Louise Douglas Hill '26; Secretary-Treasurer, 
Mrs. Annetta Richards Bryant '23. The annual meeting will be held this 
summer. 

MAINE, WESTERN (1898): President, Mrs. Louise Houghton Wells 
'06; Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude Shackleton Hacker '15; Treasurer, Gladys Merrill 

'i9- 

NEW YORK (1898): President, Mrs. Grace Leyser Boynton '19; Vice- 
Presidents, Mrs. Mary Jane Owsley Warwick '30, Mrs. Ruth Gann Baker '31; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. Mary Mallory Pattison '22; Corresponding Secretary, 
Mrs. Susanne Long Kremer '41 ; Treasurer, Mrs. Alice Van Schmus Smith '22. 
Directors, Mrs. Helen Bradley Hodgkinson '19, Gertrude Holbrook '25, Ann 
Oakman '39. 

The annual spring luncheon was held on April 19, at the Park Lane 
Hotel, New York. Miss Alice Sweeney, Acting Principal of Abbot, was the 
guest of honor. Sydna White '27, presented her filmstrip "How to Conquer 
War," which has been shown all over this country and in many foreign 
countries. 

The retiring board of the club has held frequent meetings, and early this 
spring gave a delightful tea at the Junior League for alumnae in the city. 

Great appreciation was expressed to Gertrude Holbrook, retiring presi- 
dent, for her untiring efforts to promote successful club meetings, and for the 
many personal notes she has written, and telephone calls made, to bring 
alumnae out to meetings. The Board appointed class representatives to take 
the responsibility of inviting classmates in the New York area to attend meet- 
ings and to sit at special class tables. 

The successful result was evident in the attendance of fifty-three alumnae, 
many of whom were present for the first time at an Abbot gathering. 

Before the luncheon "Fair Alma Mater" was sung, and grace said by 
Mary Carter Righter '89. The beautiful centerpiece was composed of spring 
flowers brought by Nini Owsley Warwick from her garden, and place cards 
were designed by Gertrude Holbrook, whose clever, original cards have 
decorated the tables at many luncheons. 

It was voted to have a tea and cocktail party on Friday, December 5, 
instead of the usual luncheon, and to include husbands in the invitations. 
The annual spring luncheon will be held in April, 1948. 

16 



Those present were: Mary Carter Righter '89, Anna Johnston '90, Helen 
Stiles Hutchinson '93, Carolyn MacConnell Chapin '94, Catherine Sandford 
'99, Mabel Tubman Taylor '00, Constance Parker Chipman '06, Alice 
Sweeney '14, Elizabeth Brigham Roth '15, Helen Wygant Smith '19, Grace 
Leyser Boynton '19, Marea Blackford Fowler '19, Eunice Meigs Pease '21, 
Jane Baldwin '22, Elizabeth Hutchsinson Graham '22, Mary Mallory Patti- 
son '22, Alice Van Schmus Smith '22, Helga Lundin Buttrick '23, Mary 
Elizabeth Rudd '23, Maude King Bonner '24, Margaret McKee De Yoe '24, 
Ethel Thompson James '24, Laura Scudder Williamson '24, Theodate John- 
son '25, Gertrude Holbrook '25, Frances Howard O'Brien '25, Catherine 
Blunt Pierson '25, Elizabeth Ward Saunders '25, Elizabeth Righter Farrar 
'25, Sydna White '27, Betty Jane Osborne Bacon '29, Gertrude Campion 
Soutar '29, Roberta Kendall Kennedy '29, Katherine Kennedy Beardsley 
'29, Ruth Whitehill Wygant '29, Nini Owsley Warwick '30, Alice Canoune 
Coates '30, Doris Seiler '30, Harriet Gregory Morris '31, Marcia Rudd Keil 
'31, Ruth Cann Baker '31, Marie Whitehill '31, Katharine Brigham '32, 
Betty Weaver Van Wart '33, Barbara Worth Brown '33, Lillian Seiler '37, 
Sally Sutor Parsons '38, Marie Appleby Severance '38, Marion Altreuter 
Brightman '38, Lloyd Pierce Smith '39, Margit Hintz Lorenze '39, Ann Oak- 
man '39, Sue Long Kremer '41, Margery Martin Martin '41, Ruth Rathbone 
Hildreth '42. 

OHIO CENTRAL (1921): President, Mrs. Bettina Rollins Wheeler '39; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Margaret Graham Greenleaf '28. 

The club held a luncheon meeting on March 15, at the University Club, 
Columbus. Mrs. Chipman brought the most recent Abbot news, to a group 
from Newark and Columbus. 

Those present were: Alice Fleek Miller '91, Kate Winegarner Spencer 
'91, Louise Norpell Meek '09, Thelma Mazey Gager '19, Virginia Miller 
Smucker '20, Margaret Graham Greenleaf '28, Bettina Rollins Wheeler '29, 
Frances Flory Jones '30. 

OHIO CLEVELAND (1927) : President, Mrs. Madeleine Fiske Worthing- 
ton '13. 

OLD COLONY CLUB (1924): President, Mrs. Ruth Murray Moore 
'10; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Martha Wind Finger '33. The annual meeting 
will be held in October. 

PITTSBURGH (1921): President, Mrs. Gertrude Miller Jackson '95; 
Secretary, Mrs. Eliza Atwell Browne '87. A meeting is planned for this spring. 

MANSFIELD, OHIO, has no organized club, but the following group 
of alumnae met with Mrs. Chipman at luncheon on March 17, and later 
introduced her to some delightful mothers with thirteen-year-old daughters: 
Eleanor Black Draffan '16, Mary Baxter Wright '17, Peg Black Manz '33, 
Dorothy Dann '16, Helen Keating Ott '24, Ann Loughridge '43. 

I? 



In Memoriam 



1887 

Anna Bronson, widow of Dr. William W. 
Root, died on February 15, in Ithaca, N. Y. 
She is survived by three daughters, a son, 
six grandsons, and seven granddaughters. 
Her daughter, Mrs. G. Meredith Brill, has 
sent a gift to the Abbot Second Century 
Alumnae Fund, in her memory. 

1889 

Annie Dutton, widow of Alfred H. Colby, 
died on April 7. 

1891 

M. Louise Storrs, wife of George P. Cowan, 
died early in 1947. 

1900 

Lucy Hamilton, wife of Allan F. Ayers, 
died on March 7, in Akron, Ohio, after a 
long illness. "Through her illness she was the 
embodiment of courage and cheerfulness, 
truly a gallant spirit." She is survived by her 
husband, a son, Allan Jr., and daughter, 
Mrs. John V. Hower (Mary Ayers 1927), 
and five grandchildren. 



1908 

Ruth Tucker died in November, 1945, at 
Little Rock, Arkansas. After leaving Abbot 
she attended the Wheelock School in Boston, 
and later taught at the Springdale Country 
Day School in Germantown, Pa. Later she 
studied at Columbia University. She was on 
the staff of the Arkansas Gazette for a number 
of years, being editor of its Woman's Page. 

1913 

Enid Baush, wife of Ralph M. Patterson, 
died suddenly on February 25, in Newton 
Highlands. She is survived by her husband, 
two daughters and a son. 

From 1932 to 1934 she was president of the 
Boston Abbot Club; and in 1937 she was 
chairman of the then Abbot Alumnae In- 
come Fund. 

1920 

Susan Dodge, wife of Paul O. Glover, died 
on November 8, 1946, after a long illness. 
She is survived by her husband and two 
daughters, Natalie and Susanne. 



Class News 



1874-1890 

Class Funds Secretary: Mrs. Ernest C. 
Young (Ruth Childs), 6 Emerson St., Brook- 
line. 

1878 

Charlotte Blodget Richards reports the 
arrival of her seventh great-grandchild. In 
February she celebrated her 90th birthday. 

1887 

Sixtieth Reunion 

Greetings to our friends at Abbot: 

In 1942, when four members of the Class 
of '87 were at Abbot for our 55th anniver- 
sary, a member of the graduating class asked 
"Did '87 plant the Old Oak?" We do not 
claim that honor but we do remember that 
60 years ago there were 500 guests who 
gathered on the lawn around the Old Oak to 
greet the Alumnae Association and to con- 
gratulate the 17 girls who would graduate 
the next day. An old newspaper clipping 



names it, "A novel and most pleasant feature 
of the anniversary," and that the moving of 
Smith Hall and the prospect for new build- 
ings furnished topics for conversation. So, 
although we did not plant, perhaps we did 
help to start class gatherings around the old 
tree! 

As class secretary I may be expected to 
give a few facts. The Class of '87 was organ- 
ized in the fall of 1885 and a Constitution 
adopted. Early in 1886 Alice Hamlin was 
elected President, Jeanie Carter Vice- 
President, and Mollie Ball Secretary and 
Treasurer. Mollie resigned in 1907 and 
Harriet Thwing took the office. After the 
death of Alice Hamlin Hinman in 1934 the 
office of President was added to that of Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. Jeanie Carter Prall may 
not know that she is still carried in our 
Record Book as Vice-President. 

The day following graduation we voted to 
have a yearly class letter. Only once has the 
package been lost. Really seventeen auto- 



18 



biographies. Ten of the girls have written of 
their homes, children and grandchildren and 
great-grandchildren. The others report as 
teachers, artist, Curator in a College Art 
Gallery, Librarian, foreign missionary, and 
Assistant Secretary of Alpha Omega Alpha. 
We think we write good letters! 

For 33 years we could still say, "We are 
seventeen." We had numerous reunions but 
a few are outstanding. Our 42nd anniversary 
came at the time of the Abbot Centennial. 
Nine classmates, three husbands and two 
daughters helped to celebrate that glorious 
event. When we became the "Fifty Year 
Class" we had twelve members living and 
nine came to the reunion. For our 55th anni- 
versary four members represented the nine 
who were living. We greatly enjoyed the new 
dormitory and the additions and changes to 
the old buildings and the Means Memorial 
Library. 

I am also class treasurer and know that 
we have carried out our class motto, "Als ich 
kann". At graduation we gave generously 
to the Draper Hall building fund and fur- 
nished a student's room. (Who has the '87 
room now?) 

For this building fund we helped to start 
that letter that later became a nuisance — 
give a quarter and write four letters and so, 
on and on. But it brought in several hundred 
dollars. We were 100 per cent givers to the 
Loyalty Endowment Fund of the Centennial 
year. We rejoiced with our Emma Twitchell 
Sturgis that it was her sister Alice Twitchell 
'86, who was the Director of the enterprise 
and with the help of alumnae and friends 
could "pass over to Mr. Flagg the gift of 
Si 60,000". We gave to a Lectureship Fund; 
to the Memorial Gateway for Miss Merrill, 
to the foreign missionary work that our Jean 
Jillson was doing — and every time we were 
asked for money. But our crowning gift was 
the furnishing of the Reading Room in the 
Means Memorial Library. Our Fiftieth An- 
niversary Gift and the amount we gave the 
Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund made 
this gift possible. We like the room and are 
happy that we can have a large part in the 
daily life of the students. 

And now we are coming to our 60th mile- 
stone. During the past five years three of our 
faithful members have died. We are now six 
"girls", older grown but in some ways not 
very much changed. We are staying at home 
and having a "paper reunion" by writing six 



letters to you. Also we are sending a 60th 
Reunion Gift to the Abbot Second Century 
Alumnae Fund. "Als ich kann". 

With best wishes to the Class of '47 and 
congratulations to all students who have 
spent part of their school days at Abbot in 
Andover. 

Sincerely yours, 

Harriet H. Thwing 
President, Secretary-Treasurer A. A. '87 
975 East Blvd., Cleveland 8, Ohio 

Class Reunion Chairman 



Greetings to Abbot: 

Sixty years is a long time but not so long 
looking back as looking ahead! There is 
something about Abbot and Andover that 
keeps one young. In our class letters we are 
still "girls." And thanks to our fine secretary, 
Harriet Thwing, we have kept up those 
letters all these years, and our interest in 
Abbot is still warm. 

We have the added interest in each other, 
families, through children, grandchildren 
and now great-grandchildren, and our in- 
terest in these younger generations also 
keeps us young. 

Looking back we think of long walks, 
tennis, ball games — while now for several of 
us walking is limited — three of us with a 
broken hip and Eliza Atwell with a back 
which has caused her much suffering owing 
to a fall many years ago. 

For three years now I have stumped 
around most awkwardly on crutches, and 
am seldom able to get out, but owing to my 
daughter Marion's business there is no lack 
of interest or occupation in our daily lives. 
She and two assistants have in our home a 
nursery school of 32 children from two and 
a half years to five years of age, and there is 
not a dull moment from nine a.m., to noon. 
Imagine putting on thirty snow suits, thirty 
pair of galoshes, mittens and caps! Their 
interests and occupations are certainly varied 
and one never knows what is going on in 
those busy little minds. 

With my crutches I am an unfailing source 
of interest. "Why do you use those sticks? 
Can you get on them yourself? What did you 
do to your hind leg?" 

Letters from grandsons in the air and 
medical corps in China and Panama have 
kept us in close touch with world affairs. 



!9 



We are sorry not to have a successful re- 
union like '86, but circumstances prevent 
that, so we can only send loving remem- 
brance to Abbot. 

Jeanie Carter Prall '87 
314 Cornelia St. 
Boonton, N.J. 



Dear Mother Abbot: Sixty years ago this 
June, we, the Class of '87, stood facing our 
schoolmates, relatives and friends in Old 
South Church, and confidently sang "Father, 
I know that all my life is portioned out to 
me. The changes that are sure to come, I do 
not fear to see." 

We were seventeen in number then; now 
we are only six. The changes have come, 
losses, sickness, accidents and usual vicissi- 
tudes of life. Among our class songs, was a 
simple little ditty that went like this: "Days 
at old Abbot will quickly fly by; And when 
they are gone, I fear we shall cry." I assure 
you that we have not cried. I can speak with 
authority, when I say for my classmates, 
that all these trials have been met with high 
courage and Christian fortitude. I know 
because we have kept in close touch all these 
years, with a "Round Robin" letter. I have 
the budget now and am about to send it on 
its way for probably more than the sixtieth 
time. 

One of my classmates has suggested that 
I tell you about an amusing experience I 
had, during my first days at Abbot. I was 
rather a homesick girl that first week end. 
One of the old girls, taking pity on my lone- 
liness, came to me and asked, "Will you give 
me a quarter, Sunday?" Somewhat sur- 
prised, I replied, "Why, yes, I can give you 
one now." She laughed, and then explained 
to me the Sunday program of those days — 
Breakfast one half hour later than week days; 
silent half-hour, when each girl had her 
room quite to herself; church, and the com- 
ing together with a teacher to give a report 
of the sermon, then dinner, and the after- 
noon in our rooms for writing our home 
letters. From 4-5 p.m. came the "Quarters"; 
girls were permitted to spend the time visit- 
ing with each other, either in their rooms, or 
walking in the Grove, a quarter of an hour 
with each girl. Thence came the familiar 
question, "Will you give me a quarter, Sun- 
day?" I do not know if the custom still per- 
sists, or if not, when it was discontinued. 



As for myself, during all these years, my 
life has been uneventful, no great deeds to 
report, nothing of wide interest; just kept 
busy living. My husband has been gone from 
earth for more than twenty years, but chil- 
dren have been loyal and true. Three years 
ago I suffered a broken hip, but even that 
has had its compensations, so on the whole 
I can truly say with the Psalmist, "The lines 
are fallen unto me in pleasant places." 

I do not expect to come back to greet you, 
this June, "Dear Alma Mater"; I am not 
sure that I want to come, for I think that I 
should wander "Lonely as a cloud", amid 
the scenes of by-gone days. Memories cannot 
but have a touch of sadness, remembering 
and missing those who have gone from us; 
wondering who will be next, and when my 
own turn will come. I can only keep repeat- 
ing the words of S. D. Ryman, 

"Let me be brave, or failing that, 
Bravely pretend that I am so. 
There are full many terrors here, 
Such things as break the strong, I know. 

"But let me walk as without fear, 
Hold fast to all the Good I see; 
For there are some, who in my train, 
Will stand or fall along with me." 

With enduring affection for "Abbot" 
and gratitude for its influence upon my life, 
Your devoted daughter, 

Angie Dunton Purrington '87 
1 1 76 Broad St. 
Bloomfield, N. J. 

Greetings to Abbot and to the Class of '87 : 

Although we grieve for the recent loss of 
three classmates who were always faithful in 
attending our reunions, six of our original 
members still carry on the yearly class letter 
and maintain warm interest in each other 
and Abbot. Frailties of age coupled with 
distance, — for we are dispersed across the 
continent from Massachusetts to California, 
— may prevent a meeting for our sixtieth 
anniversary, but we shall send a gift to Abbot 
on her Alumnae Day and have planned to 
exchange messages through the Bulletin. 

Accordingly I report for myself that while 
physical limitations constrain me to read and 
write much less than I wish and to spend 
more time in bed than is desirable, I still 
enjoy three main interests: church, garden 



20 






and clubs. For sixty years I have been a 
member of Query Club and act as its alter- 
nate leader. Of the Woman's Club, I am a 
charter member and am scheduled to give a 
reminiscent talk of its early days for the semi- 
centennial meeting in April. The garden 
gives me both delight and relaxation, for I 
merely supervise the work — the lovely 
flowers and fresh vegetables are the fruit of 
other people's labor. Much of my attention 
is given to the Sewickley Presbyterian 
Church where I have had the pleasure of 
carrying out some long-cherished plans. A 
small volume I am presenting to the Abbot 
Library explains just what these plans have 
been. During the past two years three me- 
morials of my own designing were placed in 
the church building. First, a stained glass 
"Praise Window", whose theme is centered 
on the Long Metre Doxology, was dedicated 
in a special service as a family memorial. 
Then a carved oak tablet bearing a roster of 
the church's ministers was installed in mem- 
ory of my father. And finally the little 
"Book of Memorials" which describes and 
illustrates all the memorials in the church, 
including the window and the roster, was 
published in remembrance of my husband. 
It has been a great satisfaction to see these 
three brain-children take visible shape. 
Another task now on hand is preparing for 
publication the records of the church cen- 
tennial celebration which took place in 1938. 
Papers concerning it, that were mislaid after 
the death of the chairman directing the oc- 
casion, recently came to light and were sent 
to me as chairman of the historical commit- 
tee. It is slow work picking up dropped 
stitches, but I hope this volume of church 
history will be finished eventually. I really 
seem to be in the memorial business, for next 
week, as sole survivor of the Browne family, 
I am to present to the University of Pitts- 
burgh a room in the Cathedral of Learning 
which was planned by my sister-in-law in 
memory of her parents, but unfortunately 
was not finished until after her death. This 
beautiful room is a "museum piece," in- 
tended to typify a Pittsburgh home of the 
early part of the century. Its furnishings, 
derived entirely from the Browne home- 
stead, include the handsome cases contain- 
ing my brother-in-law's collection of fine 
books and so many familiar articles that one 
feels transported into the very atmosphere of 
the old home. This memorial is most ap- 



propriately placed, since the Cathedral is 
built on the former Browne property and the 
room, overlooking a magnificent view of the 
city from the 33rd floor, is almost directly 
above the site of the original Browne house. 
The presentation will take place at a simple 
dedication service on Sister Anna's birthday, 
when only a small group of relatives and old 
friends will join the University officials, but I 
view the occasion with a bit of alarm as a 
totally new sort of experience. My life in 
general moves along a quiet course among 
books and flowers and friends, but now and 
then it marks a red letter day on the calen- 
dar. And the coloring would be exception- 
ally brilliant if perchance I could attend 
Anniversary Day at Abbot and express my 
greetings and good wishes in person. 

Eliza Atwell Browne '87 

529 Pine Rd. 

Sewickley, Pa. 

To Abbot and her girls, far and near, 
Greetings from one of the girls of '87. We are 
not old, we have just lived through various 
experiences, and though it may be that our 
60th reunion should be this June, yet it 
seems only yesterday that our diplomas were 
given us in the Old South Church and our 
thoughts are just as loving as ever for the 
happy days we spent in school and the friends 
we had there and the friendships that have 
lasted are as strong as ever, today. Our 
gratitude to dear old Abbot is very deep, for 
we owe her much that has made us what we 
are. 

We may not be able to come back this year 
to tell her of our love and loyalty, but we 
send to her and to those who were girls with 
us and to all her girls our warmest greetings. 

May Abbot grow in strength and influ- 
ence, year by year, and may we, her daugh- 
ters, be an honor to her, wherever we may be. 

Jean Jillson '87 
536 West 6th St. 
Claremont, Cal. 

Sixty years since I left my dear old Abbot, 
who ever would believe it! 

Sizzling and fretting a bit but by the grace 
of my blessed Saviour I'm a happy old thing 
(in spite of the appalling world conditions) 
just waiting for the coming of my Lord and 
King. 

"Trust in the Lord with all thy heart, 
and lean not unto thine own understand- 



21 




CN 

CO 



< 
< 

O 

PQ 
PQ 
< 



ing." Are sermons in order in the class letters 

for the Bullet in? ! ! 

Sophia Walker Piper '87 
38 South Bow St. 
Milford, Mass. 

1891 

Judge Frederic M. Black, husband of 
Alice Hinkley, died suddenly on March 27, 
in Newark, Ohio. 

1892 

Fifty-fifth Reunion 

Calling all people who left Abbot with 
Miss McKeen in 1892: Come if you possibly 
can to celebrate this anniversary on May 3 1 , 
by skooter, helicopter or rocket, according 
to the distance. If you can't manage it, send 
your RSVP to the Alumnae Office and be 
sure to tune in to Station AAAA to hear all 
the goings-on. 

Jane B. Carpenter '92 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Jane B. Car- 
penter, 32 Shepard St., Apt. 22, Cambridge. 

Murtie Woodman Lane writes: "I began 
my serious study of piano with Prof. Downs 
at Abbot, 1892-1893, and have continued to 
study ever since. Played at the Pianists Club 
here in Fond du Lac in December, and ex- 
pect to play again in April. I'm living with 
my daughter, son-in-law and grandchild." 

1893 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Harry R. 
Miles (Anna Nettleton), 4 Rock Ledge Drive, 
Stamford, Conn. 

1894 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Doremus 
Scudder (Mabel Bosher), 133 West Ninth 
St., Claremont, Calif. 

1896 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Henry V. 
Conant (Ruth Loring), 914 High St., Ded- 
ham. 

1897 
Fiftieth Anniversary 

1898 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert W. 
Dunbar (Selina Cook), 3 Elk St., Apt. 7, 
Albany, N. Y. 



1900 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur P. 
Spear ''Grace Chapman^, 156 Winchester 
St., Brookline. 

Winona Algie is retiring this June from her 
position as Headmistress of The Charles 
River School, in Dover, Mass. Through her 
many years as head of the school it has be- 
come an outstanding school for children of 
preparatory years. 

Helen Abbott is recovering from a long 
and serious illness. She hopes to be at her 
home in Rockport this summer. 

Emma Bixby Place has spent the winter at 
Zephyrhills, Fla. 

Alice Wood Hodgdon has been on a motor 
trip to Mexico with Alice Titcomb Burke '99, 
and her family. 

1901 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Helen Hale, 
86 Knox St., Lawrence. 

Clara Thomson Knox held a very successful 
exhibition of paintings in the New Art Club 
gallery at Quincy, Illinois, in January. 

Keep the Alumnae Office informed of 
changes in address. 



1902 

Forty-fifth Reunion 

1947. Spring. Graduation, Alumnae Fund, 
Reunion ! 

Let's pause for a moment to think back 
and try to recapture a little of the Class of 
'02 spirit, a spirit fostered by the companion- 
ship of young girls thrown together, fortu- 
nate enough to enjoy one of the finest expe- 
riences life has to offer, that of a liberal educa- 
tion. Maybe if we came back to Reunion we 
might get a little of that old feeling again. 
So let's see if we can't be at Abbot on Alum- 
nae Day, May 3 1 . 

Mildred Mooers Poore 
37 Ames St. 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Reunion Chairman and 
Class Fund Secretary 

Mildred Mooers Poore's son, Dr. George C. 
Poore, was married February 8 to Mary 
Elizabeth Adney, in Philadelphia. She has a 
new grandson, born to her oldest son, Charles, 
whose family now consists of two boys and a 
girl. 



23 



1904 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. William O. 
Pettit (Elizabeth Winsor), 186 Livingston 
Ave., Brunswick. N.J. 

Helen Childs Baldwin sends the following 
family news. "I have a new grandson, born 
January 29. Nicholas Burpo. His mother, my 
daughter Betty, is now living in Amherst. 
with her two other children. Alden and 
Kathryn Louise. Her husband is Professor of 
Physics at Mass. State College. My daughter 
Ruth is again teaching Math, at the Shipley 
School in Bryn Mawr. The first of May my 
son Frederic will head up the Remington- 
Rand Tabulating Machines, as maintenance 
man at National Life Insurance Co. at Mont- 
pelier, Vt. I am still in Scouting, but lately 
have gone on the Y.W-.C.A. Board." 

1906 

Persis Mackintire Carr is successfully carry- 
ing on her husband's decorating business. 
Her son Winthrop, has resigned from the 
Navy, and with his family is living tempo- 
rarily with Persis. 

Rena Porter Hastings' son Lawrence has a 
second child, a daughter, Caroline Wheeler, 
born April 6. 

1907 

Fortieth Reunion 

, All seems to be going well for members of 
1907. So far, we have word from nine; five 
acceptances and four regrets. We are glad the 
regrets were necessary because of being bus- 
ily engaged, and not from illness. We hope 
to have a full report from every one of you 
for our reunion. 

Alice Webster Brush 

1 108 Adams St. 

Dorchester 24, Mass. 

Reunion Chairman 

Marjory Bond Crowley has a second grand- 
son, Joel Bond Crowley, born November 29, 
1946. 

Margaret Hall Walker has a married son 
and small grandchild, Christine, born 
August 15, 1946, living in Miami. She re- 
grets being unable to attend reunion. 

Laura Howell is still with the State Dept. 
of Institutions and Agencies in Trenton, 
N. J., where she has been for twenty years. 
Her work is in an advisory capacity, relating 
to the care and problems of older people. 

Clara Hukill Leeds reports a very busy 



year. "My year has been spent Hying back 
and forth to Florida, where I decorated a 
hotel, furnished twelve cottages and two big 
houses, also a very gay bath house Casino. 
My family came down and we settled in 
Naples for two months of superb weather. 
Please give my love to everybody." 

Ri Pillsbury Hawkes hopes "nothing will 
prevent my being with you all on May 31 
and June 1 . My son. H. Scott Taylor, has 
been appointed Supt. of the State Park at 
Thermopolis, Wyoming, and takes over his 
duties April 1 . His wife will run their business 
which is "The Star Plunge" also situated in 
the Park. My daughter, Rosamond Taylor 
Jensen '35, lives in Hampden. Mass. She has 
two sons. I continue to sell contents of 
houses, estates or otherwise." 

Mabel Rhodes Manter's daughter, Mabel 
Jr.. has a second daughter, Nancy Falls 
Jones. 

Anna May Richards Folsom is hoping to get 
back for reunion. Her fourth grandchild is 
"ten days old. Sanford Stoddard." Her third, 
Carolyn Saunders, was born on January 15. 

Louise Richards Rollins' fourth daughter, 
Sydney, is to be married on May 3 1 . 

1908 

Esther Parker Lovett has joined the grand- 
mother ranks with the birth of a daughter, 
Eugenia, to her daughter, Eugenia Lovett 
West, April 19. 

1909 

Edith Gardner Merriam has been teaching 
violin and piano to children the past winter 
in Dennysville, Maine, where she has been 
living with her mother and brother, except 
for a few months of work at the Bangor Chil- 
dren's Home, since breaking up her home in 
Worcester after her husband's death in 1944. 
Her son George, who was in the service in 
Italy, is studying for a master's degree in 
history at Brown University. 

1910 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Myron G. 
Darby (Ethel Reigeluth), no Tanglewylde 
Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

1911 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Douglas Don- 
ald (Edith Johnson), 8 Carisbrooke St., An- 
dover. 



24 







EDITORIAL BOARD, GLASS BOOK 1907 
Seated: Alice Webster, Maria Pillsbury, Leonora Parsons, Harriet Seaton 
Standing: Edith Gutterson, Mabel Rhodes, Laura Howell 



1912 
Thirty-fifth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman: Barbara Moore Pease, 
Lincoln Lane, New Britain, Conn. 

Florence Bliss Ferguson writes, "My son is 
married and lives in Grand Rapids, Mich. 
I keep busy working for Red Cross and War 
Chest, and taking care of a large house with 
no servant. Time marches on so fast that I 
can't believe it is our 35th reunion, and it 
makes me feel very ancient. I can't go back 
to Andover, as we plan a trip to Grand 
Rapids in June." 

Avis Tobey Johnson writes, "Since Abbot 
I have had a full life taking care of a family 
of five. I lost my oldest son seven years ago. 
My two oldest daughters are married, and I 



have six grandchildren. My other daughter 
does secretarial work in Brockton, and 
Stuart is a freshman in high school, hoping 
to go to West Point sometime. I have been in 
a number of clubs, helping civic projects. I do 
wish I could come to Abbot." 

Barbara Moore Pease's son, Maurice H. 
Pease, Jr., was married to Dorothea Stork, 
March 26. 



1913 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Margaret 
Wilkins, 279 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, 
Calif. 

Marion Parshley's mother, Mrs. Emma 
Louise Parshley, died on March 21. 



IN MEMORIAM 

ENID BAUSH PATTERSON, '13 

Hers was a life that went its quiet way; 

No banners flung on high, her victories flaunted, 

But with a quip she won or lost the day 

And win or lose, herself remained undaunted. 

Her friends and loved ones were her firmament 
For whom her heart in service found release, 
And there was none who needed her but went 
Companioned by her courage and her peace. 

Helen Danforth Prudden 191 3 

ENID 

God smiled one day — that was Enid. 

Now — in the depths of my heart 

Dry-twisted by stabbing pain 

God smiles once more 

"She has been born again." 

Stalwart, brave, and free her life — 

She gave in love, in work — in play and duty. 

Her friendship was a sacred trust 

That brooked no weakness. 

Deep-buried in the earth 

Yet one with the living sun 

No meager life she lived, 

Knowing the buoyance of whitest fleeting clouds, 

The mystical quiet of the moon, 

The steadfastness of the stars, 

She sought always God's verities! 

She lives again! 

Her heart — forever flowing 

As a brook in Spring! 

HlLDEGARDE GuTTERSON SMITH I914 



26 



1914 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Elsie G. Sloan 
(Elsie Gleason), 67 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. 

Margaret Wylie Ware writes, "After Mar- 
garet Blake's death I didn't write to Abbot at 
all. Then when the war came and my son 
served and I saw letters in the Bulletin 
about other Abbot girls' sons, I wanted to 
add my bit. Well, my son Jack re-enlisted in 
the Army Air Corps. He is in Tucson, Ariz. 
Am keeping house for my 87-year-old moth- 
er. One has to have a hobby and so five years 
ago I started doing some oil crayon work, 
landscapes. My pictures are not large — about 
12 by 14 inches, but they have a "glow" 
about them that has attracted the attention 
of art critics in town, and I was admitted as 
an exhibiting member at the local art center 
here in town . . . Hello to every dear girl 
of 1914." 

From Harriet Bcwman Meeker we hear, 
"My son returned safely from 18 months in 
New Guinea, the Philippines and Japan and 
is now back at Purdue University. My 
daughter is to be married in May. My hus- 
band has been elected president of the com- 
pany with which he has been associated ever 
since he graduated from Purdue in 1 9 1 3, the 
J. D. Adams Co. They make road machinery 
and naturally we are very 'road conscious' at 
our house." 



1915 

From Muriel Baker Wood we hear of her 
important work in Germany. "I'll tell you a 
little of how I am putting in the occupation. 
I am working in the Adult Education Sec- 
tion, Education and Religious Affairs, Office 
of the Military Government in Berlin. Two 
of us in this headquarters have charge of the 
60-odd Adult Education Schools scattered 
throughout the American Zone, and of about 
the same number of miscellaneous organiza- 
tions, to say nothing of literally thousands of 
public libraries. To say that we are under- 
staffed is an understatement. 

"In our free time we put in hours at the 
Youth Centers where young Germany con- 
gregates to get warm and get something to 
eat, to play and to learn. A new club this 
week has seven hundred members enrolled in 
two days. I have my own little project too, 
with the German war wounded at the Ger- 
man hospital. Today I made plans to start a 



course in English for crippled German pa- 
tients. 

"The Negro tenor arrived looking blue- 
black in his snappy WD uniform. He sang 
and sang, 'Deep River', 'I've Got Shoes', 
'Swanee River', 'Old Black Joe'. Their 
faces were serious but intent. Then came a 
few halting questions. What did he think of 
German music? He spoke of his struggle to 
get an education at N.Y.U., working days, 
studying nights. He spoke with pride of his 
five years in the Navy with 'The Admiral'. 
He promised to come again — a gracious and 
talented guest, and the first contact these 
Germans have made with what they call the 
'Negro problem'. They are most curious to 
see how the minorities in other countries are 
treated. 

"There has been a lot of suffering this 
winter. The shortages affect all, regardless of 
nationality or political affiliation. The Amer- 
icans too, have been short on heat, light, 
practically everything. 

"My greetings to any members of the 
class who remember me." 

Address: ERA Branch, I A & C Division 
OMGUS, APO 742, % PM, New York, 
N. Y. 

1916 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. James E. 
Downs (Laura Cheever), Bancroft Rd., 
Andover, Mass. 



1917 

Thirtieth Reunion 

Girls of 191 7. We are looking forward to 
seeing you the last of May for our 30th 
reunion. Our children are grown up and 
there is plenty of gas this year, so come and 
make it the best reunion yet. fie sure to bring 
or send in all the news you can gather. See 
you soon. 

Miriam Bacon Chellis 
15 Raymond Ave. 
Beverly, Mass. 
Reunion Chairman 

Esther Davis Smith's son, David Burr 
Smith, was married to Nancy Gray Overton, 
on April 19. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Oliver D. 
Westcott (Dorothy Small), 84 Main St., 
Nantucket, Mass. 



27 



1918 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George J. 
Cutler (Velma Rowell), 45 Eliot St., Ja- 
maica Plain. 

1919 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Grace L. 
Boynton (Grace Leyser), 30 Engle St., 
Tenafly,N.J. 

Grace Boynton has just been elected presi- 
dent of the New York Abbot Club. 

Margaret Taylor Stainton's husband, 
Robert Stainton, is teaching at Case School 
in Cleveland, where he is Professor of Me- 
chanical Engineering. Her son Bob is attend- 
ing the Putney School in Vermont. 

1920 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Beverly Hub- 
bard (Muriel Moxley), 172 Putnam Ave., 
Hamden, Conn. 

Helen Thiel Gravengaard's husband, H. 
Peter Gravengaard, has been elected Vice- 
President of the National Underwriter Com- 



pany. 



1921 



Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. David H. 
Bigelow (Marion Kimball), 326 Highland 
St., West Newton. 

1922 

Twenty-fifth Reunion 

v Reunion Chairman: Janet Warren Wins- 
low, 57 Pinewood Rd., Needham, Mass. 

Jane Baldwin plans to be present at re- 
union. For seventeen years she has been with 
the Irving Trust Co., first in the investment 
department, and now in Estates and Trusts. 
She is enjoying it immensely. Betty Brewster 
Thompson will not be able to come. Her 
husband, Princeton '24, has an office in 
Derby, Conn., is busy with civil engineering 
and land surveying. Her daughter, Marver- 
elle, will be sixteen this summer, is a sopho- 
more at the Day School in New Haven. 
They live with Betty's father and mother. 
She says, "Remember me to 1922 most cor- 
dially and have a grand time when you get 
together." 

Catherine Damon Mason will be present. 
She has three children, Joan 2 1 , doing medi- 
cal research work; Anne 20, secretary; Bill 
12, at school. She's doing household chores 
* 'of which there is no end; spending one day 
a week at Gray Lady work at Camp Kilmer 
hospital." 



Kay Damon Kletzien is hopeful of return- 
ing. She has four lovely children, Edith 15, 
Phyllis 13, and two boys, Damon and Ralph. 
Her husband, Seymour, was overseas for 
some time and now is working in Hartford, 
and trying to find a place for the family to 
live. 

Mildred Burford Dildy writes, "I'm sure 
sorry not to be able to be back for reunion. I 
would love to see all of you. In '48 we plan 
to come East for our son Jerry's graduation 
from West Point. I have a thirteen-year-old 
daughter Jane whom we plan to bring with 
us. Give everyone my love." 

Gertrude Franklin Lowell thinks she may 
be able to get in a few of the doings at Abbot. 
Her son graduates at Governor Dummer in 
June. Her daughter Virginia is a freshman at 
Wellesley "where she seems to be mixing 
dates with studying and doing very well." 
Kay Gage, Sister Mary Anselm, is novice 
mistress at St. Mary's Convent, Peekskill, 
N. Y. She writes, "I'm trying to get ready to 
take the finals for my master's degree at 
Columbia this spring. My hobbies are ghost 
stories and gardening." Olive Howard Vance 
is running her husband's business until he 
has recovered his health. Her oldest daugh- 
ter Carolyn will be married May 25, and 
Gale, her oldest son, will move his family into 
a house he has bought. So "reunion seems 
rather uncertain." Helen Knight Wilkinson 
expects to be at reunion. Her son, Chad- 
bourne Graves, enlisted last August in the 
USA after graduating from Phillips, and is 
now a member of the Medical Corp con- 
nected with the Food Inspection detachment 
stationed in Italy. Wendy, aged four, is in 
kindergarten and Linda, two, keeps her 
busy. Helen is Andover chairman of the 
Women's Educational Committee for the 
Children's Hospital new Medical Center in 
Boston. 

Sissy Kunhel Rahill says, "I hope to get to 
Andover for reunion this year. My son is 
graduating from Kimball Union Academy, 
Meriden, N. H., this June and I shall be 
coming up that way. I shall probably bring 
my youngest daughter, eight, with me. My 
older daughter, who has always been con- 
fined to a wheel chair, is a junior at Calawba 
College, N. C. I do a little secretarial work 
for my cousin who is Representative in Con- 
gress from this district, and that combined 
with necessary domestic duties keeps me 
rather busy." Florence Phillips Cooke is 



28 



planning to come. She has three boys and a 
daughter. James, a junior at Kimball Union 
Academy, Phillips Carter a freshman also at 
Kimball, Johnson in the seventh grade, and 
Nancy in second grade. They are all ski 
enthusiasts and spent the Christmas holidays 
at the Chantecler at Ste. Adele in the Lau- 
rentians. 

Susie Root Adams says she hopes to be at 
reunion. Her husband is having his 25th re- 
union at Law School. Faneuil Jr. is being 
married in June, and they move to Duxbury 
for the summer at that time. Faneuil is in 
Harvard Law School after three and one- 
half years in the paratroops. A son, thirteen, 
is at Shady Hill School in Cambridge. 

Marian Rugg Cay wood says she "can't be 
East for reunion, but would love to see the 
girls. My Abby and I spent her spring vaca- 
tion in New Orleans. This summer we expect 
to pick her up at camp and be in Michigan 
for August. Jess Patton and her family were 
in Florida with our parents this winter. Love 
to all." Kay Weeks Plaisted writes that she 
has a boy thirteen who will be ready for prep 
school next year, and a girl whom she hopes 
will go to Abbot. They have a camp at Mere- 
dith where they spend the summer. Her hus- 
band's hobby is boats. 

Anne Whinery is seriously considering 
making the trip from Richmond, Va., for 
reunion. 

Alice Van Schmus Smith has three daugh- 
ters, Ann, Ellen and Maggy, of whom she 
and her husband are very proud. They keep 
her busy so she doesn't have time for much 
outside activity. 

Betty Whittemore is in Honolulu. "My 
best aloha to all my class on this 25th re- 
union. I wish I could be with you and put 
around your necks the lovely Hawaiian leis 
of friendship. I live at Wannawiki, which 
used to be one of the fabulous old ranches, 
and is the place where Princess Liliokalawi 
wrote 'Aloha Oe.' Wish I could be with 
you." 

Jimmy Burr Sanders says, "I expect to at- 
tend our 25th reunion and am looking for- 
ward to it. About my family; last year I lost 
my father, Mr. G. B. Burr of Bangor, Maine. 
On January my oldest daughter Barbara, 
Abbot '42, was married to Wilton W. Dad- 
mun. They are now residing in Miami, Fla., 
where he is attending Miami University. 
My youngest daughter Carol attends Colby 
Junior College, and likes it very much. Dur- 



ing the war I worked in the office of a de- 
fense plant producing radar. Now I do volun- 
teer work for Motor Corps, Newton Red 
Cross Chapter." 

Gwen Blocmfield Tillson writes, "Bob was 
in the Navy 38 months and is back at Dart- 
mouth, is to be married June 21st. Dick is 
18 and is finishing his freshman year at 
Dartmouth. Debbie is in the second grade. 
See you in June." 

Lib Hutchinson Graham reports that, "My 
eldest daughter Joan is at Endicott Junior 
College. Margot is in high school, and Bobbie 
still in grammar school. Arch has gone into 
the real estate and insurance business for 
himself. He is completely wrapped up in 
trout fishing in the spring. Is there any fishing 
near Andover? What about Olive and Suzie 
Root and Jimmy Burr? Will they get back?" 

Marion Saunders Chesborough plans to 
attend reunion. Her oldest son has just re- 
turned from eleven months in Germany. 
The second son will enter University of N.C. 
in September, and the youngest will be at 
home. 

Beatrice Goff is working in Springfield, 
Ohio, "as Executive Director of the Y.W. 
C.A. If there are any Abbot girls nearby tell 
them to let me know. Greetings to every- 
body." 

1923 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Sterling Dow 
(Elizabeth Flagg), 36 Holden St., Cam- 
bridge. 

1924 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. A. John Hol- 
den (Polly Bullard), 39 Mt. Pleasant St., 
Middlebury, Vt. 

Marjorie Wolfe Staples says, "Still pursu- 
ing my hobby of writing; current specialty 
being short, short-stories of which, through a 
literary agent, two have recently been 
bought by a magazine named Business Farm- 
ing, published in Sherbourne, N. Y. None of 
my classmates live near, but I did have the 
pleasure of a visit by Mad Shepard in No- 
vember." 

1925 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. George B. 
Beveridge (Charlotte Hanna), Sanfordtown 
Rd., Redding, Conn. 

Dorothy Beeley Marsh reports, "Am now 
back in Massachusetts after fifteen years in 



29 



California and two in Michigan. Would like 
to have any Abbot girls near Worcester come 
to see me at my new address : Christian Hill 
Farm, Barre, Mass." 

Time to enter your daughter for 1 948 and 
1949! Write to Abbot for a catalogue. 

1926 

Charles H. Sawyer, husband of Katharine 
Clay, has been named Director of Yale Uni- 
versity's division of the arts, and Dean of the 
Yale School of the Fine Arts. They will go to 
New Haven from Worcester, where he is 
Director of the Art Museum. 

1927 
Twentieth Reunion 

Message from Sydna White, Reunion Chair- 
man, 391 Bleecker St., New York 14, N. Y. 
Hello '27. Those of you still hoping to get to 
reunion will be cheered by the news that 
about half the class expect to be back. There 
are 15 members who live in Massachusetts, 
and ten others from other states, who have 
already written that they hope to make it. 
Miriam Houdlette, chairman of arrange- 
ments for the dinner to be held Saturday 
night, has reserved the private dining room 
at the Andover Inn where we will meet at 
^ p.m. in order to have a good three-hour 
session before the school evening program. 
Let these bits of news inspire you. Double 
your effort and come too! 

Helen Amesse wrote a good full letter from 
Denver where she is in the University of 
Denver Library. She suggests that a Round 
Robin should be started for the benefit of 
girls too far from Andover to return. Her 
address is: 1675 Kearney, Denver 7, Colo. 
Friends please notice. 

Mary Ayers Hower who hasn't been back 
for 15 years, at least, hopes to come on from 
Akron, Ohio. 

Persis Goodnow Brown is to be on hand. 
Her daughter Jane, president of the senior 
class, took the part of Susan Throssel in 
Quality Street, the senior play, the same part 
Persis herself took in 1927! 

Kay Farlow Hutchinson writes of her busy 
life as the mother of two boys, and the wife 
of the manager of a gold mine. She is in 
Goodyears Bar, Calif. 

Mary Knight Reeves writes from Lexing- 
ton, Ky., that her husband is assistant pro- 



fessor of Political Science at the University of 
Kentucky. He is at present on leave of ab- 
sence and working to get voters' support for a 
convention for the purpose of writing a new 
state constitution, considered by many to be 
needed. Mary has three children, ages nine, 
five and three. 

June Hinman Marques reports three sons, 
Roy Hinman, born February 10, 1937; John 
Walter, born February 28, 1943, and Paul 
Robert, born March 20, 1946. Her husband 
is a marine engineer. 

Ruth Perry sends greetings from Midland, 
Mich., where she is secretary to the president 
of the Dow Chemical Co. 

Edna Russell Watson plans to come. This 
is the first time she has been able to make it. 

Some of you are still to be heard from. 
Whether or not you can come, please send in 
the questionnaires you received from me, 
with good full answers. We want snapshots 
too. But most of all we want to see YOU. 

Sydna 

1928 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Emily Sloper, 
36 Russell St., New Britain, Conn. 

Isabelle Bartlett Hogue reports two chil- 
dren, Steven Breck Hogue, nine, and Pa- 
tricia Ann, six years old. Isabelle is Girl 
Scout Volunteer-Chairman of Organization, 
in the Louisville, Ky. Council. 

Beatrice Lane Mercer sent from Sarasota, 
Fla., an attractive snapshot of herself and 
family. She writes, "We have a well-furnished 
cheery cottage on the beach, and we are all 
enjoying ourselves immensely. The children 
go to school except four-year-old Ruthie." 

1929 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Laurent A. Daloz 
(Lois Hardy), a son, Charles Roland, April 4. 

Eleanor Jones Bennett writes of the sad 
loss of her daughter Patricia, on January 15. 

1930 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Jack R. War- 
wick (Mary Jane Owsley), 26 Ledgewood 
Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Born: to Mr. and Mrs. George A. Jenkins 
(Janice Lovell), a fourth child, Richard 
Thomas, November 24, 1946. 

1931 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Francis Hol- 
land (Barbara Graham), 644 Orchard St., 
East Lansing, Mich. 



30 



Born: To Mr. and Mrs. David L. Babson 
(Katherine Allen), a third child, a daughter, 
Katherine Lockhart, January 5. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Harold C. God- 
dard (Betty Dix), twin sons, Clifford Turner 
and Carlton Dix, April 1 1 . John is three 
years old. 

Married: Harriet Gregory Weatherly to 
Forris W. Morris Jr. 

Nancy Carr Holmes is with her husband in 
Japan. She says, "We are near Sapporo, on 
the island of Hokkaido. As we are so far 
north the climate is very much like New 
England, and there are all kinds of winter 
sports. The army has provided very nice 
living quarters for all dependents, there is no 
servant problem as the Japanese govern- 
ment provides them. If there are other Abbot 
girls over here I wish they would get in 
touch with me." Address: % Capt. J. D. 
Holmes 0-300415. Hqs. Co. 2nd Bn. 187 
Glider Inf., nth Airborne A P O 468, 
% Postmaster, San Francisco, Cal. 

1932 

Fifteenth Reunion 

Greetings '32 — I hope many of you are 
now making your plans for our 15th Reun- 
ion, and especially for the Luncheon on 
Saturday, May 31st. If you can't come, how 
about a letter telling us all the news — to be 
read at Reunion? The holiday weekend 
seems to be a busy time for some of you, but 
we'd all like to know where you are and 
what you're doing. If you'll drop me a note 
sometime soon I'll guarantee to make copies 
of those received and send them around to 
those of you not able to be in Andover. 
How about it? Send off a letter today. 

Yours, 

Betty Boyce 
154 Main St. 
Andover, Mass. 
Reunion Chairman 

Helen Allen Henry says, "I find being an 
Alumna Trustee of Abbot one of the most re- 
warding experiences I have ever had. I 
heartily recommend it! My home, three sons, 
volunteer work, plus trying to raise seven 
million dollars for Smith keeps me busy — 
plus!" 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Norman P. Hamil- 
ton (Marian Dix), a second child, a daugh- 
ter Barbara, April 9. 

Mary Thompson Sherman writes, "My 



daughter Nancy, three and one-half years 
old, will be starting nursery school in the fall. I 
am on the Board of the Rhode Island Welles- 
ley Club which will soon be busy raising 
money for the 75th Anniversary Fund. I am 
indeed sorry I shall be unable to come to re- 
union." 

Dorothy Rockwell is "still with the Wash- 
ington Bureau of the Philadelphia Inquirer 
and an international vice-president of the 
American Newspaper Guild (CIO). Greet- 
ings to all who get to Andover. Any news 
from LUCY DRUMMOND, MIX HYDE, 
CLARE SMITH or BETTY WEAVER?" 

Betty Bigler de Masi writes, "Betty Boyce 
and Georgia Thomson blew into Washington 
for overnight March 24, and we had a fine 
reunion together. I find living near Washing- 
ton I see many old friends. We are in the 
telephone book and I hope, "gals of '32", I'll 
be seeing more of you some day." 

Married: Marietta Marshall to Dr. John 
A. Dudis, May 18, 1946. Address: 181 Main 
St., Athol. 

1933 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Robert D. 
Johnson (Margaret Chase), 100 Stuyvesant 
PL, St. George, Staten Island, X T . Y. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Roger R. Valken- 
burgh (Alice Schultz), a second child and 
first son, Roger Ransom, February 15. 

Louise McClary is working as Medical 
Secretary in Boston. 

Martha Whipple Davis writes, "We have 
bought a larger house to accommodate our 
three Abbot prospects, Sally eleven, Xancy 
nine, and Susan two years old next Xovem- 
ber. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. A. Lawrence Van 
Wart (Betty Weaver) , a daughter, Gretchen, 
Xovember 9, 1946. 

1934 

Hope Humphreys took top honors for 
women entrants in the coveted Roch Tro- 
phy ski races, held at Aspen, Colo. She com- 
pleted the hazardous 1.6 miles, 2,400 ft. drop 
in 2.35 minutes. She also won the women's 
slalom event. 

Sally O'Reilly Loria reported on her inter- 
esting summer. "W T e spent the summer in 
Italy, where we visited ray husband's family 
in Florence. It was wonderful to meet them 
all and to hear about their experiences dur- 
ing the war. I hope more will send in news, 



31 



it's always interesting to know what the old 
friends are doing." 

1935 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Prescott Coan 
(Frances McTernen) , a son, Jeffrey Prescott, 
January 26. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Norman S. Lane 
(Cecile Van Peursem), a second son, Richard 
King, January 9. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. William H. Mor- 
ton (Phyllis Harding), a son, William H. 
Morton Jr., March 21. 

Notify the Alumnae Office promptly of 
any change of address. 



1936 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. William J. Starr 
Jr. (Marion Mooney), a third child, second 
daughter, Ellen Lyons, November 24, 1946. 

Married: Barbara Souther to Lt. Col. 
Frederick J. Cooke, December 27, 1946. 
Address: 10B Forsyth Ave., Fort Riley, Kans. 

1937 
Tenth Reunion 

Reunion Chairman : Joan Todd Wilkinson, 
Tinton Ave., Eatontown, N.J. 

A large reunion is anticipated; come if you 
possibly can make it, for Alumnae Day or 
longer. 

Thelma Cutter is in Germany with the Air 
Force Statistical Control Unit, expects to 
return next September. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Kirk- 
patrick (Betty Inman), a son, Allan Murray, 
February 5. 

Martha Ransom Tucker has been elected 
the new president of the Boston Abbot Club. 

Joan Todd Wilkinson has a new adopted 
daughter, Nina, born January 3, bringing 
her family to three children. 

Jeannette Partridge Harrison and family 
are busy doing over an old house in Nor- 
wood. 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Arthur W. 
Tucker (Martha E. Ransom), 632 Great 
Plain Rd., Needham. 

1938 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Mansfield Pickett 
(Barbara Littauer), a second daughter, 
Andrea, March 4. 



Sally Peck sends her greetings from the 
Munich (Germany) Air Base, where she is 
doing Red Cross work. "To see this base and 
its living conditions for the men, one would 
never believe that this was the conquering 
army, no spoils here for the victor, all spoiled 
for themselves about the last day of the war 
by the 8th Air Force." Sally's address is: 
American Red Cross, Hq. 60th Troop Car- 
rier GP, APO 407-A % PM, New York, 
N.Y. 

Married: Madeleine Proctor to the Rev. 
Donald Robertson Woodward, April 9. 
Jacqueline Proctor de Brun '40, was her 
sister's maid of honor. Mr. Woodward is 
rector of the Church of the Incarnation in 
Lynn. 

Jane Russell Brown writes, "I have been in 
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, for almost two years, 
working for UNRA in the Health Division, 
excellent work has been done by our doctors, 
particularly in plastic surgery." 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John White (Anne 
Simpson), a third daughter, Katharine, 
February 9. The twin girls are now three 
years old. 

1939 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Howard B. Duell 
Jr. (Sarah Bradley), a daughter, Patricia 
Louise, October 27, 1946. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John B. Nunez 
(Joyce Curran), a daughter, Lee Ann, Feb- 
ruary 1. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Worthen 
(Nancy England), a daughter, Sarah Wash- 
burn, April 7. 

Engaged: Marjorie MacMullen to Lt. 
Knox Freytag, AUS, MC. Marjorie is serving 
as a clinical psychologist for the veterans 
language clinic at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, Boston, and in the same capacity 
at Cushing Veteran's Administration at 
Framingham. 

Engaged: Ann Oakman to Frank Keegan. 

Married: Frances Cross to Dr. Francis 
Seymour Jones, April 19. 

1940 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Howard 
Nutting (Mary Howard), 157 Institution 
Ave., Newton Center. 

Ellen Alden Reed reports the purchase of a 
home in Detroit, 19979 Ward Ave., Zone 21. 
She hopes to see any alumnae who live in 
that vicinity. 



32 



Carolyn Cross Robbins is living in Geneva, 
111., where her husband has a position as a 
Research Engineer for Operadio Co. She 
has been elected the new president of the 
Chicago Abbot Club. 

Married: Barbara Fowler to Ex-Capt. 
Robert C. Borden Jr., May 17, 1946. Ad- 
dress: 16 Sherman Ave., Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Nancy Harrison completed her three 
years' course of training at Children's Hos- 
pital, Boston, March 1. She is returning 
there to work as a staff nurse. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Guy de Brun 
(Jacqueline Proctor), a second child, a son, 
Harlan, in March. 

Libby Travis Sollenberger is enjoying life 
in Hawaii. She writes, "Harold is stationed 
here at the Naval Air Station, Kaneohe, 
Hawaii, flying patrol bombers. I am keeping 
busy washing diapers, painting and decorat- 
ing the apartment my husband built, and 
diving into my job as station organist and 
choir director. I also have two piano students 
and four organ students. Eighteen-months- 
old Robin is known as a little Indian and 
his favorite sport is riding the surf board in 
front of Da-da!" 

Born: To Dr. and Mrs. William H. Ainslie 
(Nancy Wilson), a son, William Horn Ainslie 
Jr., February 22. 

Joan Webster is working as a receptionist 
at the Waltham Screw Co. 

Engaged: Beverley Winslow to William 
Stark Hansen. 

Married: Christine Robinson to Vance 
Fisher Likins Jr., February 15. 

1941 

Class Fund Secretary: Mrs. Frederick S. 
Kremer (Sue Long), 130 East 75th St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Engaged: Harriet Beach to William Illing- 
worth Zeitung. 

Engaged: Nancy Eccles to Reginald 
Roome Jr. She plans a June wedding. Mr. 
Roome is an instructor in St. George's 
School, of which her father is headmaster. 

Married: Eleanor Rafton to Harold Na- 
thaniel Gordon, February 16. 

Sue Long Kremer is assistant director of 
publicity at the Hotel Plaza, New York. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Edgar J. Wicker 
(Dorothy White), a son, Robert Crawford, 
March 24. 

Polly Packard Blackmore's two-year-old 
son Paul, died very suddenly on February 



23. She has a small daughter, Laura Lucille, 
ten months old. 



Please send wedding invitations or an- 
nouncements to the Alumnae Office. 



1942 
Fifth Reunion 

Members of the Class of '42: Just how 
often have you thought of Abbot in the last 
five years? And just how many Abbot class- 
mates do you think of or actually see these 
days? 

If your answers to these questions are what 
I think they are, then it is high time we had a 
reunion. This five-year mark is such an im- 
portant one. If we don't make the effort to 
get together now, you know we never will. 
So do plan to be on deck for our fifth reunion! 

Jeanne Bowersox 
287 Willow St. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Reunion Chairman 

Mary Louise Bertucio not certain about 
reunion. She is in Medical School at the 
University of Vermont and expects finals 
around June 1. She finished Vassar with 
Gretchen Roemer and Frannie Flint. Loves 
medical school but is plenty busy, (propor- 
tion of women to men in first year is 9-3 1 , so 
should be interesting!). 

Mary Margaret Boynton McPherson can't 
come to reunion, she will be moving to 
another house in Williamstown, where she 
will be until September. 

Suzanne Bates Heath not sure about re- 
union. She must attend three weddings and a 
graduation in June. If they get a car there is 
a better chance. She is kept busy with her 
one and one-half year old baby girl. 

Gloria Caldarone definitely planning to 
come. 

Louise Clark Gilland writes from Tokyo,, 
where her husband is stationed in the Army 
of Occupation, "We are stationed about 50 
miles north of Tokyo, at an outpost. All 
around are rice paddies as far as you can see. 
The town we're near was bombed on the 
very last day of the war, as there were several 
munitions factories here. We have an apart- 
ment in a remodeled Jap house and there are 
two other nice couples with us. Life isn't 



33 



exactly gay here. We have each two Jap girls 
and a houseboy, which is sort of ridiculous, 
but we're taking full advantage of it. I stud- 
ied Japanese for three months, enough to 
make my girls understand. Flower arranging 
is another fascinating subject. There are 
almost 50 dependents and many children in 
our area. We are fairly well although we all 
miss fresh milk terribly. Would love to hear 
from my classmates!" 

Address: Mrs. James W. Gilland, % Lt. 
J. W. Gilland, 027484, 82d A. A. Bu., A P O 
201-3, % PM, San Francisco, Calif. 

Patricia Daniels Hanson is undecided about 
reunion but she "would like nothing better 
than to go East and see Abbot and the girls 
once more. There are so many things to be 
considered when you have a family!" Her 
son is 14 months old. 

Mary Elizabeth Dunaway Burnham can't 
come 'cause her husband is going into the 
Navy in June, and she is expecting in Sep- 
tember. She wants to be remembered to 
everyone. She has been out West. 

Dorothy Erkert can't come. She is doing 
professional Girl Scouting and May 31 will 
find her busy with last-minute camp details. 
She loves her job, something new every day. 

Mary Ellen Finneran is definitely coming. 
She is working at Phillips Exeter Academy 
and loves it, even if it is "the enemy camp." 

Diantha Hamilton McDowell definitely 
coming. Her sister graduates this year. 

Betty Hardy Verdery not sure about re- 
union. Bangor, Maine is so far away! 

Margaret McFarlin definitely coming. She 
is doing staff nursing at North Conway, 
N. H.j and loves her work and the skiing. 

Ruth Rathbone Hildreth definitely coming, 
can hardly wait. 

Florence Shaw was married on November 
2, 1946, to Ronald Floyd Sickler. He is a 
student at Rutgers College after four years 
in the navy. 

Ann Taylor coming. She graduated from 
Swarthmore in February and has helped her 
mother since then. She expects to work in 
New York this summer, and wants to take 
some courses at Columbia for her master's. 
She loved Swarthmore, as they all do. 

Thirsa Sands Fuiks' daughter, Susan Arden, 
was born on April 16. 

Margaret Sime was married on November 
2, 1946, to Niels Espeland, in East Africa. 
She writes of exciting new experiences. "We 
are in our own house, not at the mine, but 



300 feet above it, off in the bush and in the 
loveliest spot you can imagine. We had a 
funny experience when we went out on the 
plains. On our way home after dark, we saw 
a large lump on the road ahead, but couldn't 
make out what it was. It rose slowly, walked 
to the side of the road, to glare into the head- 
lights. Then we saw it was a leopard and we 
were delighted!" Buhemba Mines, Box 36, 
Musoma, Tanganyika, East Africa. 

Rose Wind is engaged to James J. O. Stone 
plans to be married on June 1. 

Juliette Weston Suhr lives in California, is 
expecting in August. 

1943 

Married: Dorothy Barlow to John E. Gay- 
ton, May 11, 1946. Dorothy is at present on 
the faculty of Simmons College as Assistant 
in the Chemistry Dept. She also does proof- 
reading and copy editing for the Journal of 
the American Chemical Society. 

Engaged: Catherine Feeney to Joseph 
Powell Flynn. 

Married : Patricia Pettengill to John Tuck- 
er Whitaker, April 19. Ann Loughridge was 
one of her bridesmaids. 

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Hibshman 
(Winifred Tucker), a son, Joell Randolph, 
February 17. 

Engaged: Helen Sedgwick Barss to David 
B. Weden Jr. A June wedding is planned. 

Married: Joan Holden to Charles Nicholas 
Remy, April 9. 

Married: Sylvia Ann Peters to Robert 
Dean Agler, April 5. 

1944 

Married: Ruth Kirstein to Daniel Tur- 
kanis. 

Margaret Travis plans to spend her sum- 
mer vacation from Vassar in Hawaii with 
her sister, Libby Travis Sollenberger. 

Engaged: Nancy Baylor to Edward Filene 
Little. Nancy is planning a wedding on 
June 7. 

Married: Charlotte Trow to Earl Albert 
Young, April 19. 

1945 

Married: June Livermore to Harold Reid 
Jr., January 25. 

Engaged : Helen Norris to Bernard Clifford 
Stearns. 



34 



Hilary Paterson has been elected president 
of her class at Vassar College. 

Mary Lou Stegner writes, "I am in my 
sophomore year at the University of Michi- 
gan. I begin concentration next year and I 
have chosen French as my major and Span- 
ish as my minor. During my two summers 
since graduation I have been doing play- 
ground and camp work. I saw my roommate, 
Molly Robbins, while in New York, and 
Cynthia Smith stopped here to see me during 
her Easter vacation." 

Engaged: Virginia Ann Walen (aff. '45) to 
George Baldwin Walker. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Shirley Som- 
mer, 1367 Brown Hills Rd., Rockford, 111. 

1946 

Dear '46ers: Remember our resolutions! 
Class of '46 will have a huge reunion or die in 
the attempt! We've just got to make this the 
biggest celebration possible. I know you are 
all very busy with college, and May 3 1 is near 
exam time, but if you can get a day or so, 
come to Abbot. Wouldn't you like to go back 
to the "Circle" and see how our magnolia is 
thriving? Wouldn't it be fun to reminisce 
with the faculty and Abbot gals? Let's meet 
at Baronial. If we are going to "march to- 
gether ever on throughout our future days" 
we can do that only by turning up for re- 



union, and cooperating with the Bulletin! 
Hope to see you all, 

Sally Allen 
Briarcliff Junior College 
Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 
Reunion Chairman 

Planning to attend reunion are: Cynthia 
Noone, recently initiated into Alpha Phi, a 
national fraternity; Louise Doyle; Barbara 
Graf; Sally North hopes to have Patty 
Keefer with her; Nancy Thomas who has 
announced her engagement to Arthur Whit- 
comb, brother of Hope Whitcomb; Marian 
Troub. 

Mary Howe writes that the reunion in 
Boston was loads of fun, she saw Gail Sulli- 
van, Ellen Brumbach, Susie Wright, Betty 
Keefer and Luty Robertson. 

Frannie Little is at Michigan where she 
has met Mary Lou Stegner, who is majoring 
in French. 

Laurie Woodruff is living at the Three 
Arts Club in New York, studying at the Art 
Students League. 

Margie Sommer is pledged Pi Beta Phi at 
Rollins. "G.B." Wright is pledged Chi 
Omega at Rollins. 

Married: Gertrude Stearns (aff. '46) to 
John Heywood, February 27. Deborah Wig- 
gin was one of her bridesmaids. 

Class Fund Secretary: Miss Mary Burton, 
33 Afterglow Way, Montclair, N. J. 



Faculty Notes 

Miss Hearsey is expected to return from Bermuda in time for Com- 
mencement. 

Miss Eleanor Tucker has been appointed from the faculty to represent 
Abbot at the Oxford Summer School gathering of representatives of Ameri- 
can schools who opened their doors to English children during the war. 
Funds raised at that time and not expended are being used to entertain 
partially as the guests of Great Britain those who will go from the American 
schools. Miss Tucker will leave on May 31, and be abroad for six weeks. 



35 



u 



RITE news about yourself and others for the October Bulletin. Tear 
out and mail before September 15, 1947, to the Alumnae Office, Abbot 
Academy, Andover, Mass. 



Married Name 

Maiden Name Glass 

Address Postal Zone 



BOSTON-ANDOVER TRAIN SERVICE 

from 

NORTH STATION, BOSTON 



(Daylight time) 



DAILY 










Lv. 


And. 


12. 17 


PM 


Ar. 


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Lv. Bost. 7.45 


AM Ar. 


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8-37 


AM 






12.54 




55 


55 


1.32 " 


10.15 


55 55 


55 


10.59 


55 






2.13 




55 


55 


2.56 


11.00 


55 55 




11. 51 


55 






3-30 




55 


55 


4.14 


12.30 


PM " 




1 . 14 


PM 






4.42 




55 


55 


5-i9 " 


*I-25 


55 55 




2.09 


55 






5-39 




55 


55 


6.23 " 


2 . 30 


55 55 




3- J 3 


55 






7-i3 




55 


55 


8.05 " 


3-55 


55 55 




4-25 


55 






8.31 




55 


55 


9.18 " 


4-32 


55 55 




5.20 


55 






10.37 




5 5 


55 


11.22 " 


5-H 


55 55 




5-45 


55 
















t5-32 


55 55 




6.19 


55 


SUNDAY 










5-55 
6.55 

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55 55 
55 55 
55 55 




6-33 

7.42 

8.34 


55 
55 
55 


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55 


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10.30 


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55 55 


And. 

55 


8 . 45 AM 
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8.40 

9.40 

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Lv. And. 7.25 

8.09 


55 55 
55 55 
55 55 
55 55 

AM Ar. 

55 55 


Bost. 


9.28 
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1 1 . 40 
12.44 

7-59 
8.40 

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55 

55 
55 
55 

AM 

55 




55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 


2.00 

3-30 
5.10 

7-35 

8-45 
11.30 


PM 

55 

55 
55 
55 
55 


55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 


55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 


2.43 PM 
4.14 " 

5-47 " 
8.25 " 

9-35 
12.21 " 


8.43 
9.14 


55 55 
55 55 




55 
55 


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55 


7.01 
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55 55 


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55 


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55 55 




10.05 

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55 

55 




55 
55 


12.20 
2.36 


PM 

55 


55 
55 


55 

55 


1 . 06 PM 
3.20 " 


11. 19 


55 55 




12.02 


PM 




55 


3-56 


55 


55 


55 


4.41 " 


* Saturday only 


f Friday only 






55 
55 


6.19 
9-25 


55 


55 

55 


55 
55 


7-05 " 
10.13 " 














55 


10.38 


55 


55 


55 


11.28 " 



to 



\) 



WELLS BINDERY 
ALTHAM, MASS. 



NOV. 1947